Co-Funded Projects

Project Title Society Purpose Project Description Location
2017-2018 Co-Funded Projects - FESBC / HCTF
Fisher Habitat Conservation - Provincial Extension Program Habitat Enhancement This project will provide opportunities for training and the application of best management practices to a variety of forestry practitioners who make decisions that affect the supply of fisher habitat throughout British Columbia. Provincial (multi-region)
Determining factors that affect survival of moose in central BC Habitat Enhancement In response to declining moose numbers in central BC, a 5-year Provincially coordinated moose research study was initiated in 2013. This 2-year HCTF project will enable a Postdoctoral Fellow to analyze 5-years of survival of collared cow moose (Dec 2013–Mar 2018) with reference to the landscape-change hypothesis to help inform moose management in BC Provincial (multi-region)
West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project Habitat Enhancement The primary objective of this project is to reestablish viable Roosevelt Elk populations in wilderness areas of the West Coast Region while mitigating conflicts through translocation of elk from agricultural areas and along the highways of Vancouver Island, BC.Partnerships with community organizations, stakeholders, industry and First Nations governments, for translocations are key to facilitate recovery of this blue-listed species on Vancouver Island. Relocated herds will help improve ecosystem function and provide future opportunities for sustenance and recreational uses in new population units. Vancouver Island
Improving Wildlife Habitat in Logged and Fire-Damaged Coastal Forests Habitat Enhancement We will increase the quantity and quality of habitat for wetland-dependent wildlife on the Sunshine Coast by working with logging contractors and tenure holders to conserve wetlands during forestry operations, and to restore, enhance, and create wetlands in recently logged and fire damaged forests. Lower Mainland
Fisher Artificial Reproductive Den Box Study Habitat Enhancement Fisher are the largest obligate cavity user and use cavities in large diameter den trees for reproductive dens. Suitable trees for reproductive dens are rare in the landscape and impacts due to MPB and fire in many areas of the province have further reduced the availability of this habitat feature. This project will demonstrate the extent that artificial den boxes can be used to augment fisher reproductive denning habitat in areas where natural den trees have been reduced. Thompson - Nicola
Thompson Burn Program Habitat Enhancement The intent of this project will be to reintroduce fire into the low-mid elevation dry forest and grassland ecosystems to restore and improve forage nutrition and availability primarily for mule deer and bighorn sheep. Thompson - Nicola
Boundary Restoration and Enhancement Program Habitat Enhancement This project will improve habitat quality, resiliency and forage availability for ungulates and other native species by restoring or enhancing degraded habitats in a range of ecosystems across the Boundary. This project will build community stewardship and technical capacity through the use of partnerships and local contractors. Kootenays
Improving Mountain Caribou Calf Survival through Maternal Penning in the Revelstoke Area Habitat Enhancement Mountain caribou calf survival remains too low to support population recovery. This project will determine if maternal penning can improve the survival of calves and adults in the Columbia Mountains Ecosystem by protecting them in a secure enclosure for four months until calves are larger and more capable of avoiding predation. If successful, this tool will would help to reduce the rate of decline and increase the size of the Columbia North caribou subpopulation. Kootenays
West Kootenay Mule Deer Habitat Restoration Habitat Enhancement This project will identify important mule deer habitats in the West Kootenay and plan ecosystem restoration activities to improve quality of habitat. Kootenays
Enhancing Wolf Monitoring in the Kootenay Region Habitat Enhancement Work with key stakeholders, First Nations, and contract and provincial biologists to assess cost-effective ways of surveying wolves and compile historical data on wolf population trends. The research will involve a literature review of existing and emerging methods to survey wolves, an assessment of cost-effectiveness for these methods, and stakeholder engagement to develop new citizen-science tools to monitor wolf distribution, abundance, and trends. Kootenays
Restoring Ungulate Habitat Through Clumpy Spacing Habitat Enhancement A clumpy-spacing trial was installed in 1990 to examine habitat enhancement for ungulates through a unique spacing regime of overstocked stands of juvenile trees.This project will evaluate whether clumping spacing enhanced habitat use by ungulates and regionally important wildlife. Cariboo
High Lake Grassland and Open Forest Restoration Pilot Habitat Enhancement This three year project will remove tree encroachment from grasslands and ingrowth from Douglas-fir stands within mule deer winter range in Churn Creek Protected Area.It will evaluate and demonstrate a model for treating more extensive areas within the Protected Area. Cariboo
Ecology of small mammals in post-fire and salvage-logged landscapes Habitat Enhancement Fires and post-fire salvage-logging have unknown but likely significant impacts on small mammals, which are often important prey species for forest carnivores.This project will quantify abundances and distribution of mice and voles, snowshoe hares, and red squirrels in response to these disturbances in a study area where we are conducting concurrent work on marten. Cariboo
The response of caribou terrestrial forage lichens to MPB, forest harvesting and fire in the East Ootsa and Entiako areas Habitat Enhancement This project assesses the effects of MPB, forest harvesting and fire on caribou terrestrial forage lichens on the Tweedsmuir-Entiako caribou winter range by re-measuring permanent sample plots that were established in 2001 and remeasured in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2011 Skeena
Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat Habitat Enhancement This project is restoring endangered whitebark pine ecosystems with high habitat value for bears in the southern Skeena Region. In 2017-18 we will plant 6500 rust-free seedlings in two BC Parks and a Community Forest, scope out the 2018 cone crop, stratify & sow 20,000 seeds, and continue capacity-building and outreach. Skeena
Enhancing caribou survival within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds Habitat Enhancement This is year 4 of 5 planned years during which maternal penning will be used as one of several complementary emergency measures implemented to avert extirpation, and eventually recover, the population of caribou known as the Klinse-Za/Scott herds located in the south Peace region of northern British Columbia. Omineca/Peace
Mule Deer Monitoring in the Prince George area Habitat Enhancement Mule deer provide significant hunting opportunities in central BC. However, local observations from hunters have consistently reported declining mule deer numbers in the Prince George area and there is no inventory or trend monitoring to validate these concerns.The Spruce City Wildlife Association is seeking funds to help establish a long-term monitoring program for mule deer within the wildlife management units surrounding Prince George.With support from Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO), bi-annual ground based surveys will be conducted by local hunters/volunteers to document fawn recruitment, sex ratios and buck age classes that will provide key information on population vital rates and trend; such information will help biologists understand how mule deer demographics change seasonally and over time and will facilitate mule deer management. Omineca/Peace
Effects of habitat alteration on caribou forage lichens Habitat Enhancement This project assesses the effects of MPB, logging and prescribed fire on caribou terrestrial forage lichens on the Wolverine and Tweedsmuir-Entiako caribou winter ranges.Previously established permanently marked plots at 3 sites will be re-measured in 2017 and will be combined with data collected at 5 sites in 2016 for analysis. Omineca/Peace
Assessment of habitat alteration on caribou ranges in northern BC Habitat Enhancement The project will assess the current level of habitat alteration on caribou ranges in northern BC using available GIS datasets, and identify information gaps and issues. Omineca/Peace
Forage Response to Prescribed Fire in the Northern Rockies : Implications for Stone's Sheep and elk - 7 Years Later Habitat Enhancement This project will assess the long-term influence of prescribed fire of forage characteristics for Stone's sheep and elk. It will make recommendations to improve the current prescribed burning program relative to effective timing by contrasting the plant and animal immediate responses (1 year after burning) to longer-term responses (7 years post burn). Omineca/Peace
Wolf predation risk to moose in north-central BC Habitat Enhancement This project will investigate seasonal wolf predation risk to moose in two of the provincial moose research project study sites. We will track kill sites of 5 wolf packs in each site by deploying satellite collars and checking location clusters for evidence of prey type killed while also determining space use parameters and resource selection. Omineca/Peace
Testing Approaches to Restore Habitat For Caribou Habitat Enhancement This project will restore caribou habitat by mitigating historic linear features thus providing long term protection for the Klinse-Za population (Moberly and Scott East Herds) and reducing the need for the current emergency maternal penning and predator control strategies which are currently preventing extirpation. Omineca/Peace
Fish and Wildlife Habitat Enhancement in the Omineca Region Habitat Enhancement This collaborative project aims to identify areas for potential habitat enhancement in designated Wildlife Habitat Areas and Fisheries Sensitive Watersheds throughout the Omineca Region. SERN will identify specific sites and then submit HCTF proposals to develop prescriptions and implemented treat treatments where warranted. Omineca/Peace
South Okanagan Similkameen Conservation Program (SOSCP) Habitat Conservation Delivery Habitat Enhancement This project will establish fish and wildlife habitat conservation and protection measures through a collaborative partnership model. Focus is on coordinating and implementing of Keeping Nature in Our Future: A Biodiversity Conservation Strategy for the South Okanagan Similkameen, local and regional government environmental planning initiatives and leveraging of resources within the South Okanagan Similkameen Region. Okanagan
Determining the value of post-fire landscapes for American marten Habitat Enhancement American marten are important furbearers in BC, but strategies to facilitate marten recovery postfire have not been established.Our proposal addresses marten population and behavioral responses to fire and post-fire salvage logging to identify post-fire management decisions most likely to meet management goals. Okanagan
Project Title Society Purpose Project Description Location
2018-2019 Co-Funded Projects - FESBC / HCTF
