Projects

Projects funded by FESBC help minimize wildfire risk to better protect communities, enhance wildlife habitat, improve low-value forests, re-plant damaged forests, and utilize fibre that would otherwise be burned. Many of these projects contain carbon benefits which help to mitigate climate change.

Quick Facts - FESBC by the Numbers

269

Projects approved across B.C.

32%

Projects funded led by or have First Nations participation.

$357 Million

Economic activity generated by 269 projects.

2,214

Full time equivalent jobs created.

5.1 Million

Cubic meters of forest fibre utilized that would otherwise have been burned.

5.3 Million

Tonnes of CO2e sequestered or avoided = 1.1 million cars off the road for a year.

$237.6 Million

In grants approved.

Projects List


Project Title Project Proponent Society Purpose Full Proposal Description Closest Community
Multi-regional Projects
Provincial Forest Carbon Reforestation Project Office of the Chief Forester-FLNRORD Forest Carbon The focus is to reforest areas of BC Crown Land that would otherwise not regenerate naturally to healthy growing forests that sequester carbon from the atmosphere. Some of the areas were heavily degraded from wildfires over the last 10 years. Some higher elevation areas are targeted for reforestation with provincially rare and endangered species, the goal being to increase the resiliency of BC Forests. Various
Thinning, Fertilization, and Carbon Sequestration Applied Mammal Research Institute Forest Carbon As regenerating forests grow, they sequester carbon from the atmosphere during photosynthesis and store it in biomass above (stem, branches, and leaves) and below (roots) ground. From a forest ecosystem perspective, positive biomass responses of understory vegetation are associated with thinned and fertilized stands. This project is designed to measure tree and stand growth, yield, biomass, and carbon sequestration 25 years after thinning and repeated fertilization. Four milestones for the first year of the project include: (1) sampling of understory vegetation and coniferous stand structure, (2) sampling of tree and stand growth, yield, and crown dimensions, (3) data management and analysis, and (4) a final report outlining the influence of stand thinning and fertilization on carbon sequestration in managed forests. Various
Work Plan for Provincial Foliar Sampling Database Weyerhaeuser Company Limited Forest Carbon Development of a work plan to guide the creation of a central, provincial level database for warehousing foliar sampling data. Intention is to enable users to sort, extract, analyze and extrapolate information and create efficiencies. Various
Forest Carbon Fertilization Project FLNRORD-Forest Carbon Initiative Forest Carbon This is a provincial scope project to identify priority forest stands to be fertilized to increase overall stand growth. The activities include strategic assessment, site level planning and prescriptions, fertilizer purchase and application. The priority areas are on the Coast in forests with high site index and known excellent return on investment for fertilization activities. The forest grows faster as a result of the fertilization, providing larger stem size more quickly. This promotes increased carbon sequestration and ultimately medium to longer term payback in timber quality. Forest stands being fertilized within this project are reserved from timber harvest for at least 10 years to maximize the sequestration of carbon from the atmosphere. Various
Planning for Reforestation and Rehabilitation University of British Columbia Forest Carbon Updates to provincial climate-based reforestation models and new research analysis to propose protection areas for vulnerable tree species in future climates. Various
Innovative Forest Harvesting and Renewal Treatments Skyline Forestry Consultants Ltd Forest Carbon A study to develop forest harvesting and regeneration options that promote growth, biodiversity, carbon storage, and ecological resilience. Additionally, a documentary film and a TED talk discussing the study and the state of First Nations collaboration in forestry. Various
Elevating Carbon Stewardship at the Block Level Westland Resources Limited Forest Carbon Research to identify small scale forest treatments that reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The objective of this research project was to support the Forest Carbon Initiative through insights and analysis concerning certain forest practices. The final report identified the amount of CO2e potentially in forest residual cull piles when they burn. Findings can be used in future modelling to achieve carbon stewardship. Various
Improved Volume and Carbon Decision Support University of British Columbia Forest Carbon Collecting fertilized-tree growth data in the FLNRORD North and South areas to help inform forest management decisions regarding improved volume and carbon sequestration. Various
Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation - Habitat Improvement Projects FESBC Habitat Enhancement Co-funded projects between HCTF and FESBC that are primarily focused on improving forested wildlife habitat. Projects are submitted via the HCTF portal and reviewed by HCTF and FESBC staff for co-funding opportunities. The result is improved wildlife habitat and healthier wildlife populations. Various
Supporting Range-wide Whitebark Pine Regeneration Yellow Point Propagation Stand Rehabilitation Whitebark pine is listed as an Endangered Species under the Federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) due to the impacts of white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, fire suppression, and global climate change. The tree species is considered to have high biodiversity values and is suitable for planting on marginal high elevation sites where wildfire has reduced forest cover. Whitebark pine is also ecologically important and a key forage source for Grizzly Bears but there's currently insufficient seed stock to support broad-scale management and recovery efforts. This project helped to implement and launch a large-scale seed collection effort to support future recovery work. Activities included cone surveys, cone protection, seed collection, and seedling planting. Various
Wildfire Risk Analysis Federation of BC Woodlot Associations Wildfire Risk Reduction This project was to analyze provincial wildfire threat mapping to render threat class by woodlot, both inside and adjacent to the community wildland-urban interface boundaries. The overview threat mapping for the Cariboo Region is to be utilized to localize the information so it can be applied to specific woodlots. Various
Burning Questions: Reducing Wildfire Risks Evelyn Hamilton Wildfire Risk Reduction This was a research project on the response of selected ecosystems to fire. The goal of the study was to provide information to assist with fire hazard reduction decision making. Various
First Nations Wildfire Risk Reduction Planning Guidance First Nations' Emergency Services of BC Wildfire Risk Reduction This was a pilot project developed in the Kootenay region to demonstrate how First Nation communities could be part of the planning process aimed at identifying treatment priorities in traditional territories with the goal of increasing access to funding options from various funding sources. Various
FESBC and UBCM Wildfire Risk Reduction Co-funding Program Union of BC Municipalities Wildfire Risk Reduction FESBC partnered with the Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM) to provide funding to local governments and First Nations who receive funding for wildfire risk reduction projects on Crown land under the Strategic Wildfire Prevention Initiative and the FireSmart Community Resiliency Investment Community Supports Program. Various
Project Title Project Proponent Society Purpose Full Proposal Description Closest Community
Cariboo Region
Cariboo Wildfire Forest Carbon Reforestation Office Of the Chief Forester-FLNRORD Forest Carbon This project is to reforest areas severely impacted by the unprecedented scope and scale of the 2017 and 2018 devastating wildfires and by doing so, obtain maximum benefit of carbon sequestration. Activites include planning, mapping, surveying, and planting trees towards the goal of rehabilitating fire-damaged areas. Reforesting areas where there are no commercial obligations to reforest enhances and restores productivity in in these areas. This project helps to support the achievement of Provincial greenhouse gas reduction goals and the reforestation component of the Cariboo and Thompson-Okanagan Restoration Plan. Various
Fibre Utilization and Recovery in the Chilcotin Tsi Del Del Enterprises Ltd. Forest Carbon Transporting uneconomic wood to be chipped at a pulp wood, pellet or energy facility to avoid pile burning emissions. Tsi Del Del Enterprise Ltd.'s goal in this project is to maximize fibre utilization and recovery in all future harvesting operations by extracting both sawlog and pulp fibre supplies. Through adjustments to harvest operations during the bunching and processing phase in a way that will allow for greater utilization of fibre. This results in the recovery of fibre normally left on site to be burned. This approach creates long-term carbon benefits. Alexis Creek
Alkali Logging Debris Chipping and Hauling - Part 1 Alkali Resource Management Ltd. Forest Carbon This project involved chipping logging debris for markets in Williams Lake. The majority of the residual volume comes from community forest harvesting operations and wildfire risk reduction treatments adjacent to communities and along primary access roads. The chipped material will be sold at market to local manufacturingeither as hog for energy or biomass for pellets. Alkali Lake
West Chilcotin - Expedited Fibre Recovery Cost West Chilcotin Forest Products Ltd. Forest Carbon The fibre recovery program is enabling West Chilcotin Forest Products, a company owned by the Ulkatcho First Nation, to increase utilization of non-merchantable and undersize logs by providing economic support for the cost of harvesting and hauling of the pulp wood to Bella Coola to then ship to the Harmac Pacific pulp mill in Nanaimo. On the ground, the fibre recovery program is increasing utilization of forest fibre by approximately 20% based on current harvest plans with the added benefit of addressing the use of waste wood which has concerned local citizens in the past. As a result, cull piles are now smaller, and less material is burned as waste in cut blocks. Usually, non-merchantable fibre is left in piles along forest roads and is legally required to be burned. By utilizing the fibre instead carbon benefits are created which contribute to the mitigation of climate change. Anahim Lake
West Chilcotin Forest Products Fibre Recovery Cost Differential - 2019-20 West Chilcotin Forest Products Ltd. Forest Carbon This project will be getting underway some time in 2021 and is for utilization of uneconomic wood to avoid pile burning emissions and to boost local economies and coastal pulp mill facilities. This is a continuation of the same work as full proposal number FC0000579, which was very successful. Anahim Lake
2017 FCI Initiatives - Surveys & Utilization FLNRORD - Forest Carbon Initiative Forest Carbon This project sets the stage for the Forest Carbon Initiative reforestation. It implements a number of activities that generate postivie GHG reduction objectives. The T'exelcemc (Williams Lake Band) and the District expressed a desire to utilize the residual piles associated with burnt timber harvesting that had alrady been completed near Williams Lake. As a result of this interest a grinding project with the T'exelcemc (Williams Lake Band) was approved and ultimately other partners such as Tŝideldel, Atlantic Power and Pinnacle Pellet. This project will also identify fibre utilization opportunities near Williams Lake as a result of Ministry Wildfire Risk Reduction projects and in subsequent years will be reforesting areas heavily degraded through wildfire. The last part of this project is to undertake a cultural assessment and hand fertilization project for trees and FN values in areas East of Williams Lake. Various
Grinding and Transporting of Residual Fibre Barkerville Historic Town & Park governed by The Barkerville Heritage Trust Forest Carbon This project supports the grinding and hauling of the residual fibre resulting from the wildfire risk reduction activities as part of another FESBC-supported project. The fibre is transported to Cariboo Pulp and Paper for use as hog fuel instead of being burned on site. This project supports the Province’s greenhouse gas reduction targets by avoiding carbon emissions through burning. Barkerville
Fibre Utilization in the Cariboo Region Central Chilcotin Rehabilitation Ltd. Forest Carbon This project involved transporting uneconomic residual wood to pulp mills, a pellet plant and a power plant to avoid pile burning emissions and improve fibre utilization.The residual fibres are typically burned due to the poor quality, small piece size and distance from markets. The volume of residual fibre is generated through a combination of commercial harvesting operations for sawlogs and also from landscape level wildfire risk reduction treatments. Some areas of very old mountain pine beetle killed forests are traditionally rehabilitated using commercial harvesting and in these areas large volumes of residual un-economic fibre are created. The recovery of this fibre creates employment stability for First Nations and local logging contractors. Williams Lake
Fibre Utilization and Recovery- 100 Mile House BC Cariboo Pulp & Paper Forest Carbon This project involves the recovery and utilization of pulp logs from the 100 Mile House area that would otherwise be uneconomical to transport. The pulp logs are transported to Cariboo Pulp and Paper in Quesnel, BC, to be chipped and used for other products. Through the utilization of the pulp logs, the residual fibre generated from harvest activities is reduced by up to 50%, which lessens greenhouse gas emissions that would otherwise be generated through the burning of the residual fibre. Fibre utilization funding helps to provide fibre needed by secondary fibre users which maintains jobs and supports communities. 100 Mile House
Fibre Utilization and Recovery- Quesnel Cariboo Pulp & Paper Forest Carbon This project increases the utilization of pulp and biologs from the Quesnel and Williams Lake areas that would otherwise be uneconomical. The pulp logs are transported to Cariboo Pulp and Paper in Quesnel, BC to be chipped and used for pulp, and the recovered biologs are used for hog fuel to create energy. The fibre is recovered from roadside residual waste resulting from primary harvest activities as well as through the rehabilitation of low-value stands. Through the utilization of the fibre, pile burning is avoided which results in reduced greenhouse gas emissions, fire impacted areas are reforested, and employment is generated. Quesnel