Got Bats? B.C. Community Outreach, Conservation and Citizen Science Project Habitat Enhancement "Got Bats?" is a network of community bat projects across BC that promotes bat conservation through the detection and protection of bat roosts, education to counter negative attitudes towards bats, installation of bat‐houses, and a province‐wide Citizen Science bat count to engage the public and detect population declines due to White-nose Syndrome and other threats. Implemented by local, established stewardship organizations with direct landowner contacts in each region, the importance of this initiative has been widely recognized by the BC Government and BC Bat Action Team, and support for the program is a high priority action item in the BC Bat Action Plan (BC Bat Action Team, 2016). Provincial (multi-region)
Clarifying problematic distributions and habitat use of amphibians at risk in southwestern British Columbia using environmental DNA methods. Habitat Enhancement This project investigates the distribution of four frog species of conservation concern, focusing primarily on the endangered Oregon Spotted Frog. An accurate understanding of the current distributions is required to support appropriate management and species recovery. Environmental DNA methods will be applied, in collaboration with university partners, to achieve increased survey efficacy and accuracy relative to conventional methods. Provincial (multi-region)
Monitoring and Protecting BC''''s bat diversity prior to White-Nose Syndrome Habitat Enhancement White-nose Syndrome continues to devastate eastern bat populations, and is found in Washington state in the west. We will continue to work with cavers and other citizen scientists to identify critical bat habitat, and establish baseline species diversity and relative abundance -- reference points necessary for future monitoring, surveillance, mitigation, and recovery. Provincial (multi-region)
Determining factors that affect survival of moose in central BC (18-0522) Habitat Enhancement In response to declining moose numbers in central BC, a 5-year Provincially coordinated moose research study was initiated in 2013. This 2-year HCTF project will enable a Postdoctoral Fellow to analyze 5-years of survival of collared cow moose (Dec 2013–Dec 2018) with reference to the landscape-change hypothesis to help inform moose management in BC. Provincial (multi-region)
Rattlesnake populations: Response to land management regimes and historical changes. Habitat Enhancement This project revisits the ecology of populations of Western Rattlesnakes (a species-at-risk) originally studied over 30 years ago. The main questions addressed are (i) how have snake populations changed over 30+ years, and (ii) how do different management regimes affected these changes? Given that data of this type are practically nonexistent, this project will provide important new data for assessing how landscape use and attributes affect these animals. Provincial (multi-region)
Developing a prophylactic probiotic approach for reducing white-nose syndrome severity in bats Habitat Enhancement We will develop a prophylaxis for the prevention of white-nose syndrome. To accomplish this, we will derive a probiotic cocktail from anti-Pd bacteria and fungi naturally found on healthy western bat wings and apply to a large mixed roost of Little Brown and Yuma Myotis bats 200 km from the current WNS infection in Washington State. Bats that receive these inoculations at their maternity building roost will leave to hibernation with an altered wing flora comprised of a greater representation of anti-Pd microbes to delay or prevent Pd growth for a critical portion of the winter, hopefully enabling bats to successfully survive hibernation, and establishing a new method to reduce WNS mortality. Provincial (multi-region)
Effects of human disturbances on female wolverines Habitat Enhancement Understanding if human activities permanently displace female wolverines from otherwise suitable habitat is critical to long-term population sustainability. This large-scale survey will use non-invasive methods to examine distribution and habitat selection of female wolverine in the Columbia Mountains and investigate regional gene-flow patterns. Provincial (multi-region)
Fisher Habitat Conservation - Field Trials and Forestry Training Habitat Enhancement This project strives to increase the ability of foresters and forest workers to improve habitat outcomes for fishers in their operations and inspire them to include habitat needs of fishers in their forest management decisions. Provincial (multi-region)
Determining factors affecting moose population change: assessing calving and survival rates. Habitat Enhancement This project will enable new and continued information flow on moose population trends required for management decisions by assessing calf and cow survival rates and calving rates. These demographic parameters are primary drivers of population trend and key research gaps identified from the initial 5-year (2013-2018) Provincial Moose Research Project.> Provincial (multi-region)
Estimating Cougar (Puma concolor vancouverensis) Populations on Northern Vancouver Island using DNA mark-recapture techniques Habitat Enhancement This project utilizes DNA-based mark-recapture inventory techniques and closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to create science-based cougar population estimates for Northern Vancouver Island. This project is properly designed, includes partnerships/stakeholders, and is science based, cost-effective and repeatable. Vancouver Island
West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project Habitat Enhancement The primary objective of this project is to re-establish viable Roosevelt Elk populations in wilderness areas of the West Coast Region while mitigating conflicts through translocation of elk from agricultural areas and along the highways of Vancouver Island, BC. Partnerships with community organizations, stakeholders, industry and First Nations governments, for translocations are key to facilitate recovery of this blue-listed species on Vancouver Island and are proven as instrumental on the mainland coast. Relocated herds will help improve ecosystem function and provide future opportunities for sustenance and recreational uses in new population units. Vancouver Island
Evaluating furbearer populations on southern Vancouver Island Habitat Enhancement This collaborative project is using non-invasive survey techniques to evaluate the distribution and abundance of Pacific martens, American minks, and Vancouver Island ermines, on southern Vancouver Island to help trappers and land managers maintain sustainable populations of these species. Vancouver Island
Conservation of Threatened Raptors on the Sunshine Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct surveys to identify and assess occupied breeding territories for Western Screech-Owls and Northern Goshawks on the Sunshine Coast, and work with government, First Nations, industry, and landowners to protect these areas. Complementary engagement activities will improve awareness and participation in raptor stewardship activities. Lower Mainland
Improving Wildlife Habitat in Logged and Fire-Damaged Coastal Forests Habitat Enhancement We will increase the quantity and quality of habitat for wetland-dependent wildlife on the Sunshine Coast by working with logging contractors and tenure holders to conserve wetlands during forestry operations, and to restore, enhance, and create wetlands in recently logged and fire-damaged forests. Lower Mainland
Sustaining mesocarnivore populations and habitat in the Lower Mainland watersheds Habitat Enhancement This project will use non-invasive survey techniques to evaluate the distribution, habitat use, and human-caused threats of mesocarnivore populations in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. This information is necessary to help trappers and land managers maintain sustainable populations in the Lower Mainland. Lower Mainland
Wolverine (Gulo gulo) movements, home range and habitat use in a human dominated landscape, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to examine home ranges, seasonal movements, and habitat use of wolverines in the South Coast. While inventories have been completed, further information is needed on movements, home range size, and habitat use in relation to human activities in order to better manage wolverines in a multiple use landscape. This proposal builds on the inventory and distribution data collected in HCTF Projects 2-519 and 2-600, and will help expand the pilot collaring study we will begin in February 2017. Lower Mainland
Improving Goshawk conservation by addressing knowledge-gaps in the South Coast Habitat Enhancement To investigate the efficacy of new telemetry technologies for addressing knowledge-gaps identified in the recovery strategy. Advancing our understanding of how Goshawks interact with their habitat will help enable us to implement meaningful conservation measures that address current threats to populations in the south coast region. Lower Mainland
Fisher Artificial Reproductive Den Box Study Habitat Enhancement Fisher are the largest obligate cavity user and use cavities in large diameter den trees for reproductive dens. Suitable trees for reproductive dens are rare in the landscape and impacts due to MPB and fire in many areas of the province have further reduced the availability of this habitat feature. This project will demonstrate the extent that artificial den boxes can be used to augment fisher reproductive denning habitat in areas where natural den trees have been reduced. Thompson - Nicola
Thompson Region Bighorn Sheep Collaring Project Habitat Enhancement This project aims to collar 30-33 bighorn sheep rams from different herds in the Thompson region to better quantify connectivity of Thompson bighorn sheep herds, as well as clarify core home range use, summer and winter range migration timing and movement rates and ram foray patterns. The project will also develop a herd health baseline dataset from biological samples from individuals in each herd. Thompson - Nicola
Boundary Restoration and Enhancement Program Habitat Enhancement This project will improve habitat quality, resiliency and forage availability for ungulates and other native species by restoring or enhancing degraded habitats in a range of ecosystems across the Boundary. This project will build community stewardship and technical capacity through the use of partnerships and local contractors. Kootenays
Kootenay Mule Deer Survival Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will assess factors limiting mule deer population growth in 4 study areas in the Kootenay Region by monitoring adult female survival, cause of death and fawn recruitment. Kootenays
Elk Valley Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Inventory Habitat Enhancement To monitor the population health and status of bighorn sheep along the east side of the Elk Valley. To provide data regarding habitat use and distribution to improve management of bighorn sheep.  Kootenays
West Kootenay Mule Deer Habitat Restoration Habitat Enhancement This project will identify important mule deer habitats in the West Kootenay and plan ecosystem restoration activities to improve quality of habitat. Kootenays
Bull River Bighorn Sheep: Herd Health and Movement Dynamics Habitat Enhancement This will be the third and final year for this project. A total of 15 GPS collars have been deployed with 1 mortality. This year we will compile and analyze 2 years of GPS collar data and compile herd health sampling results. A final report will be available at the end of the 2018-19 project year, unless more collars are deployed during the winter of 2017-18. There has been some uncertainty in the population estimate of the Bull River bighorn sheep with survey flights in 2017 (prior to collaring) indicating a 40% population decline. We may deploy up to 5 more collars during 2017-18 winter if new survey data suggests a larger population in order to sample a minimum of 17% of the herd. Kootenays
Invasive plant management on bighorn sheep winter ranges Habitat Enhancement This will be the third and final year for this project. A total of 15 GPS collars have been deployed with 1 mortality. This year we will compile and analyze 2 years of GPS collar data and compile herd health sampling results. A final report will be available at the end of the 2018-19 project year, unless more collars are deployed during the winter of 2017-18. There has been some uncertainty in the population estimate of the Bull River bighorn sheep with survey flights in 2017 (prior to collaring) indicating a 40% population decline. We may deploy up to 5 more collars during 2017-18 winter if new survey data suggests a larger population in order to sample a minimum of 17% of the herd. Kootenays
Longevity of Woody Debris Habitat Structures for Prey Species of Furbearers: Ghost-towns or Viable Habitat? Habitat Enhancement Piles and windrows of woody debris on new clear-cuts provide corridors to assist marten, small weasels, and some larger carnivores to cross forest openings. Small mammal prey species are also enhanced in these structures. We ask if these responses of prey species are maintained at 11-12 years after these restoration habitats were constructed. Kootenays
Diversifying MPB Clear-cuts for Small Mustelids: Green-tree Retention, Debris Piles, and Enhanced Riparian Habitats. Habitat Enhancement Restoration of wildlife habitat with combined habitat components after clear-cut harvesting of MPB-killed lodgepole pine stands. Three methods of habitat enhancement for small mustelids and their prey species to diversify clear-cuts include (1) green-tree retention, (2) woody debris piles, and (3) enhanced riparian zones. Kootenays
Predicting grizzly bear foods – Huckleberries across the Kootenays Habitat Enhancement This project will expand our previous project that accurately predicted grizzly bears’ most important regional food resource – huckleberries - across most of the Kootenay region. Between 2013-2016 we developed an accurate predictive model for huckleberry patches-important-to-grizzly-bears in the south Selkirk and Purcell Mts. This project will expand that model into the east and north Kootenays, the Central Purcell and Selkirks, the Valhalla, and Granby regions. Our huckleberry patch model is already being used by resource managers to plan timber harvest and protect important berry patches through access controls. There is a strong demand for this model to be expanded regionally for these same purposes. Kootenays
Quantify rates and mechanisms of grizzly bear mortality Habitat Enhancement Use radio telemetry to identify the rates and causes of bear mortality (reported and unreported) in a population of bears facing one of the highest human-caused mortality rates in the province. Currently, the degree of under-reporting is unknown and suspected to be high, and these uncertainties compromise science-based management of grizzly bears locally and provincially. This project builds on a large body of research and previously collected data to provide recommendations for pressing management concerns and to engage the community in grizzly bear conservation. Kootenays
Enhancing wolf monitoring with bioacoustics in the East Kootenays. Habitat Enhancement The project objective is to develop a cost‐effective survey method to measure wolf abundance and trend in the Kootenay-Boundary Region by assessing the effectiveness of bioacoustics and comparing it with established methods, such as camera-trap based occupancy. Kootenays
Quantifying and enhancing pest services provided by bats to the BC Timber Industry Habitat Enhancement This project focuses on scoping methods and costs to enhance and quantify pest services provided by bats to the forest industry. The project's goals include: (1) Identifying the pest services provided by bats to the forest industry and (2) Testing new enhancement methods that could be used by the forest industry to re-establish bat roosts where roosts are limiting or have been impacted by forest practices.  Kootenays
Maintenance of Furbearers and Prey Species on Large Clear-cut Openings Using Linear Piles of Woody Debris Habitat Enhancement This proposal is designed to investigate the responses of small mustelids and their prey species to piles of woody debris arranged in a linear configuration across large (50+ ha) clear-cut openings. Presence of these mammals in piles will indicate that these structures are effective as habitat in large clear-cut openings. Kootenays
Monitoring white-tailed deer to support adaptive caribou management Habitat Enhancement The majority of caribou herds in western Canada are declining, largely due to increased predator abundance supported by invading moose and white-tailed deer. Our project will evaluate factors influencing white-tailed deer populations to support mountain caribou management decisions. Kootenays
Restoring Ungulate Habitat Through Clumpy Spacing Habitat Enhancement A clumpy-spacing trial was installed in 1990 to examine habitat enhancement for ungulates (deer winter range) through a unique spacing regime of overstocked stands of juvenile trees. This project will evaluate whether clumping spacing enhanced habitat use by ungulates and regionally-important wildlife. Cariboo
Ecology of small mammals in post-fire and salvage-logged landscapes Habitat Enhancement Fires and post-fire salvage-logging have unknown but likely significant impacts on small mammals, which are important prey species for forest carnivores. This project will quantify abundances and distribution of mice and voles, snowshoe hares, and red squirrels in response to these disturbances west of Williams Lake, where we are conducting concurrent work on marten. Cariboo
Recreation and land use impacts on South Chilcotin Mountains wildlife Habitat Enhancement We will use camera trapping and advanced statistical analyses to untangle the relative impacts of environmental factors and human activities on the distribution and abundance of key wildlife species (e.g., grizzly bears, mountain goats). The results will help managers and stakeholders assess how human activities impact the area's wildlife. Cariboo
Sheep Flats Ecosystem Restoration Habitat Enhancement This one year project will restore important California Bighorn Sheep habitat in Churn Creek Protected Area by removing tree encroachment and ingrowth from Sheep Flats grasslands and forests.  Cariboo
Assessing cougar density in The Cariboo Region through non-invasive survey techniques Habitat Enhancement A mark-recapture DNA science-based project utilizing closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to estimate cougar population densities in a study area of region 5. This project will incorporate a citizen science component for estimating cougar populations by including stakeholders. Cariboo
Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat Habitat Enhancement This is yr 2 in the 2nd 5-yr cycle of a multiparter project to restore endangered whitebark pine ecosystems with high value for bears in the southern Skeena Region. 2018-19 plans include (1) a major seed collection; (2) stratifying >20000 seeds (3) rust-resistance screening; (4) monitoring 2017 plantings; and (4) capacity-building and outreach. Skeena
Moose Fund: Skeena Moose Enhancement Project Habitat Enhancement 2018/2019: The second year of the Skeena Moose Enhancement Project will consist of developing a moose habitat enhancement manual that provides a comprehensive evaluation of enhancement options available with detailed descriptions of the techniques including planning, implementation and monitoring phases. Skeena
Moose Winter Range Willow Browse Enhancement Habitat Enhancement Mature willow felling/hinging to promote moose forage production. Skeena
Assessing Impact on Moose Winter Habitat by Poplar and Willow Borer Habitat Enhancement The extent of the poplar and willow borer infestation in BC has not been assessed since 1999 and implications on moose habitat have not been investigated despite the overlap with declining moose populations over the past decade. This project will examine the current distribution of the poplar and willow borer and the species'' impact to moose winter habitat in the Skeena Region. Skeena
Enhancing caribou survival within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds Habitat Enhancement This will be Year 5 of 5 planned years during which maternal penning will be used as one of several complementary emergency measures implemented to avert extirpation, and eventually recover, the population of caribou known as the Klinse-Za/Scott herds located in the south Peace region of northern British Columbia. Omineca/Peace
Wolf predation risk to moose in north-central BC Habitat Enhancement This project would investigate seasonal wolf predation risk to moose in two of the provincial moose research project study sites. We would track kill sites of up to 10 wolf packs in each site by deploying satellite collars and checking location clusters for evidence and type of prey killed, while also determining space use parameters and resource selection. Omineca/Peace
Chase Caribou Herd Response to Extensive Habitat Alterations - Year 2 Habitat Enhancement This project will assess the potential impacts of recent large-scale habitat alterations caused by damaged forests (wildfire and mountain pine beetle) on the population stability of the Chase caribou herd. We will contrast current population parameters (i.e., seasonal range use, habitat use/selection, mortality causes, and calf recruitment) to population parameters of the herd prior to recent disturbance. Omineca/Peace
Boreal Caribou Habitat Restoration in the Liard River Basin Habitat Enhancement This project builds on Fort Nelson First Nation's 2017 Boreal Caribou Action Plan to identify high priority areas for habitat restoration in the Liard River basin, an area which includes four of the five identified boreal caribou ranges in British Columbia. A detailed restoration plan, including site-specific prescriptions, will developed for one of these areas. Implementation in a pilot area (up to 1,000 ha), is targeted for 2019. The result of this work will be ongoing active restoration of the legacy industry footprint in boreal caribou habitat in the Liard Basin, and ongoing monitoring to determine how effective this work is for reversing boreal caribou population declines. Omineca/Peace
KlinseZa/Scott East Caribou Maternal Pen Health Evaluation Habitat Enhancement The Klinse-Za maternal penning project helped reverse the population decline in the herd. However, capturing and penning wild caribou has direct and indirect health consequences and little is known of their health overall. In this project, we propose to evaluate the baseline health characteristics of this herd, as well as identify positive and negative health effects of penning, across four key parameters: disease, stress, body condition, and diet. Omineca/Peace