Recovery and Utilization of Residual Fibre near Nazko, BC RPP Holdings Inc. Forest Carbon The project is focused on waste fibre utilization in the Nazko area, where the long-haul distances to move pulp logs isn't normally economically feasible. The initial phase of the project enabled the recovery of pulp fibre, which was then delivered to Cariboo Pulp & Paper in Quesnel. Future activities under this project may include the rehabilitation of low-grade uneconomical stands impacted by mountain pine beetle. Through this project, fire hazard is reduced and significant employment opportunities are created in an area adversely impacted by a downturn in the forest sector and a reduction in timber supply. By utilizing the pulp logs, which would otherwise be burned, greenhouse gas emissions that would otherwise be generated through pile burning post-harvest, are avoided. Quesnel
Hog Fuel Recovery in the Williams Lake Market Area Williams Lake First Nation Forest Carbon The 2017 wildfires resulted in the need for intensive salvage harvesting in areas around the City of Williams Lake and Williams Lake First Nation (WLFN) communities. The salvage created significant volumes of residual fibre which would normally be left on site and burned. WLFN expressed an interest in recovering this fibre but the transportation of the fibre on it's own was uneconomical. FESBC funding assisted in transporting the fibre for recovery, resulting in reduced greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding burning and improved fibre utilization. Ongoing operations will support the recovery of residual fibre resulting from wildfire risk reduction projects and will generate fibre for both Atlantic Power and Pinnacle Renewable Energy operations in Williams Lake. Williams Lake
Williams Lake Power Plant 2019 Atlantic Power (Williams Lake) Ltd Forest Carbon This projectenhances recovery and utilization of fibre by supporting the transportation of uneconomic fibre to Atlantic Power to be used to generate electricity. Recovery also contributes to greenhouse gas emission reduction by avoiding pile burning and reducing the need for other means of electricity generation. The Power plant was originally built to assist the forest industry in replacing beehive burners. Over the years, the vast majority of the power plant fibre needs were met by local sawmills. More recently, the fibre demand has to be met by utilization of fibre from the forests directly, resulting in a demand for "bush run" wood fibre. This project assists Atlantic Power in running their facility and providing power to upwards of 50,000 homes in British Columbia during a 12 month operating period. The fibre utilized by Atlantic Power is uneconomic and generally otherwise is burnt in residual waste wood pile burning. This project maintains local employment, power generation and many other ancillery benefits for the City of Williams Lake and it's residents along the San Jose valley. Williams Lake
Alkali Logging Debris Chipping and Hauling - Part 2 Alkali Resource Management Ltd. Forest Carbon This project involved transporting uneconomic residual wood to pulp mills, a pellet plant and a power plant to avoid pile burning emissions and to improve the utilization of fibre. The residual fibre is typically burned and wasted due to the poor quality, small piece size and distance from markets, so being able to utilize it rather than burn it results in multiple benefits. The residual fibre that otherwise would have been slash burned is generated through a number of forest harvesting activities undertaken by the First Nation including wildfire risk reduction, community forest timber harvesting and habitat improvement projects. Alkali Lake
Feasibility of a Centralized Sortyard System FPInnovations Fibre Recovery This project was a research project to assess the establishment of a centralized log sorting yard in the Quesnel District. By reducing log transportation time, the centralized yard could increase access to timber and improve the District's ability to rehabilitate low value/uneconomic mountain pine beetle-killed stands. FPI used their experience and modeling to evaluate road systems and potential sort yard locations to make theoretical recommendations. Various sortyard locations were modelled including Nazko and Quesnel. Quesnel
Grinding and Transporting of Residual Fibre to Support Pellet and Pulp Manufacturers Pacific Bioenergy Fibre Recovery This project facilitates the utilization of uneconomic and non-merchantable low-grade fibre from blocks harvested in the Quesnel Timber Supply area that would otherwise be burned on site. Fibre suitable for pulp is chipped in Quesnel and utilized by local pulp mills. Fibre not suitable for pulp is processed and shipped to the Pacific BioEnergy Pellet plant in Prince George. This project helps to support the Province’s greenhouse gas reduction targets, create and maintain employment, and maximize fibre utilization. Quesnel
Cariboo Pulp and Paper- Intake 7 Cariboo Pulp & Paper Fibre Recovery This project will help move low value pulp fibre from areas beyond the current economic reach in the Quesnel timber supply area to Cariboo Pulp in Quesnel. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Nazko
Williams Lake Power Plant 2020 Atlantic Power (Williams Lake) Ltd. Fibre Recovery This project will assist local First Nations companies to deliver fibre to Atlantic Power in Williams Lake where it will be used to generate electricity. The project will utilize two mobile grinders and return to harvest cut blocks that have remaining waste and logging debris piles. The piles will be loaded into the grinder by a loader which grinds the debris and loads it into a chip truck which will deliver the product to Atlantic Power in Williams Lake to be burned to generate power. Grinding of residual forest debris from logging operations generally located in the Chilcotin area will utilize the waste fibre that would otherwise be burnt. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Williams Lake
Road Rehabilitation in the Chilcotin Terraforma Environmental Ltd Habitat Enhancement Working with First Nations, licensees and stakeholders this project will identify which roads should be rehabilitated. The next phase will be to rehabilitate those roads using techniques supporting First Nations traditional use plants. First Nations communities will participate in the work in a meaningful way from planning and seed collection to cultivating and seeding the roads. The roads will be seeded primarily to lodgepole pine which is adapted to highly disturbed soils but also with a number of native plant species which will enhance habitat for moose and other species. The result will be fully treed roads which no longer carry elevated risk of erosion or slope failure and will add to the merchantable volume of forests in the area. The trees and plants will also provide carbon sequestration benefits. The old roads will no longer serve as corridors for predators or hunters and will have attributes that will enhance habitat by providing browsing opportunities in between major browse zones. Alexis Creek
Esk'etemc Mule Deer Habitat Restoration Alkali Resource Management Ltd. Habitat Enhancement Surveys, planning, and prescriptions for mule deer winter range habitat improvement in the Esk'etemc community forest and First Nation Woodland License. Alkali lake
Mule Deer Winter Range Restoration Alkali Resource Management Ltd. Habitat Enhancement Surveying, mapping, and prescriptions for 500 hectares of mule deer winter range restoration. Alkali lake
Douglas-fir Density Spacing - Flatrock Williams Lake Community Forest LP Stand Rehabilitation Through this funding, over 60 hectares of treatment areas were identified and tree thinning work was completed, lowering the fuel loading and fire hazard rating for these areas. Much of the project site was occupied by moderate to high density stands--high risks for wildfires. The area is often impacted by snow, ice damage, and Spruce budworm and the stand itself has been suppressed with trees of small diameter which has led to an environment limiting forage opportunities for wildlife. The Williams Lake Community Forest (WLCF) is situated in two separate geographic areas around the City of Williams Lake covering a total of 288 square kilometres. As a 50/50 partnership between the Williams Lake First Nation and the City of Williams Lake, the community forest is a vital resource having contributed both financial support as well as employment opportunities into the communities since 2014. Williams Lake
CCR Douglas-fir Fire Rehabilitation Central Chilcotin Rehabilitation Ltd. Stand Rehabilitation Planning, harvesting and planting in high burn intensity interior Douglas-fir stands hit during the 2017 wildfires. Planning includes small areas of bark beetle management using anti-aggregation pheromones, and a feasibility study for biomass transport to bioenergy facilities. The project also involves overstory removal of danger trees, site preparation, sowing of seedlings and planting. The local First Nation communities will be planting several million seedlings over the next few years. Alexis Creek
Pre-commercial Thinning of Drybelt Fir UBC Stand Rehabilitation This project involved the thinning of trees to increase tree growing space and volume and to improve overall stand health. Williams Lake
Hanceville Fire Rehabilitation Elhdaqox Developments Ltd. Stand Rehabilitation This project involved site preparation treatments for reforestation in areas of the 2017 Hanceville Fire with low volume recovery and areas affected by mountain pine beetle. The site preparation used a winged tooth subsoiler pulled behind a dozer. These areas are contributing to the provincial Forest Carbon Intiative. Hanceville
Stand Rehabilitation and Utilization of Residual Fibre - Pt. 2 NAZBEC Limited Partnership Stand Rehabilitation This is a continuation of another FESBC-supported rehabilitation project in the Quesnel Forest District. Through this project, biomass will be utilized from mountain pine beetle-damaged stands and residual waste fibre piles west of Quesnel, and transported to Prince George where it will be manufactured into pellets for use as energy. These activities will result in reduction of greenhouse gases by avoiding the release of carbon through on site burning, enhance fibre utilization, and help maintain and create employment. The beetle impacted stands that are rehabilitated will be harvested and increase the long-term timber supply for future generations. Quesnel
Stand Rehabilitation of Wildfire Impacted Stands Near Nazko, BC Cariboo Pulp & Paper Stand Rehabilitation The 2017 Plateau Fire burned a large area west of Quesnel, leaving behind a large volume of salvageable, but uneconomical, burned timber. This project involves the planning and harvesting of this and surrounding mountain pine beetle-killed lodgepole pine with the goal of regenerating damaged stands. Activities include assessments, prescriptions and treatment of fire-killed or bark beetle-damaged stands, focusing on areas that have not naturally regenerated. The fibre recovered will be utilized for pulp or energy, and the reforested area will contribute to the long-term fibre supply in the Quesnel Timber Supply Area. Nazko
Evaluating the Effectiveness of Overstory Removal FPInnovations Stand Rehabilitation This was a pilot project to demonstrate innovative strategies for rehabilitating mountain pine beetle-killed (MPB-killed) stands. Overstory removal treatments were compared to evaluate their costs and effectiveness in preparing MPB-killed sites for regeneration. Various
Stand Rehabilitation and Utilization of Residual Fibre to Avoid Pile Burning - Pt. 1 NAZBEC Limited Partnership Stand Rehabilitation Through this project biomass will be utilized from mountain pine beetle-damaged stands and residual waste fibre piles west of Quesnel, and transported to Prince George, where it will be manufactured into pellets for use as energy. These activities will result in reduction of greenhouse gases by avoiding the release of carbon through on site burning, enhance fibre utilization, and help maintain and create employment. The rehabilitated beetle-impacted stands will be harvested and reforested,thereby increasing the long-term timber supply for future generations. Quesnel
ACFN/Tl’etinqox MPB Rehabilitation and Wildfire Risk Reduction Central Chilcotin Rehabilitation Ltd. Stand Rehabilitation This project involved planning and harvesting of severely degraded, dead, or uneconomical stands and treatments for a landscape level fuel break to reduce wildfire risk. The focus of operations was on mountain pine beetle-killed stands with limited regeneration, on rehabilitation, and on reforestation. Large areas of wildfire breaks were constructed through mechanized treatments and manual cutting which created employment for First Nations peoples and protected local communities from wildfire risks. While this project is complete, work continued under a new wildfire risk reduction proposal, WR0000121. Puntzi Lake
Strouse Lake Knockdown and Grinding Elhdaqox Developments Ltd. Stand Rehabilitation This project is to utilize the residual waste fibre resulting from a stand rehabilitation project funded by Forests for Tomorrow (FFT). There are three phases that are dovetailed: FFT is funding the initial clearing of the damaged forest, then FESBC is funding the utilization of the resulting residual fibre that would otherwise have traditionally been burnt, and finally FFT is funding the reforestation of the site for future generations. The utilized fibre will be delivered to Pinnacle or Atlantic Power in Williams Lake to make green energy. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Williams Lake
Esk'etemc Wildfire Risk Management Alkali Resource Management Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project produced a landscape level plan for wildfire risk mitigation activities. With spatial data from the BC Wildfire Service 2017 Provincial Strategic Threat Analysis, local collaboration and input from the staff at FLNRORD Forest Stewardship, wildfire perspective from BCWS, input from the city of Williams Lake and the Cariboo Regional District, plus a few more partners, the Esk’etemc were able to create a plan that addressed areas that are high risk as well as identified where there were opportunities to take on fuel treatment projects or to make suggestions on which direction to take wildland fire mitigation plans. Alkali Lake
Ground Truth of Alkali Lake Fuel Treatment Areas Alkali Resource Management Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project collected field data to support preparation of a landscape level plan for wildfire risk mitigation activities. With spatial data from the BC Wildfire Service 2017 Provincial Strategic Threat Analysis, local collaboration and input from the staff at FLNRORD Forest Stewardship, wildfire perspective from BCWS, input from the city of Williams Lake and the Cariboo Regional District, plus a few more partners, the Esk’etemc were able to create a plan that addressed areas that are high risk as well as identified where there were opportunities to take on fuel treatment projects or to make suggestions on which direction to take wildland fire mitigation plans. Alkali Lake