Sharp-tailed Grouse Population and Lek Habitat Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will re-initiate the monitoring of sharp-tailed grouse populations in the North, and will quantify habitat characteristics of lek sites. Results of this project will contribute to management of the species and provide guidance to industrial proponents to minimize impacts to sharp-tailed grouse. Omineca/Peace
Determining the value of post-fire landscapes for American marten Habitat Enhancement American marten are important furbearers in BC, but strategies to facilitate marten recovery post-fire have not been established. Our proposal addresses marten population and behavioral responses to fire and post-fire salvage- logging to identify post-fire management decisions most likely to meet management goals. Okanagan
Mule deer response to wildfire and habitat in southern British Columbia Habitat Enhancement Identify the effect of wildfire on mule deer habitat selection and population growth in the Boundary Region, West Okanagan, and Bonaparte Plateau areas of British Columbia, and provide management tools and recommendations to increase mule deer abundance. Okanagan
Project Title Society Purpose Project Description Location
2019-2020 Co-Funded Projects - FESBC / HCTF
Got Bats? B.C. Community Outreach, Conservation and Citizen Science Project Habitat Enhancement "Got Bats?" is a network of community bat projects across BC that promotes bat conservation through the detection and protection of bat roosts, education to counter negative attitudes towards bats, enhancement of habitat including installation of bat‐houses, and a province‐wide Citizen Science bat count to engage the public and detect population declines due to White-nose Syndrome and other threats. Implemented by local, established stewardship organizations with direct landowner contacts in each region, the importance of this initiative has been widely recognized by the BC Government and BC Bat Action Team, and support for the program is a high priority action item in the BC Bat Action Plan (BC Bat Action Team, 2016). Multi-Region
Monitoring and Protecting BC''s bat diversity prior to White-Nose Syndrome Habitat Enhancement White-nose Syndrome continues to devastate eastern bat populations, and is found in Washington state in the west. We will continue to work with cavers and other citizen scientists to identify important bat habitats, and establish baseline species diversity and relative abundance -- reference points necessary for future monitoring, surveillance, mitigation, and recovery. Multi-Region
Rattlesnake populations: Response to land management regimes and historical changes. Habitat Enhancement This project revisits the ecology of populations of Western Rattlesnakes (a species-at-risk) originally studied over 30 years ago. The main questions being addressed are (i) how have snake populations changed over 30+ years, and (ii) how do different management regimes affect these changes? Given that data of this type are practically nonexistent, this project will provide important new data for assessing how landscape use and attributes affect these animals. Multi-Region
Developing a prophylactic probiotic approach for reducing white-nose syndrome severity in bats Habitat Enhancement Using bacteria sourced from local healthy bats, we have derived a probiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of white-nose syndrome (WNS), the fungal disease poised to devastate western North American bat populations. Now that we have successfully tested this probiotic on captive building-roosting bats, we have concluded that it is effective at changing bat wing microbiomes and slows the growth of the fungus (referred to as Pd) which causes this deadly bat disease, readying us for a final captive trial then field implementation in 2019. At maternity roosts in the Vancouver region we will compare bat ecology and health pre- and post-treatment prior to when bats leave to hibernation with an enhanced anti-WNS wing flora which we anticipate will delay or prevent Pd growth for a long enough portion of the winter to increase survivorship. Multi-Region
Fisher Habitat Conservation – Extension and Field Trials Habitat Enhancement This project strives to increase the ability of foresters and forest workers to improve habitat outcomes for fishers in their operations and inspire them to include habitat needs of fishers in their forest management decisions. Multi-Region
Determining factors affecting moose population change: assessing calving and survival rates Habitat Enhancement This project will enable new and continued information flow on moose population trends required for management decisions by assessing calf and cow survival rates and calving rates. These demographic parameters are primary drivers of population trend and key research gaps identified from the initial 5-year (2013-2018) Provincial Moose Research Project. Multi-Region
Using Local Knowledge and Hunter-based Sampling to Inform Mountain Caribou Conservation Habitat Enhancement We will fill knowledge gaps on health status and population trends of Northern Mountain caribou herds in BC through rigorous documentation of guide-outfitter knowledge and analyzing biological samples from harvested caribou. Concurrently, we will work with communities to develop capacity and a framework for community-based monitoring of wildlife health, status and trends. Multi-Region
Estimating Cougar (Puma concolor vancouverensis) Populations on Northern Vancouver Island using DNA mark-recapture techniques Habitat Enhancement This project utilizes DNA-based mark-recapture inventory techniques and closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to create science-based cougar population estimates for Northern Vancouver Island. This project is properly designed, includes partnerships/stakeholders, and is science based, cost-effective and repeatable. Vancouver Island
West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project Habitat Enhancement The primary objective of this project is to re-establish viable Roosevelt Elk populations in wilderness areas of the West Coast Region while mitigating conflicts through translocation of elk from agricultural areas and along the highways of Vancouver Island, BC. Partnerships with community organizations, stakeholders, industry and First Nations governments, for translocations are key to facilitate recovery of this blue-listed species on Vancouver Island and are proven as instrumental on the mainland coast. Relocated herds will help improve ecosystem function and provide future opportunities for sustenance and recreational uses in new population units. Vancouver Island
Seasonal habitat supply for the management and restoration of Roosevelt Elk Habitat Enhancement We will deploy over 60 GPS collars on Roosevelt Elk on Vancouver Island to validate an existing winter habitat model and develop habitat models for all seasons to quantify the relationship between habitat use and elk populations. Project outcomes will improve elk habitat and population management decisions. Vancouver Island
Reestablishing Vancouver Island Marmots in Strathcona Provincial Park Habitat Enhancement The Marmot Recovery Foundation will build and extend on efforts to reintroduce Vancouver Island Marmots to Strathcona Provincial Park, and create a self-sustaining population of the endemic mammals. Efforts will focus on translocations, food enhancement, monitoring and potentially habitat restoration as guided by BC Parks. Vancouver Island
South Coast Grizzly Bear Ecology and Cumulative Effects Research Habitat Enhancement This project is investigating several aspects of grizzly bear ecology, with a focus on space-use and movements relative to influential factors of habitat and human activity. Inferences will be directly relevant to understanding short- and long-term implications of cumulative human impacts on grizzly bear recovery and conservation. >Data will also contribute to long-term tracking of population responses. Predictive outputs that are empirically tested will serve to direct appropriate mitigation and conservation strategies. Lower Mainland
Conservation of Threatened Raptors on the Sunshine Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct surveys to identify and assess occupied breeding territories for Northern Goshawks on the Sunshine Coast, and will work with government, First Nations, industry, and landowners to protect habitat for Goshawks and other raptors. Community engagement activities will improve awareness and participation in raptor stewardship. Lower Mainland
Improving Wildlife Habitat in Logged and Fire-Damaged Coastal Forests Habitat Enhancement We will increase the quantity and quality of habitat for wetland-dependent wildlife on the Sunshine Coast by working with logging contractors and tenure holders to conserve, restore, enhance, and create wetlands in recently logged and fire-damaged forests. Lower Mainland
Wolverine (Gulo gulo) movements, home range and habitat use in a human dominated landscape, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to examine home ranges, seasonal movements, and habitat use of wolverines in the South Coast. While inventories have been completed, further information is needed on movements, home range size, and habitat use in relation to human activities in order to better manage wolverines in a multiple use landscape. This proposal builds on the inventory and distribution data collected in HCTF Projects 2-519 and 2-600. Lower Mainland
Mountain Goat Seasonal Movements and Habitat Use in the Mount Meager Complex, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to radio collar (GPS) 35-45 mountain goats in the Mount Meager Complex. The objectives are to determine if these goats make large seasonal movements to and from winter ranges, as well as quantify habitat use in winter and summer in relation to the burned habitats. As this is a hunted population and perhaps one of the largest and most important goat populations in the South Coast, this information on seasonal movements and habitat use is crucial in our understanding of how to better manage this population. Lower Mainland
Roosevelt Elk Inventory - South Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct inventory of Roosevelt Elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) in the South Coast Region, through annual aerial flights. This project will generate population estimates for each unit surveyed and results will lead to improved conservation, management and planning. Lower Mainland
Thompson Region Bighorn Sheep Collaring Project Habitat Enhancement This project aims to collar 30-33 bighorn sheep rams from different herds in the Thompson region to better quantify connectivity of Thompson bighorn sheep herds, as well as clarify core home range use, summer and winter range migration timing and movement rates and ram foray patterns. The project will also develop a herd health baseline dataset from biological samples from individuals in each herd. Thompson - Nicola
Monitoring the Stein/Nahatlatch Grizzly Bear Population during Recovery. Habitat Enhancement This isolated and Critically Endangered grizzly bear population has been monitored using DNA sampling since 2005. To avoid an extended break in this continuity, we plan to continue the monitoring as the Province implements recovery actions every two years. The project is structured consistent with the spirit of Reconciliation and with the principals of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) “to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions”. Thompson - Nicola
South Rockies Grizzly Bear Inventory Habitat Enhancement We have been monitoring grizzly bear population trend in wildlife management units 4-01, 4-02, and 4-23 since 2006. Analysis has informed management decisions such as adjusting hunting quotas based on recent field-based population estimates, closing the hunting season in the South Rockies GBPU after a period of population decline, and planning access closures near huckleberry patches in 4-23. We now intend to focus on understanding and mitigating the causes of non-hunting mortality, especially when it is not reported nor recorded in the provincial mortality data and, monitor the recovery from the recent population decline. Kootenays
Boundary Restoration and Enhancement Program Habitat Enhancement This project will improve habitat quality, resiliency and forage availability for ungulates and other native species by restoring or enhancing degraded habitats in a range of ecosystems across the Boundary. This project will build community stewardship and technical capacity through the use of partnerships and local contractors. Kootenays
Kootenay Mule Deer Survival Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will assess factors limiting mule deer population growth in 4 study areas in the Kootenay Region by monitoring adult female survival, cause of death and fawn recruitment. Kootenays
Bull River Bighorn Sheep: Herd Health and Movement Dynamics Habitat Enhancement This proposal is to support the ongoing deployment of GPS collars as they continue to function and provide movement data and the potential for mortality investigations. There are 9/11 collars remaining on the Bull River herd, and 3/4 remaining on the Galton herd. The continued data fees and monitoring costs to maintain these 12 collars on bighorn sheep within these two herds is warranted given the 40% population decline in the Bull River herd, and the continued concern over contact with domestic sheep in both the Bull River and Galton herd ranges. Kootenays
Invasive plant management on bighorn sheep winter ranges Habitat Enhancement This proposed project involves a comprehensive and collaborative approach to managing invasive plants on 3 critical bighorn sheep winter ranges: Bull River, Wigwam Flats and Columbia Lake East. This proposed continuing project is attempting to increase the quality of grasslands by reducing invaders and increasing forage species. Kootenays
Diversifying MPB Clearcuts for Small Mustelids: Green-tree Retention, Debris Piles, and Enhanced Riparian habitats Habitat Enhancement Restoration of wildlife habitat with combined habitat components after clearcut harvesting of MPB-killed lodgepole pine stands. Three methods of habitat enhancement for small mustelids and their prey species to diversify clearcuts include (1) green-tree retention, (2) woody debris piles, and (3) enhanced riparian zones. Kootenays
Quantifying rates and mechanisms of grizzly bear mortality in the Elk Valley Habitat Enhancement Use radiotelemetry to identify the rates and causes of bear mortality (reported and unreported) in a population of bears facing one of the highest human-caused mortality rates in the province. Currently, the degree of under-reporting is unknown and suspected to be high, and these uncertainties compromise science-based management of grizzly bears locally and provincially. This project builds on a large body of research and previously collected data to provide recommendations for pressing management concerns and to engage the community in grizzly bear conservation. Kootenays
Maintenance of Furbearers and Prey Species on Large Clearcut Openings Using Linear Piles of Woody Debris Habitat Enhancement This proposal is designed to investigate the responses of small mustelids and their prey species to piles of woody debris arranged in a linear configuration across large (50+ ha) clearcut openings. Presence of these mammals in piles will indicate that these structures are effective as habitat in large clearcut openings. Kootenays
Elk movements and survival in the Elk Valley Habitat Enhancement Elk in the Elk Valley appear to have changed migration patterns in recent years. Productivity and survival of non-migratory and migratory elk in the Elk Valley may differ. This study examines elk movements and survival in the Elk Valley and will provide information to help make informed wildlife management decisions. Kootenays
Evaluating grizzly conservation management: quantifying recovery in the South Selkirks Habitat Enhancement This project is a unique opportunity to quantifiably evaluate 15 years of conservation activities recovering a threatened grizzly bear population in the South Selkirks using a DNA-based population survey. The results will allow BC’s first detailed, scientifically documented recovery process (from problem & solutions identification to solutions implementation, to realized conservation return) that will provide valuable input to the developing BC Grizzly Bear Management Plan. Our results will also inform conservation management of grizzly bear populations across BC by providing a blueprint for managing stressed grizzly bear populations. Kootenays
Premier Lake Park & adjacent Crown land Prescribed Burn Habitat Enhancement In partnership with the Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society (RMTS) and the Rocky Mountain Trench Ecosystem Restoration Program (RMTERP) and the BC Wildfire Service (BCWS), BC Parks will be conducting a 300 ha prescribed burn on 150 ha of park land as well as 150 ha of adjacent Crown land in the spring of 2019. This project aims to enhance habitat for wildlife in the Premier Lake Park area and on adjacent Crown land by restoring grassland and open forest habitats. Restoration of grasslands and open forests contributes to the region''s rich biodiversity by providing habitat for a wealth of wildlife species, many of which are at risk because habitat has been lost or degraded. Kootenays
Restoring Ungulate Habitat Through Clumpy Spacing Habitat Enhancement A clumpy-spacing trial was installed in 1990 to examine habitat enhancement for ungulates (deer winter range) through a unique spacing regime of overstocked stands of juvenile trees. This project will evaluate whether clumping spacing enhanced habitat use by ungulates and regionally-important wildlife. Cariboo
Ecology of small mammals in post-fire and salvage-logged landscapes Habitat Enhancement Fires and post-fire salvage-logging have unknown but likely significant impacts on small mammals, which are important prey species for forest carnivores. This project will quantify abundances and distribution of mice and voles, snowshoe hares, and red squirrels in response to these disturbances west of Williams Lake, where we are conducting concurrent work on marten. Cariboo
Assessing cougar density in The Cariboo Region through non-invasive survey techniques Habitat Enhancement A mark-recapture DNA science-based project utilizing closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to estimate cougar population densities in a study area of region 5. This project will incorporate a citizen science component for estimating cougar populations by including stakeholders. Cariboo
Assessing high-elevation forest harvesting strategies to maintain caribou and moose habitat Habitat Enhancement This is a two-year study designed to understand the use of high-elevation forestry blocks by moose, caribou, wolves and bears. We will assess differences in the distribution and abundance of moose and their predators across an adaptive management trial with conventional (>25ha) and small (<1.0ha) clearcuts as well as an unharvested control. This study will provide guidance to land managers attempting to limit apparent competition between moose and caribou, however, the results could be applied to efforts to enhance moose habitat across portions of the province where caribou and moose are not spatially adjacent. Cariboo
Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat Habitat Enhancement This is year 3 in the 2nd 5-yr cycle of a multi-partner project to restore endangered whitebark pine ecosystems with high value habitat value for bears in the southern Skeena Region. 2019-2020 plans include: (1) prepare a plan to optimally use the large whitebark pine seed collection made in 2018; (2) monitor 2014 and 2017 restoration plantings; (3) complete 5th research report on whitebark pine assisted migration trial (2012-2013 plantings); (4) continue outreach and extension activities including installation of an interpretive sign on Hudson Bay Mtn. Skeena
Determining Population Management Unit Boundaries for Mountain Goats in Skeena Region Habitat Enhancement We will monitor movements, home ranges, habitat selection and genetic relatedness of mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) on three adjacent mountain complexes northeast of Smithers, BC to determine biologically meaningful population management unit boundaries for these populations; results of this study can help to inform biologically based PMUs in the remainder of the Skeena Region. Skeena
Tahltan Burn Plan Habitat Enhancement We would like to develop a burn plan and schedule for identified critical habitat areas within the Tahltan Territory. Through community meetings and discussions with individuals within the local Tahltan communities we have identified areas that would benefit from habitat enhancement burning for moose, Stone’s sheep and mountian goat populations within the Tahltan Territory. Precipitation monitoring has shown an increase in rain during the growing seasons and a reduction in snow packs over the last decade. This has lead to a changing land scape across the Tahltan territory. There has been encroachment of evergreen and deciduous trees into the alpine and open areas reducing ungulate food sources. There has also been an increase in willow and alder growth in many areas. We are looking to incorporate a more pro-active approach to enhancing wildlife populations within our territory. The Tahltan Central Government has invested significant amounts of it’s own resources into our wildlife and lands programs but we do not have the capacity at the moment to deliver a burn program without assistance from outside sources. Through this project we would like to build the capacity to develop projects internally. Skeena
CHRF Whitesail Reach Habitat Enhancement This restoration project is designed to benefit the Tweedsmuir-Entiako caribou herd by clearing debris from the shore line of calving islands on Whitesail Lake. Skeena
CHRF Tweedsmuir – Entiako Caribou Lichen Restoration Habitat Enhancement This restoration project is designed to benefit the Tweedsmuir-Entiako herd by seeding lichen fragments over 50 ha in areas impacted by Chelaslie wildfire. Skeena
Enhancing caribou survival within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds Habitat Enhancement This will be Year 6 of the maternal penning project that is used as one of several complementary emergency measures implemented to avert extirpation, and eventually recover, the population of caribou known as the Klinse-Za/Scott herds located in the south Peace region of northern British Columbia. Omineca/Peace
Tuchodi Prescribed Burns for Wildlife Habitat Habitat Enhancement The Tuchodi Prescribed Burn Program seeks to support critical winter range for multiple ungulate species in northern British Columbia by improving the quantity and nutritional quality of forage in winter range habitats. By restoring early-seral habitats and rejuvenating mid-seral habitats, the program will ensure the long-term sustainability of ungulate populations, maintain hunting and recreational opportunities, and support traditional use of wildlife by First Nations. Omineca/Peace