CCR - Fire Hazard Reduction/Rehabilitation Central Chilcotin Rehabilitation Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project's primary purpose was wildfire risk reduction adjacent to the communities of Redstone and Puntzi. The landscape level fuel break had a combination of stand rehabilitation treatments as well as primary fuel breaks created by cutting away dead lodgepole pine. Where possible, this uneconomic fuel was added to the CCR incremental haul program. Approximately 2000 ha per year will be cleared to make the landscape level fuel break where fire fighters can make defensive barriers next to the wildfires in this area. Alexis Creek
Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments to Protect Community of ?Esdilagh Esdilagh Development Corporation Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction The goal of this project is to reduce wildfire risk on portion of a large landscape-level primary fuel break south of Quesnel in the traditional territory of ?Esdilagh (also known as the Alexandria Band). The traditional territory of ?Esdilagh First Nation is situated along both sides of the Fraser River between Williams Lake and Quesnel BC and the community has a population of 204. Post harvest mechanical and manual fuel treatments will create a fuel break that can significantly alter fire behaviour and intensity and reduce the risk of a wildfire spreading to other resource values. Residual waste fibre resulting from the treatments will be removed and sold to pellet producers and other industrial users of biomass. Alexandria
Landscape Level Fuel Treatment Williams Lake Community Forest LP Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is within the Williams Lake Community Forest and aims to create a landscape level fuel break to assist in protecting the City of Williams Lake. The break will be placed all along the hydro powerlines and essentially widens the break area on either side of the powerline by reducing the amount of flamable fuel in those areas. Logging debris and small diameter wood will be sent to s Williams Lake bio-energy facility. Williams Lake
South Canim Fire Management Planning Canim Lake Indian Band Wildfire Risk Reduction This project enabled the Canim Lake Indian Band to develop a Fire Management Plan to provide strategic direction for future treatments to reduce the risk of wildfire. The project focused on creating a landscape-level plan for wildfire fuel breaks to reduce risk and protect lives and properties from wildfire on Crown land surrounding the community of Canim Lake Band on the southwest end of Canim Lake. Canim Lake
Eniyud Community Forest Tatla Lake Wildfire Fuel Treatment Plan Eniyud Community Forest Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project was for prescriptions for the Eniyud Community Forest and for wildfire fuel reduction as identified in the Tatla Lake Landscape Fire Management Plan. Tatla Lake
Meadow Lake / Lac La Hache Wildfire Mitigation / Rehabilitation Zanzibar Holdings Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction Zanzibar Holdings Ltd. and the community of Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (St-wet-lem hight-lem) (SXFN) have partnered to reduce wildfire risk in forested areas near Big Bar Lake, which is located approximately 40 kilometres west of Clinton, BC. The goal of the fuel breaks is to help reduce the intensity and rate of spread of an approaching wildfire and to provide a point of attack for fire suppression activities in the event of a wildfire. The joint project with SXFN (formerly Dog Creek Indian Band & Canoe Creek Indian Band) has provided employment for local crews for two years. Big Bar Lake
Quesnel Community Wildfire Protection Plan - Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments - Phase 1 C&C Wood Products Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project includes planning, prescription and treatment work aligned with priorities identified in the City of Quesnel Community Wildfire Protection Plan. These priorities were established jointly with BC Wildfire Service fuel management specialists and Quesnel Resource District staff.  Activities include planning and prescription development, harvesting, understory pruning and thinning, and forest floor fuel piling and burning. Quesnel
Borland Valley Fuel Management Treatment FLNRORD Cariboo Region Wildfire Risk Reduction This was a demonstration project for fuel management treatment and mule deer winter range habitat enhancement. The project included biomass removal and recovery of merchantable timber through machine and hand work. The treatments provided demonstration sites and examples for future treatments while providing wildfire hazard mitigation by reducing fuel loading through the removal of ladder and fine fuels. Walking trails for residents were maintained. These measures will also improve habitat features for mule deer. Where possible, timber was sold and residual fibre was recovered for sale in the local biomass market. 150 Mile House
Barkerville Historic Town Wildfire Fuel Treatment - Phase 1 Barkerville Historic Town & Park governed by The Barkerville Heritage Trust Wildfire Risk Reduction Phase 1 of the Barkerville wildfire risk reduction project included selective harvesting followed by machine and hand thinning on approximately 52 hectares immediately east of the Barkerville historic townsite. The project also facilitated the utilization of fibre resulting from the wildfire risk reduction activities. FESBC funding helps to support the grinding and hauling of the residual waste fibre to Cariboo Pulp and Paper for use as hog fuel. Otherwise the fibre piles would need to be burned, which would have resulted in greenhouse gas emissions. Barkerville
Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments Within 100 Mile Community Forest - Phase 1 100 Mile Development Corporation Wildfire Risk Reduction The Forest Enhancement Society of BC (FESBC) is supporting three projects within the 100 Mile House Community Forest which will reduce wildfire risk in priority interface areas. This first phase assessed and identified wildfire risk and fuel break units within 1,125 hectares in areas surrounding the communities of 100 Mile House, Horse Lake, and Lone Butte. The objective has been to create a shaded fuel break which will result in a more fire resilient stand that also conserves mule deer winter range habitat and retains old growth forest characteristics. 100 Mile House
Woodlot 577 Fire Mitigation Action Plan near 100 Mile House District of 100 Mile House Wildfire Risk Reduction Wildfire fuel break construction in 100 Mile community woodlot. This project is focused on areas near and adjacent to the 99 Mile ski trails and railroad. Activities included community planning, field layout, and prescriptions for wildfire treatments. 100 Mile House
Clinton Landscape Level Fire Mitigation Clinton and District Community Forest of BC Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project will help to reduce the wildfire hazard on identified high priority areas within the Clinton Community Forest, adjacent to Clinton and surrounding rural developments. Project activities include planning, mapping, prescription development and initial treatments. Wildfire risk will be reduced through standard fuel management practices such as thinning, pruning, removal of unhealthy trees, understory burning, and encouragement of deciduous tree growth.The approach will also utilize an existing fireguard from the Elephant Hill wildfire as a control point wherever possible. Clinton
Wildfire Risk Reduction on Cariboo Woodlot Licence Cariboo Woodlot Association Wildfire Risk Reduction This project involved the Implementation of forest fuel management/wildfire risk reduction prescriptions developed under an earlier project and was coordinated by the Cariboo Woodlot Association. It involved 321.2 ha of prescribed wildfire risk reduction activities over 16 woodlots (Crown land portion only). The majority of treatments are in the wildland urban interface, with an investment made to complete wildfire threat assessments and develop the prescriptions. Williams Lake
ARM Corridor Hazard Reduction Alkali Resource Management Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction The project is to thin forests and remove fine fuels from the areas adjacent to principle roads leading in and out of Esk'etemc communities.Up to 100 m on either side of the main roads were treated in order to improve the safe evacuation of local residents in the case of a wildfire.This project follows the plan previously funded by FESBC. The project employed 2 first nations from Alkali Resource Management Ltd., and inviting surrounding first nation communities to join in on the plan to make suggestions, and have input on where there are risks threatened by any possible future wildland fires. The first nation communities that were included were: Esk’etemc, Dog Creek, Canoe Creek, and Sugar Cane.Alkali Resource Management crews were employed to undertake the forest thinning and fuel management. Alklali Lake
WLCF Landscape Level Fuel Break Williams Lake Community Forest LP Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is within the Williams Lake Community Forest and the goal is to create a landscape level fuel break to assist in protecting the City of Williams Lake. The break will be placed all along the hydro powerlines and essentially widens the break area on either side of the powerline by reducing the amount of flamable fuel in those areas. Logging debris and small diameter wood will be sent to the Williams Lake bio-energy facility. Williams Lake
Fox Mountain Fire Abatement Project Celtic Engineering Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project will involve undertaking a wildfire risk reduction treatment including a West Fraser Mills Cutting Permit and in between those blocks, crews will manually thin and prune over dense Douglas-fir stands. This project aims to reduce the fire hazard adjacent to the Williams Lake city boundaries on Fox Mountain. The area is approximately 46 ha. A prescription will be developed by West Fraser Mills including layout, GIS and professional services and will be implemented by removing fine fuels, brushing, piling, burning, spacing, etc. The project output will be 34.9 ha of treatment Williams Lake
Barkerville Historic Town Wildfire Fuel Treatment phase 2 Barkerville Historic Town & Park governed by The Barkerville Heritage Trust Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is focused on manual treatments for a wildfire fuel break along the west side of the Barkerville Historic Site as per the Barkerville Community Wildfire Protection Plan. These priorities were established jointly with BC Wildfire Service Fuel Management specialists and Quesnel Resource District staff. Activities will include manual thinning, pruning, and removal of forest floor fuels. This will result in better protection for this cultural treasure. Barkerville
Wildfire Risk Reduction on Woodlot Licence 1413, Northwest of Quesnel A.J. Waters and Associates Inc. Wildfire Risk Reduction The goal of this project was to enhance safety and reduce wildfire risk in a key transportation corridor along Blackwater Road, northwest of Quesnel BC. High hazard fuels were removed and the timber stand was thinned to provide a more fire resilient stand. A forested area north of the Blackwater Road consisted of trees that regenerated after the area was selectively logged 60 years ago. Much of this area included dead pine trees, which were removed, and the remaining stand was thinned and pruned to remove ladder fuels and create a fire-resilient stand.Forest floor fuels were piled and burned and some of the recoverable fibre was taken to a small chipping plant. Quesnel
Primary Fuel Break - Forest Grove West Fraser Mills Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is being jointly delivered by West Fraser Mills and the Canim Lake Indian Band and will result in the creation of al landscape level Fuel Break.The resultant treatment will help protect the community of Forest Grove and adjacent rural infrastructure froma Wildfire. Forest Grove
Big Bar Wildfire Risk Reduction - Phase 2 Zanzibar Holdings Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is focused on reducing wildfire risk in forested areas near Big Bar Lake, which is located approximately 40 kilometres west of Clinton, B.C. The areas were identified as priorities for wildfire risk mitigation by the 100 Mile House Resource District. The joint project with Stswecem'c Xgat'tem First Nation (formerly Dog Creek Indian Band & Canoe Creek Indian Band) has provided employment for local crews for two years. Crews worked to create landscape-level fuel breaks, 100 to 300 metre-wide areas of reduced fuels by decreasing the number of trees, pruning others from the ground up to shoulder height to remove ladder fuels, and clearing ground fuels through piling and burning. The fuel break runs for several kilometres in key areas around Big Bar Lake. Future treatments such as low-intensity prescribed burns or cutting of new growth will be required in the area to ensure the objectives of the fuel break are maintained. Clinton
Anahim Fuel Break Construction - Phase 2 West Fraser Mills Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is a continuation of another related FESBC supported project. This second phase carries on and implemented the remainder of the landscape level wildfire break. The outcome is a linear barrier that serves as a baseline for wildfire protection. This line connects physical features such as roads and power lines and enables wildfire fighters to safely take a stand in the event of a large wildfire. The project employed local contractors and was lead by West Fraser Mills Ltd.West Fraser Mills did not receive any fibre from the project and all pulp logs and sawlogs were sold at market prices. Pulp was sorted and sold to West Chilcotin Forest Products to be shipped over the mountains to Bella Coola and onward to the Vancouver log market. The wildfire break can be modified and updated over time enabling a sustainable long term defense strategy for the communities of Anahim Lake and Nimpo Lake. Anahim Lake
Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments Within 100 Mile Community Forest - Phase 2 100 Mile Development Corporation Wildfire Risk Reduction The Forest Enhancement Society of BC (FESBC) is supporting three projects within the 100 Mile House Community Forest which will reduce wildfire risk in priority interface areas. This project phase includes the development of site-specific forestry prescriptions and the implementation of various fuel management treatments. The total area to be planned and prescribed over the four-year period is estimated to be 345 hectares and operational treatments are planned for 260 hectares. Project activities include surveys, treatment prescription development, harvesting, tree thinning, pruning, and reduction of fuel loading in areas surrounding the communities of 100 Mile House, Horse Lake, and Lone Butte. 100 Mile House
Lac La Hache Wildfire Mitigation Zanzibar Holdings Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project focused on assessment of potential fuel management treatment options on a 15-kilometre long and 100-metre wide interface fuel management area abutting private properties alongside Highway 97 in Lac La Hache, BC. Activities also included fuel reduction treatments adjacent to Lac La Hache Provincial Park. The project area is important winter range for mule deer, so another goal of the work is to enhance habitat values while reducing wildfire risk and removing potential fuel. 100 Mile House
South Canim Lake Fuel Management Treatments adjacent to Canim Lake Indian Reserve Canim Lake Indian Band Wildfire Risk Reduction The objective of this project is to complete wildfire risk reduction treatments of priority areas adjacent to Canim Lake Indian Band and private land. Activities will include prescription development, harvesting, understory pruning and thinning, and forest floor fuel piling and burning. If feasible, the residual fibre resulting from the treatment will be utilized by secondary fibre users for bioenergy. Canim Lake
Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment - Interface Fuel Management - 100 Mile Community Forest 100 Mile Development Corporation Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is focused on areas near and adjacent to neighbourhoods with the goal of reducing wildfire risk to homes and recreational areas. Activities include layout, prescriptions, and implementing treatments on additional areas north and south of Horse Lake. Work will also include the completion of activities in areas treated last fall. The goal is to continue to utilize the woody material removed in creating the fuel breaks as biomass, minimizing the amount of material that needs to be burned. In the initial treatment area, covered under a related project, all the pulp fibre and a significant portion of the residual waste fibre was removed and utilized. The avoidance of pile burning reduces greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. 100 Mile House
Quesnel Community Wildfire Protection Plan - Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments - Phase 2 The City of Quesnel Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is a continuation of another related FESBC-supported project and includes planning, prescription and treatment work focused on meeting City of Quesnel Community Wildfire Protection Plan priorities. These priorities were established jointly with BC Wildfire Service fuel management specialists and Quesnel Resource District staff. Activities may include planning and prescription development, harvesting, understory pruning and thinning, and forest floor fuel piling and burning. If feasible, the residual fibre resulting from the treatment will be utilized instead of burned. Quesnel
?Esdilagh Fire Prevention & Mitigation Project Esdilagh Development Corporation Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project involved conducting wildfire risk assessments in areas adjacent to the ?Esdilagh First Nations community and a large landscape-level primary fuel break east of the community. Following the initial assessments, fuel management prescriptions were developed for the 620 ha landscape level fuel break. Alexandria
Anahim Lake Fuel Break - Phase 1 West Fraser Mills Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This is the first phase of a two part project to protect the communities of Anahim Lake and Nimpo Lake. This first phase identified the priority areas where a landscape level break would assist in wildfire protection. West Fraser Mills Ltd. undertook this project with the local First Nations and engaged with BCWS to determine appropriate treatment locations. The mapping and permiting phases were complete and obtained full support from the Ministry. West Fraser Mills will not receive any fibre from this project and undertook it for the relationships with local communities. Contracts for thinning were implemented with intially selective thinning and shaded fuel breaks being the desired outcome. The project's remoteness and limited contractor resources contribued to revisions to the plan which were then implemented in Phase 2 of the project. Anahim Lake
Ground Truthing and Prescription Development Cariboo Woodlot Association Wildfire Risk Reduction This proposal involved ground truthing provincial wildfire threat data in Cariboo-Chilcotin woodlots and developing prescriptions with woodlot licensees: wildfire management, assessing burned stands to utilize wood and, if necessary, improve their condition. Prescriptions were developed from the ground truthing field data collection and a selected number of woodlot tenures adjacent to communities were then prioritized for treatments. Various
Nazko - Pine Treatment and Fire Hazard Reduction Nazko Logging Ltd. Partnership Wildfire Risk Reduction This project involved harvesting and removal of beetle damaged trees to reduce wildfire risk and reforesting the landbase to bring it back into production.A portion of the harvesting debris and small diameter wood was utilized for pulp, pellet, or bio-fuels. The avoidance of pile burning reduces greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Nazko
Borland Valley Operational Fuel Treatment Project B.A. Blackwell & Associates Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This was a demonstration project for fuel management treatment and mule deer winter range habitat enhancement. The project included biomass removal and recovery of merchantable timber through machine and hand work. The treatments provided demonstration sites and examples for future treatments, wildfire hazard mitigation by reducing fuel loading through the removal of ladder and fine fuels, and enhanced walking trails. These measures also improved habitat features for mule deer. Where possible, timber was sold and residual fibre was recovered for sale in the local biomass market. 150 Mile House
Fuel Prescription Pilot - Borland Valley B.A. Blackwell & Associates Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This was a demonstration project for fuel management treatment and mule deer winter range habitat enhancement. The project included biomass removal and recovery of merchantable timber through machine and hand work. The treatments provided demonstration sites and examples for future treatments, wildfire hazard mitigation by reducing fuel loading through the removal of ladder and fine fuels, and enhanced walking trails. These measures also improved habitat features for mule deer. Where possible, timber was sold and residual fibre was recovered for sale in the local biomass market. 150 Mile House
Landscape-Level Fuel Break Pilot Williams Lake Community Forest LP Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is to undertake the initial planning, prescriptions and treatments for a wildfire fuel break in the Williams Lake Community Forest. This project is harmonized with other projects also funded by FESBC. The initial areas total approximately 300 ha and involve full collaboration with BCWS, District Cariboo Chilctotin and the City of Williams Lake and it's partner, the T'exelcemc (Williams Lake Band). Initial treatments were designed for continuous improvement and feedback collection from stakeholders so that the outcomes lead to further successful work in protecting the City of Williams Lake. Williams Lake
Wildfire Mitigation - Bark Beetle Williams Lake Community Forest LP Wildfire Risk Reduction This funding supported a joint FLNRORD and local community project to helicopter salvage harvest beetle-killed Douglas-fir trees on inaccessible steep slopes. The project is adjacent to the city of Williams Lake and will reduce community wildfire risk and assist in controlling a bark beetle outbreak. Williams Lake
Fuel Reduction Treatments Adjacent to the Community of Nazko, BC Nazko Logging Ltd. Partnership Wildfire Risk Reduction The project objective was to identify and treat stands within five kilometers of the communities of Nazko and Kluskus heavily damaged by mountain pine bark beetle which resulted in significant accumulations of fuel which would create extreme fire conditions in the event of a wildfire. This fuel loading increases the wildfire risk to communities and interface areas. The work was completed in two phases including fuel management planning and prescription development, and related fuel management treatments. All work was completed on Crown forest land adjacent to the communities. After the treatment was completed, an electrical line started a fire. The treatment was effective in preventing catastrophic damage. Nazko
Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments near Nazko, BC NAZBEC Limited Partnership Wildfire Risk Reduction The focus of this project is to reduce wildfire risk on priority areas around the community of Nazko, BC. Priority treatment areas were identified jointly with BC Wildfire Service Fuel Management specialists and Quesnel Resource District staff. Activities will include planning and prescription development, harvesting, understory pruning and thinning, and forest floor fuel piling and burning. Nazko
Project Title Project Proponent Society Purpose Full Proposal Description Closest Community
Kootenay Boundary Region
Full Forest Utilization for Mercer Celgar Pulp Mill Mercer Celgar Forest Carbon Mercer Celgar is actively working to facilitate and increase fibre utilization, recovering material that would otherwise be burned on site. Increased recovery results in less burning which avoids the immediate release of carbon into the atmosphere associated with the burning of wood wastes. Utilization can minimize the overall residual fibre on site by factors of 10 to 90%. This project involves working with forest tenure holders to increase fibre utilization and support the transportation of residual fibre for use at Mercer Celgar facilities. Castlegar
Skookumchuck Pulp Bush Grinding Program Skookumchuck Pulp Inc. Forest Carbon Through this project, Skookumchuck Pulp Mill will be able to recover uneconomic fibre from the Rocky Mountain trench area, resulting in the reduction of carbon emissions by utilizing the residual waste fibre left over from harvesting to produce green energy instead. The ground wood waste will be used at Skookumchuck Pulp Mill's cogeneration plant to make green electricity, resulting in an overall reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding pile burning of the residual waste. Skookumchuck
Kalesnikoff Utilization/Incremental Haul of Residual Fibre Kalesnikoff Lumber Co. Ltd./Mercer Celgar Forest Carbon This project supports the utilization of fibre that would otherwise be burned in the forest by supporting the recovery and transportation of the uneconomic fibre. The project also reduces costs associated with potential wildfire mitigation work by removing logging debris from cut blocks as more non-merchantable biomass will be removed to a secondary manufacturing site. This results in an overall increase in fibre recovery and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions created from burning residual fibre. Castlegar
Cooper Creek Utilization/Incremental Haul of Residual Fibre Cooper Creek Cedar Ltd/Mercer Celgar Forest Carbon The goal of this project was complete stand harvesting and utilization. During the harvesting phase, which typically only targets sawlog quality wood, all uneconomic fibre and dead-standing logs were also cleared and brought to a landing for sorting. At the landing, all uneconomic fibre was sorted out and then trucked alongside the sawlogs, maximizing fibre recovery and utilization. This activity significantly reduced the volume of uneconomic fibre left on site to be burned or left as potential wildfire fuel which, in turn, reduces potential greenhouse gas emissions resulting from burning fibre. Balfour
Utilizing Residual Fibre on Nakusp Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Area Nakusp and Area Community Forest - NACFOR Forest Carbon The goal of this project is to recover about 1600 cubic meters of residual fibre left over from harvesting close to 20 hectares near Nakusp, BC. Removing this fibre from site, instead of leaving it on site to be burned, results in an overall reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The removed residual fibre will be converted into pulp products which continue to store carbon long-term. The site will also be replanted with seedlings to continue carbon sequestration on site. An additional benefit of this activity is the reduction of wildfire risk through the removal of potential fuel from an identified high risk wildfire area. Nakusp
Harrop Residual Fibre Utilization and Incremental Haul Harrop-Procter Community Co-operative Forest Carbon This project is focused in the community forest around Harrop and Procter, located on the south shore of the west arm of Kootenay Lake. The aim of the Harrop-Procter Community Co-operative (HPCC) is to reduce wildfire risk by thinning dense forest to develop a shaded fuel break while retaining the largest and most fire-resistant trees and to utilize any fibre removed. Instead of being burned on site, residual and otherwise uneconomic fibre will be transported for use as pulp logs resulting in an overall reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding burning and reducing potential wildfire fuel loading. Harrop
2020 Residual Fibre Utilization Project Stella-Jones Inc. Forest Carbon The goal of this project is to recover residual fibre left over from harvesting activity around Revelstoke BC and augment the utilization of this material instead of it being left behind on site and burned. Transporting the fibre to a pulp mill avoids greenhouse gas emissions which result from pile burning and enhances overall fibre utilization. Revelstoke
Skookumchuck Pulp - Residual Fibre Utilization Skookumchuck Pulp Inc. Forest Carbon The goal of this project is to assist in using low value pulp logs currently considered uneconomical to Skookumchuck Pulp Inc.’s mill. The project enables the utilization of approximately 110,000 cubic metres of residual forest fibre from the Cranbrook and Golden Timber Supply Areas that otherwise would have been burned. Skookumchuck
Utilizing Cedar Bark and Wood Waste Stella-Jones Inc. Forest Carbon This project aims to increase fibre utilization by augmenting the transportation of residual fibre from the Revelstoke pole yard peeling facility to a power producing facility. Project activities include the grinding and hauling of residual fibre from the unusable ends of cedar poles instead of the usual disposal method of burning or landfilling. Revelstoke