Wolf predation risk to moose in north-central BC Habitat Enhancement This project investigates seasonal wolf predation risk to moose in two of the provincial moose research project study sites. We track kill sites of up to 10 wolf packs in each site by deploying satellite collars and checking location clusters for evidence and type of prey killed, while also determining space use parameters and resource selection. Omineca/Peace
Chase Caribou Herd Response to Extensive Habitat Alterations Habitat Enhancement This project will assess the potential impacts of recent large-scale habitat alterations caused by damaged forests (wildfire and mountain pine beetle) on the population stability of the Chase caribou herd. We will contrast current population parameters (i.e., seasonal range use, habitat use/selection, mortality causes, and calf recruitment) to population parameters of the herd prior to recent disturbance. Omineca/Peace
KlinseZa/Scott East Caribou Maternal Pen Health Evaluation Habitat Enhancement Emergency recovery measures have led to improved outcomes for the demographics of the threatened Klinse-Za herd in north-central BC, but the effects of this intensive and invasive management on individual and herd health have just begun to be investigated. In year 1 of this project, we formed collaborations with wildlife health experts, and are submitting health samples for laboratory analyses addressing various metrics of stress, nutrition, pathogens, and body condition; a summary database and report are planned for end of the fiscal year. In this 2nd year, we propose to submit 2019 penning samples for labwork, analyze the laboratory results, and interpret the findings; in the third year, to submit a peer-reviewed publication. Omineca/Peace
Sharp-tailed Grouse Population and Lek Habitat Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will re-initiate the monitoring of sharp-tailed grouse populations in the North Peace and produce a complete reproductive season habitat model. Results of this project will determine population status, increase knowledge of the sub-species, contribute to management of the species and provide guidance to industrial proponents. Omineca/Peace
Linking forest condition, heat stress, and moose health Habitat Enhancement Moose cope poorly with heat and must seek thermal shelter during periods of heat stress. However, recourse to thermal shelter logically requires that it be in sufficient supply. The purpose of this study is to investigate the thermal environment in a region where Mountain Pine Beetle salvage logging has radically shifted the landscape to an early-seral condition. Operative temperature will be measured in common forest types to determine the a) gravity of thermal stress in this landscape and b) extent to which it is under management control. Omineca/Peace
Implications of bear demography on recovery of the Klinse-Za caribou herd Habitat Enhancement This seed project will result in a collaboratively developed, multi-year funding proposal to address information gaps in black and grizzly bear demography, distribution, and diets; particularly in relation to the implementation of caribou recovery measures in the Klinse-Za caribou herd. Omineca/Peace
Evaluating elk population trend, habitat use, and potential for competition with moose in the southern central Omineca Habitat Enhancement Female elk will be collared in the southern Omineca around Prince George and monitored to determine survival rate, calf recruitment and population trends as baseline information. Resource selection will determine habitat use to inform elk management regionally where extensive mountain pine beetle salvage has occurred. Collared elk will allow regional staff to develop a refined sightability correction factor to facilitate accurate abundance estimates. Omineca/Peace
Canada Lynx habitat ecology on an intensively harvested landscape. Habitat Enhancement Using a combination of GPS collars and non-invasive survey techniques we will investigate the habitat ecology and population status of Canada lynx in an intensively harvested landscape in central BC. The aim of this study is to provide applied recommendations for habitat and species management as well as improve monitoring methods for Canada lynx in a rapidly changing landscape. Omineca/Peace
Northern Myotis Maternal Roost Study Habitat Enhancement Locate and describe biophysical attributes of maternal colonies of the federally endangered northern myotis (often multiple trees within a geographic area) through capture and radio telemetry to inform 1) understanding and identification of critical habitat as recommended in the species recovery strategy (Environment Canada 2015), 2) contribute to the develop of a habitat management tool for industry 3) provide information to contribute to WHA designation should the re-assessment of Identified Wildlife include northern myotis, 4) contribute to mitigation for habitat loss such as creation of wildlife habitat trees with collaborators. Omineca/Peace
Little Bobtail Wildfire Ecosystem Restoration Plan – Riparian Planting Habitat Enhancement The Society for Ecosystem Restoration in Northern BC (SERNbc) has identified an opportunity to improve riparian ecosystem functioning impacted by the Little Bobtail wildfire in 2015. As part of a broader Ecosystem Restoration Plan (ERP) already completed, this project seeks to plant 37,000 trees across 48 hectares of burned riparian areas critical to local fish and wildlife populations. Omineca/Peace
CHRF Kotcho Lake Restoration Area Habitat Enhancement This project is designed to benefit the SnakeSahtahneh caribou herd by limiting predator use of legacy seismic lines and using re-vegetation to increase habitat suitability for caribou. Omineca/Peace
Mule deer response to wildfire and habitat change in southern British Columbia Habitat Enhancement Identify the effect of wildfire on mule deer habitat selection and population growth in the Boundary Region, West Okanagan, and Bonaparte Plateau areas of British Columbia, and provide management tools and recommendations to increase mule deer abundance. Okanagan
Project Title Society Purpose Project Description Location
2020-2021 Co-Funded Projects - FESBC / HCTF
Got Bats? B.C. Community Outreach, Conservation and Citizen Science Project Habitat Enhancement "Got Bats?" is a network of community bat projects across BC that promotes bat conservation through the detection and protection of bat roosts, education to counter negative attitudes towards bats, enhancement of habitat including installation of bat‐houses, and a province‐wide Citizen Science bat count to engage the public and detect population declines due to White-nose Syndrome and other threats. Implemented by local, established stewardship organizations with direct landowner contacts in each region, the importance of this initiative has been widely recognized by the BC Government and BC Bat Action Team, and support for the program is a high priority action item in the BC Bat Action Plan (BC Bat Action Team, 2016). Multi-Region
Monitoring and Protecting BC''s bat diversity prior to White-Nose Syndrome Habitat Enhancement White-nose Syndrome continues to devastate eastern bat populations, and is found in Washington state in the west. We will continue to work with cavers and other citizen scientists to identify important bat habitats, and establish baseline species diversity and relative abundance -- reference points necessary for future monitoring, surveillance, mitigation, and recovery. Multi-Region
Rattlesnake populations: Response to land management regimes and historical changes. Habitat Enhancement This project revisits the ecology of populations of Western Rattlesnakes (a species-at-risk) originally studied over 30 years ago. The main questions being addressed are (i) how have snake populations changed over 30+ years, and (ii) how do different management regimes affect these changes? Given that data of this type are practically nonexistent, this project will provide important new data for assessing how landscape use and attributes affect these animals. Multi-Region
Developing a prophylactic probiotic approach for reducing white-nose syndrome severity in bats Habitat Enhancement Using bacteria sourced from local healthy bats, we have derived a probiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of white-nose syndrome (WNS), the fungal disease poised to devastate western North American bat populations. Now that we have successfully tested this probiotic on captive building-roosting bats, we have concluded that it is effective at changing bat wing microbiomes and slows the growth of the fungus (referred to as Pd) which causes this deadly bat disease, readying us for a final captive trial then field implementation in 2019. At maternity roosts in the Vancouver region we will compare bat ecology and health pre- and post-treatment prior to when bats leave to hibernation with an enhanced anti-WNS wing flora which we anticipate will delay or prevent Pd growth for a long enough portion of the winter to increase survivorship. Multi-Region
Fisher Habitat Conservation – Extension and Field Trials Habitat Enhancement This project strives to increase the ability of foresters and forest workers to improve habitat outcomes for fishers in their operations and inspire them to include habitat needs of fishers in their forest management decisions. Multi-Region
Determining factors affecting moose population change: assessing calving and survival rates Habitat Enhancement This project will enable new and continued information flow on moose population trends required for management decisions by assessing calf and cow survival rates and calving rates. These demographic parameters are primary drivers of population trend and key research gaps identified from the initial 5-year (2013-2018) Provincial Moose Research Project. Multi-Region
Using Local Knowledge and Hunter-based Sampling to Inform Mountain Caribou Conservation Habitat Enhancement We will fill knowledge gaps on health status and population trends of Northern Mountain caribou herds in BC through rigorous documentation of guide-outfitter knowledge and analyzing biological samples from harvested caribou. Concurrently, we will work with communities to develop capacity and a framework for community-based monitoring of wildlife health, status and trends. Multi-Region
Estimating Cougar (Puma concolor vancouverensis) Populations on Northern Vancouver Island using DNA mark-recapture techniques Habitat Enhancement This project utilizes DNA-based mark-recapture inventory techniques and closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to create science-based cougar population estimates for Northern Vancouver Island. This project is properly designed, includes partnerships/stakeholders, and is science based, cost-effective and repeatable. Vancouver Island
West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project Habitat Enhancement The primary objective of this project is to re-establish viable Roosevelt Elk populations in wilderness areas of the West Coast Region while mitigating conflicts through translocation of elk from agricultural areas and along the highways of Vancouver Island, BC. Partnerships with community organizations, stakeholders, industry and First Nations governments, for translocations are key to facilitate recovery of this blue-listed species on Vancouver Island and are proven as instrumental on the mainland coast. Relocated herds will help improve ecosystem function and provide future opportunities for sustenance and recreational uses in new population units. Vancouver Island