Fibre Recovery in Baker Mountain Road Area BCTS Kootenay Business Area Fibre Recovery This project aims to reduce wildfire risk and enhance wildlife habitat in a 143 hectare area adjacent to the City of Cranbrook and the Cranbrook Community Forest. The goal is to recover 11,000 cubic metres of pulp and sawlogs in addition to any residual fibre for use as biomass. This activity will remove wildfire fuel loading and result in a more open forest with higher timber and increased wildlife values. Cranbrook
Recovering Residual Fibre from Run Glading Red Mountain Resort Fibre Recovery This project aimed to remove about 30 per cent of standing dead and damaged trees within in a treed skiing area in the Red Mountain Resort Controlled Recreation Area (CRA). The 10 hectare project area is located in the Topping Creek drainage on the north slope of Granite Mountain and has year-round recreation use, ecological and watershed values. FESBC funding allowed for selective cutting of the stand to remove fuel in form of standing dead and diseased trees, decreasing crown connectivity and retaining healthy tree cover. The project resulted in the rehabilitation of low-value stands, reduced the risk of wildfire, allowed the low-value wood to be transported for use at a local pulp mill, improved recreational values and reduced greenhouse gas emissions by eliminating the burning of low value fibre. Rossland
Feasibility Analysis of Intensive Fibre Recovery City of Cranbrook Fibre Recovery An analysis of wildfire prevention models within the community wildland-urban interface (WUI). Discussion will include cost sharing methods for low value timber harvesting and biomass removal within the WUI. Cranbrook
LP Golden Residual Delivery for Hog Fuel Louisiana-Pacific Canada Ltd. Fibre Recovery The incremental haul and/or grinding of residual fibre to be used for hog fuel for the LP Corp's power facility in Golden, BC. Golden
Westview Estates Wildfire Risk Reduction Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Habitat Enhancement This is primarily a fuel-management project benefitting the rural community of Westview Estates, but the work also supports improved wildlife habitat and ungulate range conditions. The project included tree removal and limbing to decrease wildfire risk and increase forest floor productivity. Cranbrook
Implementation of Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments for Slocan Area Slocan Integral Forestry Cooperative (SIFCO) Wildfire Risk Reduction Slocan Integral Forestry Cooperative (SIFCo), the community forest based in the Slocan Valley in the Southern Interior of BC, is working towards completing their Landscape-Level Strategic Wildfire Protection Plan. The innovative plan lays out 12 Strategic Fuel Management Zones located across main fire movement corridors. These zones create large defendable fuel breaks, each spanning hundreds of hectares. SIFCo's plan articulates five types of treatments to be used in those zones, including an ecosystem restoration treatment type which reintroduces fire through prescribed burns. The fuel breaks created through this new approach to treatment will leave forest behind and not a bare landscape. Slocan
Dry Gulch Forest Fuel Reduction Wildlands Eco-Forestry Inc Wildfire Risk Reduction The goal of this project is to reduce wildfire risk in the Dry Gulch Creek area, approximately two kilometres north of the Shuswap Indian Band Reserve, as identified in the Shuswap Indian Band's Community Wildfire Protection Plan. The overall area has also been identified as a wildlife travel connector to the Columbia Wetlands wildlife area. Wildfire fuel management activities will include a combination of mechanical and manual tree falling, thinning, removal of ladder fuels, and disposal of removed fibre. This work will reduce the wildfire threat to the local communities. Invermere
Central Kootenay Collaborative Regional Wildfire Risk Reduction Planning Group - Phase 2 Support Regional District of Central Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction Effective wildfire risk reduction near communities requires good planning and coordination between many stakeholders, which includes the Ministry of Forest, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (including the Districts and BC Wildfire Service staff), local governments, First Nations, forest industry and various public interest groups. This collaborative planning project focuses on bringing these parties together to identify priority areas for wildfire risk reduction treatments and determine who should lead and implement the required work. Some of the areas set as a priority for treatments will be in the wildland urban interface as identified in Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPP) throughout the Regional District Central Kootenay. The areas may also be overlapping areas identified for harvesting by one of the local forest licensees. Priority areas of interest include areas on Crown land adjacent to where the wildfire threat is high or extreme based on forest fuel type and proximity to residences and other critical infrastructure. This project funding is to allow for the continuation of the work of the newly established collaborative planning group initially funded by FESBC. Nelson & Surrounding Area
Selous Creek Wildfire Risk Reduction Prescription Regional District of Central Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction This planning project aims to develop a community wildfire protection prescription for the Selous Creek Treatment Unit that is supported by the Regional District of Central Koontenay's and the City of Nelson's Community Wildfire Protection Plans. The project area is immediately adjacent Nelson city limits, the Nelson Selous Creek water intake, and valuable critical infrastructure including historic trestles on the Burlington Northern Rail Trail. The intent is to develop fuel modification prescriptions for the area proposed to be harvested by Kalesnikoff Lumber in identified priority areas of interest so as to maintain biodiversity, enhance fire and forest health resilience from the perspective of climate change and reduce the forest fuel hazards through fuel modification treatments. Nelson
Champion Lakes Park Forest Fuels Management BC Parks - Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction The project site location is Champion Lakes Park, southeast of Genelle, BC and northwest of Fruitvale, BC. This close to 50 hectare fuel reduction project is intended to reduce wildfire risk to park visitors, park values and infrastructure, nearby private properties, and adjacent Crown and private forest land. There was significant fuel loading in this area due to mountain pine beetle and small diameter conifers. The work included reducing flammable wood in the park by removing sufficient ground and ladder fuels and the thinning and spacing of juvenile trees and pruning of mature trees. Fruitvale
Kaslo and District Community Forest Society Wildfire Protection Planning Kaslo and District Community Forest Society Wildfire Risk Reduction Planning and survey activity under this project aims to assist with the development and implementation of a landscape-level wildfire protection plan within the Kaslo and District Community Forest (KDCF) that builds on the existing 2017 Kaslo and Area D Community Wildfire Protection Plan. The KDCF is a 32,417 hectare area in southeastern BC, bordering the western shore of Kootenay Lake within the ecologically diverse West Kootenay Region. The final report will integrate and share stakeholder knowledge and facilitate multi-use planning of operational, recreational and firefighting access to identified, mapped, and flow-rated tactical water sources. Fuel management prescriptions will target uneconomic ground and ladder fuels and aim to preserve merchantable timber. Kaslo
Queens Bay Wildfire Risk Reduction Planning and Prescription Regional District of Central Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction Building on the FESBC funded Collaborative Planning Pilot project in 2017, the RDCK developed a community wildfire protection prescription for the community of Queens Bay. The two treatment units developed have been identified in the RDCK Electoral Area E CWPP update as priority areas. The treatment areas are immediately north and south of the isolated community of Queens Bay on the west shore of Kootenay Lake. The community of Queens Bay has demonstrated a proactive approach to wildfire mitigation. The community was the first in the RDCK to achieve Community FireSmart Recognition in 2015 and has maintained its status since then. Almost all of the domestic and irrigation water for this community comes from gravity feed systems, many of the sources for which are within the proposed Treatment Units. The community wildfire protection prescription for the Queens Bay Treatment Units have been developed in collaboration between Cooper Creek Cedar / Porcupine Lumber, who hold the forest license for the area, the community of Queens Bay and the RDCK with the objective of reducing surface fuel loading, potential crown fire intensities and harvesting with projected climate change influences in mind. Queens Bay
West Arm Park Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment BC Parks - Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction This collaborative project is focused on wildfire fuel management treatments to create a landscape level fuel break in a 12-hectare area along Lasca Creek Road. This treatment will reduce the tree density and woody fuel in order to lower the wildfire risk to the adjacent area and West Arm Park. It is anticipated this prescription will provide a shaded fuel break and will reduce the risk of wildfire to the adjacent properties and community, protecting the area and park values. A shaded fuel break would provide opportunities for BC Wildfire crews to have a chance to fight a fire starting in the park, reduce the threat to the adjacent community, and protect park values if the fire started in the community and spread into the park. Nelson
Arrow Mountain Wildfire Risk Reduction Creston Valley Forest Corporation Wildfire Risk Reduction The town of Creston BC is located less than one kilometre south of Arrow Mountain. Given the town’s close proximity to a densely forested area, concerns have steadily grown regarding the danger Arrow Mountain would pose to the community if a wildfire were to start. The goal of this project is to reduce forest fuel to reduce the risk of wildfires to the community of Creston through fuel management activities such as overstory thinning, and the removal of ladder and ground fuels. These alterations to the current forest conditions should reduce wildfire behaviour to allow for more successful containment in the event of a wildfire, which would result the protection of homes. Creston
Akisqnuk Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Akisqnuk First Nation Wildfire Risk Reduction This wildfire risk reduction treatment location is adjacent to the Akisqnuk First Nation reserve on Crown land, just north of the community of Fairmont Hot Springs. Activity will target the removal of non-merchantable stems using hand and mechanized techniques, and the pruning of remaining stems. The outcome of this project will be dramatically reduced fuel loads, risk of catastrophic wildfire, a net carbon sink due to the promotion of large diameter trees, and improved wildlife habitat through returning to a more natural stand structure of open and mixed forest. Fairmont Hot Springs / Akisqnuk
Slocan Landscape Level WildfirePlan Implementation Slocan Integral Forestry Cooperative (SIFCO) Wildfire Risk Reduction Wildfire fuel break implementation as identified in the Slocan Valley Landscape Level Wildfire Protection Plan. Slocan
Jewel Lake Fuel Wildfire Risk Reduction Project West Boundary Community Forest Wildfire Risk Reduction Jewel Lake is a popular recreational area for tourists and local residents attracting thousands of campers, boaters, fishers, and cottagers every year. There is also a population of permanent residents who reside at Jewel Lake all year. The West Boundary Community Forest is on the north and south facing slopes of this lake valley. This project is focused on reducing the volume of wildfire fuel accumulated over the years that is now posing a high risk to the area. There's only one road providing access into and out of this residential and recreational area, which poses a significant problem in the case of a wildfire. Reducing fuel loading will increase safety for both residents and visitors and help protect the area in the event of a wildfire. Greenwood
Midway Fire Risk Reduction Project West Boundary Community Forest Wildfire Risk Reduction This project area south of Midway, BC is very popular for hikers and bikers and project activity will enhance public safety by removing snags and danger trees along the trail system. The goal is to improve overall forest health by removing beetle-infested trees, blow down, trees with heart rot, dead standing trees (snags), and up to 40 per cent of the smaller-diameter Douglas-fir. This will result in fuel mitigation, fir bark beetle control, and increase interpretive forest attributes and improve the trail as a recreational resource. This project will be seen by the thousands of hikers and school groups who regularly use the trail system, providing an excellent opportunity to showcase how integrated forest management can improve both forest health and recreational values. Midway
Procter Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Harrop-Procter Community Co-operative Wildfire Risk Reduction The Regional District of Central Kootenay (RDCK) Area 'E' Community Wildfire Protection Plan and the RDCK Collaborative Planning Group both identified the West Procter Face, one kilometre south of the Village of Procter, as a top priority for wildfire fuel reduction. This project will reduce wildfire risks by significantly reducing fuel loading in a critical interface area. Surface and ladder fuels will be removed and the overstory will be thinned. Project activities include mechanized logging and thinning, log hauling, and post-treatment cleanup to remove surface and ladder fuels with the goal of recovering and utilizing as much of the removed fibre as possible in order to achieve climate change objectives. The project will rehabilitate a low-value stand and encourage the growth of a more open and diverse forest stand. Nelson