Seasonal habitat supply for the management and restoration of Roosevelt Elk Habitat Enhancement We will deploy over 60 GPS collars on Roosevelt Elk on Vancouver Island to validate an existing winter habitat model and develop habitat models for all seasons to quantify the relationship between habitat use and elk populations. Project outcomes will improve elk habitat and population management decisions. Vancouver Island
Reestablishing Vancouver Island Marmots in Strathcona Provincial Park Habitat Enhancement The Marmot Recovery Foundation will build and extend on efforts to reintroduce Vancouver Island Marmots to Strathcona Provincial Park, and create a self-sustaining population of the endemic mammals. Efforts will focus on translocations, food enhancement, monitoring and potentially habitat restoration as guided by BC Parks. Vancouver Island
South Coast Grizzly Bear Ecology and Cumulative Effects Research Habitat Enhancement This project is investigating several aspects of grizzly bear ecology, with a focus on space-use and movements relative to influential factors of habitat and human activity. Inferences will be directly relevant to understanding short- and long-term implications of cumulative human impacts on grizzly bear recovery and conservation. Data will also contribute to long-term tracking of population responses. Predictive outputs that are empirically tested will serve to direct appropriate mitigation and conservation strategies. Lower Mainland
Conservation of Threatened Raptors on the Sunshine Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct surveys to identify and assess occupied breeding territories for Northern Goshawks on the Sunshine Coast, and will work with government, First Nations, industry, and landowners to protect habitat for Goshawks and other raptors. Community engagement activities will improve awareness and participation in raptor stewardship. Lower Mainland
Improving Wildlife Habitat in Logged and Fire-Damaged Coastal Forests Habitat Enhancement We will increase the quantity and quality of habitat for wetland-dependent wildlife on the Sunshine Coast by working with logging contractors and tenure holders to conserve, restore, enhance, and create wetlands in recently logged and fire-damaged forests. Lower Mainland
Wolverine (Gulo gulo) movements, home range and habitat use in a human dominated landscape, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to examine home ranges, seasonal movements, and habitat use of wolverines in the South Coast. While inventories have been completed, further information is needed on movements, home range size, and habitat use in relation to human activities in order to better manage wolverines in a multiple use landscape. This proposal builds on the inventory and distribution data collected in HCTF Projects 2-519 and 2-600. Lower Mainland
Mountain Goat Seasonal Movements and Habitat Use in the Mount Meager Complex, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to radio collar (GPS) 35-45 mountain goats in the Mount Meager Complex. The objectives are to determine if these goats make large seasonal movements to and from winter ranges, as well as quantify habitat use in winter and summer in relation to the burned habitats. As this is a hunted population and perhaps one of the largest and most important goat populations in the South Coast, this information on seasonal movements and habitat use is crucial in our understanding of how to better manage this population. Lower Mainland
Roosevelt Elk Inventory - South Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct inventory of Roosevelt Elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) in the South Coast Region, through annual aerial flights. This project will generate population estimates for each unit surveyed and results will lead to improved conservation, management and planning. Lower Mainland
Thompson Region Bighorn Sheep Collaring Project Habitat Enhancement This project aims to collar 30-33 bighorn sheep rams from different herds in the Thompson region to better quantify connectivity of Thompson bighorn sheep herds, as well as clarify core home range use, summer and winter range migration timing and movement rates and ram foray patterns. The project will also develop a herd health baseline dataset from biological samples from individuals in each herd. Thompson - Nicola
Monitoring the Stein/Nahatlatch Grizzly Bear Population during Recovery. Habitat Enhancement This isolated and Critically Endangered grizzly bear population has been monitored using DNA sampling since 2005. To avoid an extended break in this continuity, we plan to continue the monitoring as the Province implements recovery actions every two years. The project is structured consistent with the spirit of Reconciliation and with the principals of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) “to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions”. Thompson - Nicola
South Rockies Grizzly Bear Inventory Habitat Enhancement We have been monitoring grizzly bear population trend in wildlife management units 4-01, 4-02, and 4-23 since 2006. Analysis has informed management decisions such as adjusting hunting quotas based on recent field-based population estimates, closing the hunting season in the South Rockies GBPU after a period of population decline, and planning access closures near huckleberry patches in 4-23. We now intend to focus on understanding and mitigating the causes of non-hunting mortality, especially when it is not reported nor recorded in the provincial mortality data and, monitor the recovery from the recent population decline. Kootenays
Boundary Restoration and Enhancement Program Habitat Enhancement This project will improve habitat quality, resiliency and forage availability for ungulates and other native species by restoring or enhancing degraded habitats in a range of ecosystems across the Boundary. This project will build community stewardship and technical capacity through the use of partnerships and local contractors. Kootenays
Kootenay Mule Deer Survival Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will assess factors limiting mule deer population growth in 4 study areas in the Kootenay Region by monitoring adult female survival, cause of death and fawn recruitment. Kootenays
Bull River Bighorn Sheep: Herd Health and Movement Dynamics Habitat Enhancement This proposal is to support the ongoing deployment of GPS collars as they continue to function and provide movement data and the potential for mortality investigations. There are 9/11 collars remaining on the Bull River herd, and 3/4 remaining on the Galton herd. The continued data fees and monitoring costs to maintain these 12 collars on bighorn sheep within these two herds is warranted given the 40% population decline in the Bull River herd, and the continued concern over contact with domestic sheep in both the Bull River and Galton herd ranges. Kootenays
Invasive plant management on bighorn sheep winter ranges Habitat Enhancement This proposed project involves a comprehensive and collaborative approach to managing invasive plants on 3 critical bighorn sheep winter ranges: Bull River, Wigwam Flats and Columbia Lake East. This proposed continuing project is attempting to increase the quality of grasslands by reducing invaders and increasing forage species. Kootenays
Diversifying MPB Clearcuts for Small Mustelids: Green-tree Retention, Debris Piles, and Enhanced Riparian habitats Habitat Enhancement Restoration of wildlife habitat with combined habitat components after clearcut harvesting of MPB-killed lodgepole pine stands. Three methods of habitat enhancement for small mustelids and their prey species to diversify clearcuts include (1) green-tree retention, (2) woody debris piles, and (3) enhanced riparian zones. Kootenays
Quantifying rates and mechanisms of grizzly bear mortality in the Elk Valley Habitat Enhancement Use radiotelemetry to identify the rates and causes of bear mortality (reported and unreported) in a population of bears facing one of the highest human-caused mortality rates in the province. Currently, the degree of under-reporting is unknown and suspected to be high, and these uncertainties compromise science-based management of grizzly bears locally and provincially. This project builds on a large body of research and previously collected data to provide recommendations for pressing management concerns and to engage the community in grizzly bear conservation. Kootenays
Maintenance of Furbearers and Prey Species on Large Clearcut Openings Using Linear Piles of Woody Debris Habitat Enhancement This proposal is designed to investigate the responses of small mustelids and their prey species to piles of woody debris arranged in a linear configuration across large (50+ ha) clearcut openings. Presence of these mammals in piles will indicate that these structures are effective as habitat in large clearcut openings. Kootenays
Elk movements and survival in the Elk Valley Habitat Enhancement Elk in the Elk Valley appear to have changed migration patterns in recent years. Productivity and survival of non-migratory and migratory elk in the Elk Valley may differ. This study examines elk movements and survival in the Elk Valley and will provide information to help make informed wildlife management decisions. Kootenays
Evaluating grizzly conservation management: quantifying recovery in the South Selkirks Habitat Enhancement This project is a unique opportunity to quantifiably evaluate 15 years of conservation activities recovering a threatened grizzly bear population in the South Selkirks using a DNA-based population survey. The results will allow BC’s first detailed, scientifically documented recovery process (from problem & solutions identification to solutions implementation, to realized conservation return) that will provide valuable input to the developing BC Grizzly Bear Management Plan. Our results will also inform conservation management of grizzly bear populations across BC by providing a blueprint for managing stressed grizzly bear populations. Kootenays
Premier Lake Park & adjacent Crown land Prescribed Burn Habitat Enhancement In partnership with the Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society (RMTS) and the Rocky Mountain Trench Ecosystem Restoration Program (RMTERP) and the BC Wildfire Service (BCWS), BC Parks will be conducting a 300 ha prescribed burn on 150 ha of park land as well as 150 ha of adjacent Crown land in the spring of 2019. This project aims to enhance habitat for wildlife in the Premier Lake Park area and on adjacent Crown land by restoring grassland and open forest habitats. Restoration of grasslands and open forests contributes to the region''s rich biodiversity by providing habitat for a wealth of wildlife species, many of which are at risk because habitat has been lost or degraded. Kootenays
Restoring Ungulate Habitat Through Clumpy Spacing Habitat Enhancement A clumpy-spacing trial was installed in 1990 to examine habitat enhancement for ungulates (deer winter range) through a unique spacing regime of overstocked stands of juvenile trees. This project will evaluate whether clumping spacing enhanced habitat use by ungulates and regionally-important wildlife. Cariboo
Ecology of small mammals in post-fire and salvage-logged landscapes Habitat Enhancement Fires and post-fire salvage-logging have unknown but likely significant impacts on small mammals, which are important prey species for forest carnivores. This project will quantify abundances and distribution of mice and voles, snowshoe hares, and red squirrels in response to these disturbances west of Williams Lake, where we are conducting concurrent work on marten. Cariboo
Assessing cougar density in The Cariboo Region through non-invasive survey techniques Habitat Enhancement A mark-recapture DNA science-based project utilizing closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to estimate cougar population densities in a study area of region 5. This project will incorporate a citizen science component for estimating cougar populations by including stakeholders. Cariboo
Assessing high-elevation forest harvesting strategies to maintain caribou and moose habitat Habitat Enhancement This is a two-year study designed to understand the use of high-elevation forestry blocks by moose, caribou, wolves and bears. We will assess differences in the distribution and abundance of moose and their predators across an adaptive management trial with conventional (>25ha) and small (<1.0ha) clearcuts as well as an unharvested control. This study will provide guidance to land managers attempting to limit apparent competition between moose and caribou, however, the results could be applied to efforts to enhance moose habitat across portions of the province where caribou and moose are not spatially adjacent. Cariboo
Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat Habitat Enhancement This is year 3 in the 2nd 5-yr cycle of a multi-partner project to restore endangered whitebark pine ecosystems with high value habitat value for bears in the southern Skeena Region. 2019-2020 plans include: (1) prepare a plan to optimally use the large whitebark pine seed collection made in 2018; (2) monitor 2014 and 2017 restoration plantings; (3) complete 5th research report on whitebark pine assisted migration trial (2012-2013 plantings); (4) continue outreach and extension activities including installation of an interpretive sign on Hudson Bay Mtn. Skeena
Determining Population Management Unit Boundaries for Mountain Goats in Skeena Region Habitat Enhancement We will monitor movements, home ranges, habitat selection and genetic relatedness of mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) on three adjacent mountain complexes northeast of Smithers, BC to determine biologically meaningful population management unit boundaries for these populations; results of this study can help to inform biologically based PMUs in the remainder of the Skeena Region. Skeena
Tahltan Burn Plan Habitat Enhancement We would like to develop a burn plan and schedule for identified critical habitat areas within the Tahltan Territory. Through community meetings and discussions with individuals within the local Tahltan communities we have identified areas that would benefit from habitat enhancement burning for moose, Stone’s sheep> and mountian goat populations within the Tahltan Territory. Precipitation monitoring has shown an increase in rain during the growing seasons and a reduction in snow packs over the last decade. This has lead to a changing land scape across the Tahltan territory. There has been encroachment of evergreen and deciduous trees into the alpine and open areas reducing ungulate food sources. There has also been an increase in willow and alder growth in many areas. We are looking to incorporate a more pro-active approach to enhancing wildlife populations within our territory. The Tahltan Central Government has invested significant amounts of it’s own resources into our wildlife and lands programs but we do not have the capacity at the moment to deliver a burn program without assistance from outside sources. Through this project we would like to build the capacity to develop projects internally. Skeena
CHRF Whitesail Reach Habitat Enhancement This restoration project is designed to benefit the Tweedsmuir-Entiako caribou herd by clearing debris from the shore line of calving islands on Whitesail Lake. Skeena
CHRF Tweedsmuir – Entiako Caribou Lichen Restoration Habitat Enhancement This restoration project is designed to benefit the Tweedsmuir-Entiako herd by seeding lichen fragments over 50 ha in areas impacted by Chelaslie wildfire. Skeena
Enhancing caribou survival within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds Habitat Enhancement This will be Year 6 of the maternal penning project that is used as one of several complementary emergency measures implemented to avert extirpation, and eventually recover, the population of caribou known as the Klinse-Za/Scott herds located in the south Peace region of northern British Columbia. Omineca/Peace
Tuchodi Prescribed Burns for Wildlife Habitat Habitat Enhancement The Tuchodi Prescribed Burn Program seeks to support critical winter range for multiple ungulate species in northern British Columbia by improving the quantity and nutritional quality of forage in winter range habitats. By restoring early-seral habitats and rejuvenating mid-seral habitats, the program will ensure the long-term sustainability of ungulate populations, maintain hunting and recreational opportunities, and support traditional use of wildlife by First Nations. Omineca/Peace
Wolf predation risk to moose in north-central BC Habitat Enhancement This project investigates seasonal wolf predation risk to moose in two of the provincial moose research project study sites. We track kill sites of up to 10 wolf packs in each site by deploying satellite collars and checking location clusters for evidence and type of prey killed, while also determining space use parameters and resource selection. Omineca/Peace
Chase Caribou Herd Response to Extensive Habitat Alterations Habitat Enhancement This project will assess the potential impacts of recent large-scale habitat alterations caused by damaged forests (wildfire and mountain pine beetle) on the population stability of the Chase caribou herd. We will contrast current population parameters (i.e., seasonal range use, habitat use/selection, mortality causes, and calf recruitment) to population parameters of the herd prior to recent disturbance. Omineca/Peace
KlinseZa/Scott East Caribou Maternal Pen Health Evaluation Habitat Enhancement Emergency recovery measures have led to improved outcomes for the demographics of the threatened Klinse-Za herd in north-central BC, but the effects of this intensive and invasive management on individual and herd health have just begun to be investigated. In year 1 of this project, we formed collaborations with wildlife health experts, and are submitting health samples for laboratory analyses addressing various metrics of stress, nutrition, pathogens, and body condition; a summary database and report are planned for end of the fiscal year. In this 2nd year, we propose to submit 2019 penning samples for labwork, analyze the laboratory results, and interpret the findings; in the third year, to submit a peer-reviewed publication. Omineca/Peace
Sharp-tailed Grouse Population and Lek Habitat Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will re-initiate the monitoring of sharp-tailed grouse populations in the North Peace and produce a complete reproductive season habitat model. Results of this project will determine population status, increase knowledge of the sub-species, contribute to management of the species and provide guidance to industrial proponents. Omineca/Peace
Linking forest condition, heat stress, and moose health Habitat Enhancement Moose cope poorly with heat and must seek thermal shelter during periods of heat stress. However, recourse to thermal shelter logically requires that it be in sufficient supply. The purpose of this study is to investigate the thermal environment in a region where Mountain Pine Beetle salvage logging has radically shifted the landscape to an early-seral condition. Operative temperature will be measured in common forest types to determine the a) gravity of thermal stress in this landscape and b) extent to which it is under management control. Omineca/Peace
Implications of bear demography on recovery of the Klinse-Za caribou herd Habitat Enhancement This seed project will result in a collaboratively developed, multi-year funding proposal to address information gaps in black and grizzly bear demography, distribution, and diets; particularly in relation to the implementation of caribou recovery measures in the Klinse-Za caribou herd. Omineca/Peace
Evaluating elk population trend, habitat use, and potential for competition with moose in the southern central Omineca Habitat Enhancement Female elk will be collared in the southern Omineca around Prince George and monitored to determine survival rate, calf recruitment and population trends as baseline information. Resource selection will determine habitat use to inform elk management regionally where extensive mountain pine beetle salvage has occurred. Collared elk will allow regional staff to develop a refined sightability correction factor to facilitate accurate abundance estimates. Omineca/Peace
Canada Lynx habitat ecology on an intensively harvested landscape. Habitat Enhancement Using a combination of GPS collars and non-invasive survey techniques we will investigate the habitat ecology and population status of Canada lynx in an intensively harvested landscape in central BC. The aim of this study is to provide applied recommendations for habitat and species management as well as improve monitoring methods for Canada lynx in a rapidly changing landscape. Omineca/Peace
Northern Myotis Maternal Roost Study Habitat Enhancement Locate and describe biophysical attributes of maternal colonies of the federally endangered northern myotis (often multiple trees within a geographic area) through capture and radio telemetry to inform 1) understanding and identification of critical habitat as recommended in the species recovery strategy (Environment Canada 2015), 2) contribute to the develop of a habitat management tool for industry 3) provide information to contribute to WHA designation should the re-assessment of Identified Wildlife include northern myotis, 4) contribute to mitigation for habitat loss such as creation of wildlife habitat trees with collaborators. Omineca/Peace
Little Bobtail Wildfire Ecosystem Restoration Plan – Riparian Planting Habitat Enhancement The Society for Ecosystem Restoration in Northern BC (SERNbc) has identified an opportunity to improve riparian ecosystem functioning impacted by the Little Bobtail wildfire in 2015. As part of a broader Ecosystem Restoration Plan (ERP) already completed, this project seeks to plant 37,000 trees across 48 hectares of burned riparian areas critical to local fish and wildlife populations. Omineca/Peace
CHRF Kotcho Lake Restoration Area Habitat Enhancement This project is designed to benefit the SnakeSahtahneh caribou herd by limiting predator use of legacy seismic lines and using re-vegetation to increase habitat suitability for caribou. Omineca/Peace
Mule deer response to wildfire and habitat change in southern British Columbia Habitat Enhancement Identify the effect of wildfire on mule deer habitat selection and population growth in the Boundary Region, West Okanagan, and Bonaparte Plateau areas of British Columbia, and provide management tools and recommendations to increase mule deer abundance. Okanagan