Nakusp Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Nakusp and Area Community Forest - NACFOR Wildfire Risk Reduction The goal of this project is to reduce wildfire risk in areas identified in the Regional District of Central Kootenay (RDCK) Area 'K' and Nakusp 2018 Community Wildfire Protection Plans as having a high-to-moderate wildfire risk. The intention is to create a series of strategically placed fuel breaks surrounding the community of Nakusp that will act as a last line of defence against an approaching wildfire. Treating these areas will provide opportunities for fire suppression, reduce fire intensity and rate of spread, and complement ongoing FireSmart initiatives. Areas are adjacent to the community and will be part of a series of strategically located treatment sites designed to defend the Village from wildfires. Project outcomes will include the reduction of surface fuel loading, increased height to live crown ratio, decreased stand density, and the removal of dead and dying stems. Keeping overstory and deciduous trees, along with decreased stand density, will also enhance wildlife habitat. Nakusp
Glade Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Kalesnikoff Lumber Co. Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction The goal of this project is to reduce wildfire risk by removing forest fuels in a logged area near the community of Glade BC. These residual fuels, if left on site, would increase the risk of high-intensity wildfire if a fire ignited. Activity will include piling, burning, or increased utilization of residual material left over from harvesting activity. Castlegar
Selous Creek Post Harvesting Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Regional District of Central Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction This project focuses on the reduction of forest fuel left over after Kalesnikoff Lumber completes their logging in an area adjacent to the community of Nelson BC, which was identified as a high risk to be impacted from wildfire in the Regional District of Central Kootenay's Community Wildfire Protection Plan. Wildfire risk will be reduced with harvesting, retaining fire-resistant species, and reducing surface fuels post treatment by hauling the residual fibre to the nearby Mercer-Celgar pulp mill. Removing the residual fibre also increases fibre utilization and reduces greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding on-site burning. These activities will reduce wildfire intensity and the overall wildfire risk to the City of Nelson. Nelson
Queens Bay Post Harvesting Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Regional District of Central Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction This project focuses on the reduction of woody fuel left over after Cooper Creek Cedar's logging in an area adjacent to the small community of Queens Bay, BC. Wildfire risk will be reduced by harvesting, reducing tree-to-tree contact, retaining fire-resistant species, and reducing surface fuels by hauling the residual fibre to the nearby Mercer-Celgar pulp mill. These activities will reduce the conditions for extreme wildfire intensity and help protect the isolated community from wildfire risk. Removing the residual fibre also increases fibre utilization and reduces greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding onsite burning. Balfour
Baynes Lake Cemetery Pasture Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction This is an interface treatment project located adjacent to the community of Baynes Lake. The goal is to reduce fuel loading near the community using mastication equipment and hand slashing. This will be followed by a prescribed burn and an invasive plant treatment in the spring or fall of 2021. This significant project will tie into neighbouring ecosystem restoration treatments and contribute to a landscape-level fuel break while providing open forest and range ecosystem benefits. Elko
Post Harvesting Wildfire Risk Reduction on Kootenay BCTS Areas BCTS Kootenay Business Area Wildfire Risk Reduction There are two locations for this wildfire risk reduction project--Kokanee Creek (near the community of Longbeach) and Smallwood Creek (near the community of Beasley). Kokanee Creek is on the west arm of Kootenay Lake located approximately 20 km north of Nelson, and Smallwood Creek is located about 14km west of Nelson. The areas near Kokanee Creek have been identified as high to extreme risk for wildfire. The areas located near Smallwood are identified as moderate to extreme and both project areas are adjacent to private lots containing infrastructure. Project activity aims to reduce wildfire risk by removing high hazard fuels, retaining fire resistant tree species, and reducing crown closure and removing surface fuels post harvesting. Nelson
Procter Wildfire Risk Reduction Prescriptions Harrop-Procter Community Co-operative Wildfire Risk Reduction This project was aimed at preparing prescriptions for wildfire risk reduction treatments on approximately 140 hectares within the boundaries of the Harrop-Procter Community Forest. The areas were identified in the Regional District of Central Kootenays Community Wildfire Protection Plan as being at high risk of wildfires. The proposed treatments will be coordinated with other forest management objectives for the community forest, including rehabilitation of low-value stands and recovering fibre normally left for burning. As wildfire risk reduction treatments are not a legal requirement, this funding will assist the community forest with the costs of activities over and above normal forest management. Procter
Fuel Reduction Treatments in the RDCK Near Canyon, Lister, and Kokanee Park Regional District of Central Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction This project aimed to reduce wildfire risk near the communities of Canyon and Lister, and in Kokanee Provincial Park. These areas were identified as high priority areas for fuel management treatments in the Regional District of Central Kootenay Community Wildfire Protection Plan. Creston / Nelson
Rock Creek Ecosystem Restoration Prescription Development West Boundary Community Forest Wildfire Risk Reduction The primary goal of this project was to develop prescriptions to restore and enhance the ecosystem values for wildlife. As the treatment area is adjacent to the community of Rock Creek, the treatment will also reduce the wildfire risk, improve the health of the stand, and increase fibre utilization by the local sawmill and pulp mill. This will also contribute to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Rock Creek
Sheep Mountain Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction This project aims to reduce wildfire risk through reducing fuel loading near the communities of Elko and Baynes Lake. These fuel management treatments also restore wildlife habitat and increase the availability of forage grass for domestic livestock grazing. Elko
Quartz Lake Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction The primary goal of this project is to remove understory vegetation and potential wildfire fuel in forested areas near Quartz Lake, located east of Skookumchuck BC. Other project activities include invasive plant control and grass seeding to reduce wildfire risk. Skookumchuck
Rushmere Ecosystem Restoration & Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is focused on wildfire risk reduction near the community of Rushmere, BC, located 10 km south of Invermere BC and Rushmere Provincial Park. Activities include the hand slashing of smaller trees, bucking, piling, and pile burning. The project also enhances access to grazing for wildlife and domestic livestock. Rushmere
Duck Pasture Wildfire Risk Reduction Management Treatment Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction The goal of this project was to reduce wildfire risk by removing fuel though slashing trees less than 20 centimeters diameter in an area 10 km south of the community of Jaffray, BC which is located 20km from Elko, BC. This was followed by prescribed burning as the wildfire fuel in the area is historically maintained by natural fire activity. Elko
Cranbrook Wildfire Risk Reduction Prescription Development Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction This project focused on the development of fuel management prescriptions for priority areas with the goal of reducing wildfire risk near the City of Cranbrook. The work was completed by Ktunaxa Nation-owned natural resource consulting company Nupqu with the support of the local regional district. Cranbrook
Slocan Valley Landscape Level Wildfire Protection Slocan Integral Forestry Cooperative (SIFCO) Wildfire Risk Reduction Slocan Integral Forestry Cooperative (SIFCo), the community forest based in the Slocan Valley in the Southern Interior of BC, is working towards completing their Landscape-Level Strategic Wildfire Protection Plan. The innovative plan lays out 12 Strategic Fuel Management Zones located across main fire movement corridors. These zones create large defendable fuel breaks, each spanning hundreds of hectares. SIFCo's plan articulates five types of treatments to be used in those zones, including an ecosystem restoration treatment type which reintroduces fire through prescribed burns. The 185 hectares of fuel breaks created through this new approach to treatment will leave forest behind and not a bare landscape. Slocan Valley
Establishment of a Central Kootenay Collaborative Regional Wildfire Risk Reduction Planning Group Regional District of Central Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction Effective wildfire risk reduction near communities requires good planning and coordination between many stakeholders, which includes the Ministry of Forest, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (including the Districts and BC Wildfire Service staff), local governments, First Nations, forest industry and various public interest groups. This collaborative planning project focuses on bringing these parties together to identify priority areas for wildfire risk reduction treatments and determine who should lead and implement the works required. Some of the areas set as a priority for treatments may be in the wildland urban interface as identified in Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPP) throughout the Regional District Central Kootenay, or could be overlapping areas identified for harvesting by one of the local forest licensees. Priority areas of interest include areas on Crown land adjacent to and generally up wind of communities where the wildfire threat is high or extreme based on forest fuel type and proximity to residences and other critical infrastructure. Nelson Area
?aq'am Prescribed Burn Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction This project was a partnership between the BC Wildfire Service and the community of ?aq'am, located five kilometres from Cranbrook BC within the traditional territory of the Ktunaxa Nation. Project activity included a prescribed burn on close to 182 hectares of Crown land for grassland ecosystem restoration and wildfire fuel management. Benefits include habitat improvement for badgers, Lewis woodpecker, elk and mule deer. Cranbrook
Westside Koocanusa Lake Wildfire Risk Reduction/ER Treatments Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction This project focused on wildfire risk reduction in forested areas close to Newgate, BC, located on Lake Koocanusa. Activity included hand slashing, pile burning, and grass seeding to reduce wildfire risk and enhance forage availability for both wildlife and domestic livestock. Newgate
Silver Springs Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction The goal of this project was to complete fuel management treatments to reduce wildfire risk to the City of Cranbrook and Area C in the Regional District of East Kootenay. Additional project benefits included habitat restoration for wildlife and improved rangeland grazing conditions for cattle. Cranbrook
Cranbrook Community Forest/College of the Rockies Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction The Cranbrook Community Forest and College of the Rockies project is primarily focused on wildfire risk reduction. The work included fuel management and ecosystem restoration treatments to protect and restore Crown land adjacent to the City of Cranbrook and the College of the Rockies. A local logging company was hired to remove commercial timber and pulpwood and all harvesting and post-harvest slash was ground on site and delivered to the Skookumchuck Pulp Mill’s co-generation bioenergy facility. Grinding of the slash waste avoided any burning on site and possible air quality impact on the adjacent City of Cranbrook. The commercial harvesting of sawlogs and pulpwood reduced the cost of post-harvest slashing because it was done at the same time as the commercial harvesting by the same contractor. Further fuel management treatments were completed using a portable chipper on steeper and more sensitive sites. Cranbrook
Fuel Reduction Treatments in the RDCK - Riondel, Kingsgate, Fauquier, and Nelson Regional District of Central Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction This project was for wildfire risk reduction treatments near the communities of Riondel, Kingsgate, Fauquier and the Burlington Rail Trail near Nelson. These areas were identified as high priority areas for fuel management treatments in the Regional District of Central Kootenay's Community Wildfire Protection Plan as being at high risk for wildfires. Nelson Area
West Arm Provincial Park Wildfire Risk Reduction Planning Regional District of Central Kootenay Wildfire Risk Reduction This collaborative project is focused on the development of a wildfire fuel management prescription for treatments to create a landscape-level fuel break in a 12-hectare area along Lasca Creek Road. This treatment will reduce the number of stems per hectare and fuel loading with the goal of lowering wildfire risk to the adjacent area and West Arm Park. This prescription will provide a shaded fuel break and reduce the risk of wildfire to the adjacent properties and community, protecting the area and park values. A shaded fuel break would provide opportunities for BC Wildfire crews to have a better chance to fight fire starting in the park, posing a threat to the adjacent community, or fight the fire to protect park values if a fire started in the community and spread into the park. Nelson Area
May Creek Wildfire Risk Reduction and Habitat Improvement Treatment West Boundary Community Forest Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is a collaboration between the West Boundary Community Forest (WBCF) and the Forest Enhancement Society of BC (FESBC), with support from the Osoyoos Indian Band, and is focused on the South Area/Kootenay Boundary Region/Selkirk District/Boundary Timber Supply Area, three kilometres west of Grand Forks. The focus is on reducing excessive fuel loads to mitigate catastrophic wildfire risks and helping to mitigate mid-term timber supply shortfalls by facilitating access to marginal stands. Dead and dry pine has been converted into bio-energy and wildlife habitat was improved through project activity. Future air quality improvements will be realized by managing emissions related to prescribed fire treatments, as opposed to emissions resulting from a wildfire. Grand Forks
Westview Estates - Landscape Fuel Break Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction This is a wildfire fuel management project involving the removal of small trees for near the rural community of Westview Estates. Secondary project benefits include improved wildlife browsing and cattle grazing. Cranbrook
Strauss Road Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society Wildfire Risk Reduction The activity for this project included managing two stands for more natural open forest conditions with the goal of reducing wildfire threat and restoring habitat and rangeland conditions for several wildlife species and domestic livestock. Decades of fire suppression has led to the in-growth of too many trees, which has created extreme fire risk and degraded wildlife habitat. This treatment is being implemented in conjunction with one of the local forest licensees to optimize cost efficacy. Cranbrook
Kootenay FireSmart Initiative FESBC Wildfire Risk Reduction The goal of this project was to support the establishment of a FireSmart education program for the Kootenay region, led by the Columbia Basin Trust. Various
Project Title Project Proponent Society Purpose Full Proposal Description Closest Community
Northeast Region
Chetwynd Biolog Recovery Duz Cho Logging Limited Partnership Fibre Recovery Utilization of residual waste fibre which will be sold to the Canfor Energy North Pellet plant in Chetwynd, B.C. This project helps to avoid pile burning emissions and improves fibre utilization from existing cutting permits outside the current economic reach for low grade fibre. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Duz Cho Logging Limited is wholly owned by the McLeod Lake Indian Band. Chetwynd
Northeast Region Linear Disturbance Restoration MFLNRORD - Northeast Region Habitat Enhancement This project is the first of a three-phase effort to restore linear features to improve wildlife habitat in the Northeast Region of BC. A linear feature refers to roads, seismic lines, power lines, pipelines, railroads, cut lines, and recreational trails on the land. Wildlife can be adversely affected by linear features in two ways: habitat fragmentation and increased rates of predation due to improved access. This phasefocused on developing a strategic restoration plan for caribou, moose and other important species as little is known regarding habitat restoration needs. The project included development of web portal to house the ecological information. Various
Rehabilitation of Linear Disturbance Features in Northeast BC SERNbc Habitat Enhancement This project focused on the rehabilitation of linear features such as roads, seismic lines, power lines, pipelines, railroads, cut lines, and recreational trails on the land. Activities included planning and implementation of reforestation activities to improve wildlife habitat and to bring land back into timber production. The planted trees will sequester (absorb) carbon and contribute to achieving B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Tumbler Ridge
Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments on the Little Prairie Community Forest Little Prairie Community Forest Inc. Stand Rehabilitation This project in the Little Prairie Community Forest, located north of Chetwynd BC, and is focused on conducting wildfire risk reduction treatments on priority interface zones. Activities will include assessment, prescription development, and applied wildfire risk reduction treatments through mechanical and/or manual treatments. The result will be increased protection for communities, important infrasture, and forest values. Chetwynd
FireSmart - Ft. Nelson First Nations Emergency Services Wildfire Risk Reduction Data collection for a FireSmart and wildfire protection planning pilot project. Outcomes are: individual property FireSmarting, community protection and emergency planning, fuel management, and decision support for assessments, prevention, and insurance providers. Fort Nelson
Project Title Project Proponent Society Purpose Full Proposal Description Closest Community
Omineca Region
Biolog Recovery and Utilization for Energy Plant Fort St. James Fuel Co Limited Partnership Forest Carbon This project enables the Fort St. James Green Energy facility to utilize low-grade pulp and biolog fibre that would otherwise be burned. The fibre will either be trucked in whole log form, or be ground on site and then trucked to the facility. The project will enable several forest tenure holders operating in the Stuart Nechako Resource District to transport the low-grade fibre from harvest blocks to the energy plant. This project helps to support the Province’s greenhouse gas reduction targets. Fort St. James
Recovery and Utilization of Residual Fibre near Mackenzie 1040806 B.CLtd. Forest Carbon This project enables low-grade pulp and biolog fibre that would otherwise be burned to be recovered and trucked to either the East Fraser Fibre chipping plant in Mackenzie or the Fort St. James Green Energy facility. From there, the fibre is then either used in the energy plant or made available for purchase and use by other secondary fibre users in the region such as Mackenzie Pulp. This project helps to support the Province’s greenhouse gas reduction targets by augmenting the transportation of low-grade fibre from harvest blocks to be utilized rather than burned. Mackenzie
Road Rehabilitation in the Burns Lake area SERNbc Forest Carbon This project involved the rehabilitation of inactive forest roads. Activities included the reforestation of old roads to increase the amount of land base contributing to carbon sequestration, timber supply, and wildlife habitat objectives, while supporting the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Burns Lake
Fertilization Application Erafor Forestry Ltd. Forest Carbon This project resulted in fertilization of 5016 ha’s of forested land in the northern portion of the Prince George resource district.Activities included planning, road improvements to access staging sites, and the aerial fertilization treatments. Prince George
Biolog Recovery and Utilization in the Fort St. James area Sasuchan Development Corporation Forest Carbon This project enables the recovery and utilization of low-grade pulp and biolog fibre that would otherwise be burned. The fibre will either be trucked in whole log form, or be ground on site and then trucked to the end use facility. The project helps the Sasuchan Development Corporation move the low-grade fibre from blocks and helps to support the Province’s greenhouse gas reduction targets. Fort St. James
Canfor Pulp - Utilization of Residual Fibre Canfor - Prince George Pulp and Paper Forest Carbon This project enables low-grade pulp fibre that would otherwise be burned to be utilized from areas in the Peace and Fraser-Fort George regional districts and trucked to Canfor Pulp and Paper in Prince George, B.C. Canfor Pulp Prince George will then utilize pulp logs for pulp and paper production. Recovery of the low-grade fibre enhances utilization, reduces greenhouse gas emissions, and helps maintain and generate employment. Prince George
Mackenzie Pulp - Fibre Recovery andUtilization Mackenzie Pulp Mill Corporation Forest Carbon This project enables low-grade pulp fibre that would otherwise be burned to be recovered and trucked to the East Fraser Fibre and Duz Cho chipping plants and then utilized by Mackenzie Pulp. Forest license holders operating in the Mackenzie Resource District are now able to transport low-grade fibre from their harvest blocks to Mackenzie to be utilized rather than burned. This project helps to support the Province’s greenhouse gas reduction targets. Mackenzie
McBride Community Forest - Grinding Roadside Residuals Pacific Bioenergy Fibre Recovery This project enabled the utilization of uneconomic, non-merchantable low-grade fibre accumulations resulting from harvesting activities in the McBride Community Forest. Instead of being burned, the fibre was ground and hauled to the Pacific BioEnergy pellet facility in Prince George. This project helped to support the Province’s greenhouse gas reduction targets, provide employment, and maximize fibre utilization. McBride
Fraser Lake Community Forest - Integrated Haul The Corporation of the Village of Fraser Lake Fibre Recovery This project will help the Fraser Lake Community Forest transport uneconomic residual waste fibre to the Pinnacle Pellet plant in Burns Lake. With FESBC funding, the intended outputs are to remove 17,838 cubic meters of pulp wood from the landscape and for the Fraser Lake Community Forest to sell it to Pinnacle Pellet. Removing the fibre from the landbase will provide three benefits for the Fraser Lake Community Forest: first, there will be economic opportunity to the local area, second, the integrated haul project would allow for a significant reduction in the amount dead and downed pine left on the landscape, and third, the removal of wood that would have been left on site to decay reduces the amount wildfire risk. The utilization of the low value fibre creates jobs in the community forest and supports the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Fraser Lake
Mackenzie Increased Fiber Utilization East Fraser Fiber Fibre Recovery Utilization of residual waste fibre by the East Fraser Chipping plant in Mackenzie, B.C. and further distribution to other secondary fibre users in the North Central Interior. East Fraser Fiber is an independent, whole log chipping plant which has been supplying wood chips to pulp mills for decades. This project will maintain much needed jobs in Mackenzie and help to avoid pile burning emissions as well as improve fibre utilization from existing cutting permits outside the current economic reach for low grade fibre. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Mackenzie
Vanderhoof (VanJam) Wildfire Management Planning SERNbc Wildfire Risk Reduction This project included the review and update of the Vanderhoof and Fort St. James area wildfire management plan, and development of additional fuel management prescriptions to facilitate and guide future treatment activities. The result will be increased protection for communities and infrastructure. Vanderhoof
Kenny Dam Wildfire Planning and Prescriptions SERNbc Wildfire Risk Reduction This project involved the development of an ecosystem restoration plan for the Kenny Dam Wildfire and subsequent development of wildfire treatment prescriptions based on values identified by resource stakeholders, First Nations, and nature of the ecosystem. The result will be safer communities. Vanderhoof
Tabor Mountain Strategic Plan and Implementation Tabor Mountain Recreational Society Stand Rehabilitation The goal of this project was to better align provincial strategy and the Tabor Mountain Recreation Society's Management Plan with the aim to improve long-term management outcomes in the area, located approximately 20 km east of Prince George BC. This process involved a number of components including: (1) mapping and GIS inventory to identify and highlight planning areas, (2) drafting of a strategic plan to coordinate an integrated resource management, (3) reviewing stand management strategies, (4) monitoring effectiveness of activities, and (5) communications and consultation with area stakeholders. The result was improved harmonization of forest recreation with other forest values. Prince George
Fire Hazard Reduction by Utilization of Waste FLNRORD Stuart/Nechako Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is just starting and will involve planning, mapping, and treatments on a priority wildfire fuel break polygon identified by the Stuart Nechako Resource District. Vanderhoof
Highway 39 Fuel Reduction Project District of Mackenzie Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is focused on wildfire risk reduction and includes planning, prescriptions, and treatment on high-priority polygons along the Hwy 39 corridor. This corridor is the only main egress route for the community of Mackenzie, BC. The target treatment areas align with the recently updated District of Mackenzie Community Wildfire Protection Plan. Activities include planning and prescription development, harvesting, understory pruning and thinning, and forest floor fuel piling and burning.If feasible, the residual waste fibre resulting from the treatment will be utilized by secondary fibre users in Mackenzie. Mackenzie
Wildfire Risk Reduction Planning and Prescriptions near Vanderhoof, BC SERNbc Wildfire Risk Reduction This project focused on the development of a restoration plan and treatment prescriptions for areas impacted by a wildfire near Vanderhoof BC.The goal was to identify treatments that would promote ecosystem function, stability, and resilience in an area heavily impacted by wildfire. Vanderhoof
Pilot Mountain Communication TowerWildfire Risk Reduction Plan Erafor Forestry Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project supported the development of a fuel management prescription to reduce wildfire risk to protect critical emergency communications infrastructure located on Pilot Mountain, northwest of Prince George, B.C. Prince George
PG Woodlot Assoc - Wildfire Threat Mitigation Prince George Woodlot Association Wildfire Risk Reduction This project involved wildfire threat mapping, the development of fuel management prescriptions, and assessment of potential fibre utilization associated with the future treatment areas.Activities were coordinated by the Prince George Woodlot Association. Prince George, Various
Residual Fibre Utilization for Pellets Burns Lake Incremental Haul Program
Project Title Project Proponent Society Purpose Full Proposal Description Closest Community
Skeena Region
Biomass from Thinning Overdense Stands Skeena Sawmills Ltd. Forest Carbon Skeena Sawmills is undertaking an economic feasibility study to evaluate whether residual waste leftover from thinning immature stands can be used as a biomass source in the form of pellets, with the goal of reducing carbon emissions by avoiding the use of coal to generate energy. The harvesting activity of pre-thinning densely forested areas will also result in increased long-term forest health and productivity, leading to additional carbon sequestration (storage) benefits. Thinning of stands will accelerate the development of old-growth forest characteristics by encouraging the growth of larger diameter trees and result in improved wildlife habitat. Terrace
Multiple Seedlots to Increase Carbon Sequestration Bulkley Valley Research Centre, FLNRORD - Forest Improvement and Research Management Forest Carbon Research using FLNRORD's tree growth modeling program Tree and Stand Simulator (TASS) to examine the ability of tree seeds from different climatic origins (that possess varying climatic and pest tolerances) to naturally buffer against climate extremes and pest damage. Smithers
Pinnacle Smithers Incremental Haul Program Pinnacle Renewable Energy Inc. Forest Carbon This project enables the recovery of marginal fibre not economical to haul long distance. Recovered fibre will be utilized by Pinnacle Renewable Energy's pellet facility in Smithers, BC instead of being burned. The project results in the recovery of approximately 100,000 cubic metres of residual fibre from Bulkley Timber Supply Area. Smithers
Seaton Forest Products Dry Fibre Utilization Seaton Forest Products Ltd. Forest Carbon The goal of this project is to utilize waste wood, primarily dry balsam, some pine, and spruce, that cannot be used by traditional mills and is normally left in the bush or burned. This project will help with costs beyond Seaton Forest Products Ltd.’s economic limit, allowing increased fibre utilization and reduction of carbon emissions from burning. Seaton Forest Products, located 9 km west of Witset First Nation and on Wet'suwet'en traditional territory, is also able to provide up to 22 local jobs, employing up to 15 workers from surrounding indigenous communities. The project facilitates the utilization of approximately 289,000 cubic metres of residual fibre from Bulkley Timber Supply Area. Seaton Forest Products produces cants (large dimension squared-off logs to be further processed into smaller dimensional lumber) out of logs which are not used in local mills. The cants are shipped to China where there’s a strong market for this type of Canadian product. Smithers
Terrace Community Forest Silviculture Strategy Treatments Terrace Community Forest LLP Forest Carbon This project aims to thin young stands within the Terrace Community Forest (TCF) tenure and rehabilitate low-value forests, enhance wildlife habitat, and increase the opportunity to recover wood fibre for other uses--such as pellet production. The information learned from this project is being shared to benefit other forested areas of the Coast Mountains Resource District. Without some form of silviculture treatment, the area would be left with its current composition resulting in delayed availability of trees for harvest and increased amount of underutilized fibre. Without treatment, the Community Forest’s allowable annual cut volume is reduced which lowers overall financial benefits for the community through revenue generation. Terrace
Grinding Residual Fibre for Pellet Plant Terrace Community Forest LLP Forest Carbon Terrace Community Forest has several piles of residual fibre from earlier harvesting that were slated to be burned. The piles have been curing for over two years to reduce moisture content for easier burning. With the recent opening of Skeena BioEnergy's pellet plant the fibre can now be ground and transported to the pellet plant. This project augmented the additional costs associated with transporting the residual fibre to pellet facilities and results in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding the burning of the material which was otherwise uneconomical to transport. Terrace
Skeena BioEnergy Forest Carbon This project facilitates the utilization of approximately 22,000 cubic metres of residual fibre from the Kalum and Kispiox Timber Supply Areas which would otherwise be burned. The slash piles will be utilized by Skeena BioEnergy’s new pellet facility in Terrace. The resulting pellets are used around the world to produce green energy, which often displaces fossil fuels, potentially reducing overall carbon emissions. Terrace
Francois Lake Carbon Emission Reduction Pinnacle Renewable Energy Inc. Forest Carbon The goal of this project is to recover residual fibre from the south side of Francois Lake for utilization by Pinnacle Renewable Energy as pellets. This activity will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding the burning of this fibre which isn't otherwise economical to transport on its own. Burns Lake
Northwest BC Residual Fibre Utilization Coast Tsimshian Resources LP Forest Carbon This project will be delivered through a collaborated effort between Coast Tsimshian Resources and Skeena Sawmills, with the additional support of Harmac Pacific. The goal is to increase fibre utilization and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by utilizing residual fibre in northwest British Columbia that's currently not economically feasible to remove from the harvest area and would normally be left for burning. The project facilitates access to stands where it would otherwise be uneconomic to remove pulp logs but where removing the fibre will stimulate healthy forest growth. Once removed, the residual fibre will be transferred for chipping, providing a chip supply to the coastal pulp industry. Any remaining biomass will be pelletized for use as green energy. Terrace
Incremental Haul Pilot Project Pinnacle Renewable Energy Inc. Fibre Recovery This project facilitated the recovery and utilization of residual fibre by piloting various sorting and hauling opportunities. The pilot will be evaluated by Forest Product Innovations Ltd. and will guide future incremental hauling opportunities. The fibre is otherwise uneconomic to transport from logged areas and would have been left on site and burned. This funding facilitated the transportation to Pinnacle's pellet manufacturing facilities. The program expanded significantly after the completion of this successful pilot. Burns Lake
Pinnacle Renewable Energy Inc. Fibre Recovery The goal of this project is to recover approximately 65,000 cubic metres of residual fibre for utilization at Pinnacle Renewable Energy in Burns Lake, BC. This will significantly reduce fibre left on site to be slash burned during standard post-harvest operations. The result of this activity is an overall reduction in greenhouse gas emission by avoiding burning activity. Burns Lake
Coast Mountains Fibre Utilization Westland Resources Limited Fibre Recovery Utilization of uneconomic pulp logs to be delivered to Harmac Pacific near Nanaimo from two licences in the Terrace area held by First Nations companies (Kitselas First Nation and Kitsumkalum Galts'ap Community) and Skeena Sawmills TFL 41. The Coast Mountains Fibre Utilization Project aims to increase fibre utilization and reduce CO emissions by the extraction and utilization of decadent pulp fibre. This fibre is beyond the current economic circle and would otherwise be left to waste and burnt in slash piles. The project will be a collaborative effort on the part of licencees in the Coast Mountains Natural Resource District (Kalum Ventures Limited, Kitselas Forestry Limited Partnership and Skeena Sawmills), with the additional support of a key pulp producer on the BC Coast (Harmac Pacific). This collaboration will ensure the efficient and economic delivery of the project from harvest to final product. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Terrace
Increased Fibre Utilization in Kispiox TSA NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. Fibre Recovery Utilization of residual waste fibre that would otherwise be burnt in the Kispiox Timber Supply Area (Hazelton) will instead be used by coastal pulp mills. Since the closure of the last local pulp mill in the early 2000s, forestry in Northwest B.C. has been a very difficult business. A combination of high operating costs and low value fibre means that, in order to sustain a viable business, they often have to make the difficult decision of leaving the pulp on the block to be burned. Leaving the pulp is, in many cases, the only solution as there is not enough profit made from the sawlog portion of the profile to justify the incremental costs of skidding, processing, loading, and hauling pulp (along with the increased road maintenance costs). This is especially difficult within the Kipsiox TSA, where there are minimal processing facilities and a timber profile that is dominated by low value hemlock. This project will help to avoid pile burning so there will be fewer greenhouse gas emissions. This will contribute to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Hazelton
Pinnacle Intake 7 Proposal Pinnacle Renewable Energy Inc. Fibre Recovery Utilization of waste wood by the Pinnacle Smithers pellet plant. The project extends the distance of the recovery of residual waste fibre and allows this fibre to be utilized instead of burnt. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Smithers
Skeena Region Whitebark Pine Seed Collection Bulkley Valley Research Centre Stand Rehabilitation Whitebark pine is an important, and endangered, component of diverse and resilient higher elevation forests in inland portions of the southern Skeena Region. Whitebark pine is important for wildlife and considered a keystone species because it's often the first to establish on disturbed sites and enables the growth of other tree species. There's a shortage of registered seeds collected from parent trees showing resistance to the deadly white pine blister rust. This project focused on taking advantage of a good seed crop, which occur once every 10 years or so in Skeena Region, and involved region-wide seed collection. FESBC funding was used to collect seeds to be used for plantings on disturbed higher elevation sites where the primary goal is site rehabilitation and carbon storage. Various
Silviculture Strategy for Terrace Community Forest Terrace Community Forest Stand Rehabilitation This project included the development of a silviculture strategy for the Terrace Community Forest to identify stands marginal or uneconomical stands that could benefit from a silviculture treatment. These stands may be spaced, pre-commercial thinned, replanted or have other treatments that improve their growth and vigour. Terrace
Exploring Ideas to Increase Marginal Sawlog Utilization in Bulkley TSA BCTS Babine Stand Rehabilitation BC Timber Sales, in partnership with local forest licensees, wishes to develop procedures to increase the utilization of marginal fibre, primarily in balsam stands in the Bulkley timber supply area. A report indicated that increased valuation of forest carbon could result in benefits for both utilization as well as climate change mitigation. Smithers
Terrace Spacing of 2nd Growth Stands - Project 1 FLNRORD, Coast Mountains Stand Rehabilitation The goal of this project was to thin overly dense hemlock and amabilis fir stands to facilitate healthier and faster tree growth. These stands had densities of over 5,000 stems per hectare (sph), which limits the ability of trees to grow, yielding many small and variable diameter logs unsuitable for sawlogs. By spacing these stands down to 800-1000 sph, trees grow larger in height and diameter, reaching target sawlog dimensions 30 years sooner than unspaced stands. The overall total stand volume growth rates are maintained, resulting in the improvement of low-value stands to high-value stands suitable for sawlogs. Terrace
Terrace Spacing of 2nd Growth Stands - Project 2 FLNRORD, Coast Mountains Stand Rehabilitation The goal of this project was to thin overly dense hemlock and amabilis fir stands to facilitate healthier and faster tree growth. These stands had densities of over 5,000 stems per hectare (sph), which limits the ability of trees to grow, yielding many small and variable diameter logs unsuitable for sawlogs. By spacing these stands down to 800-1000 sph, trees grow larger in height and diameter, reaching target sawlog dimensions 30 years sooner than unspaced stands. The overall total stand volume growth rates are maintained, resulting in the improvement of low-value stands to high-value stands suitable for sawlogs. Terrace
Cheslatta Carrier Nation Fire Damage Stand Rehabilitation Cheslatta Carrier Nation Stand Rehabilitation The primary purpose of this project is to salvage wood and rehabilitate stands moderately and heavily damaged in the 2018 wildfires. Cheslatta Carrier Nation (CCN) has a positive and proven history in the forest industry and the Nation depends on the forests to provide not only for their cultural well-being but for an array of financial opportunities. To grow their forestry division, CCN undertook development on their forestry tenures and made a significant investment in harvesting equipment with the intention of using the volume from these tenures to maintain their forest operations. Logging had just begun in these areas when wildfire burned much of the area in the summer of 2018, resulting is a substantial loss of revenue. CCN sought funding from FESBC to rehabilitate the fire-damaged stands and mitigate some of the financial loss experienced in 2018 by providing an opportunity to use the equipment and employ those who were left without work after the fires. The total project area, including heavily-damaged stands, will see trees removed from about 100 hectares of fire-damaged area. These areas will then be rehabilitated. Burns Lake
Cheslatta Carrier Nation - Heavy Fire Damage Stand Rehabilitation Cheslatta Carrier Nation Stand Rehabilitation The primary purpose of this project is to salvage wood and rehabilitate stands heavily damaged in the 2018 wildfires. Cheslatta Carrier Nation (CCN) has a positive and proven history in the forest industry and the Nation depends on the forests to provide not only for their cultural wellbeing but for an array of financial opportunities. To grow their forestry division, CCN undertook development on their forestry tenures and made a significant investment in harvesting equipment with the intention of using the volume from these tenures to maintain their forest operations. Logging had just begun in these areas when wildfire burned much of the area in the summer of 2018, resulting is a substantial loss of revenue. CCN sought funding from FESBC to rehabilitate the fire-damaged stands and mitigate some of the financial loss experienced in 2018 by providing an opportunity to use the equipment and employ those who were left without work after the fires. The total project area, in combination with moderately-damaged stands, will see trees removed from about 400 hectares of fire-damaged area. These areas will then be rehabilitated. Burns Lake
Whitebark Pine Seed Collection and Planting SERNbc Stand Rehabilitation This project involves the management of the whitebark pine restoration program including seed collection and planting of 6500 disease-resistant whitebark pine trees. Whitebark pine provides important habitat and food for wildlife. Various
Boer Mountain Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Burns Lake Community Forest Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction The project area of about 155 hectares is home to the Burns Lake Mountain Bike Park and Trails and a small campground. The area is heavily used by recreational hikers and is known as a world-class mountain biking destination. As such, the area is managed to maintain the enjoyment and safety of these recreational activities. The area was heavily impacted by mountain pine beetle and the deadfall and fuel loading had become a considerable hazard. The adjacent forests also had a high level of fuel loading and the entire area is subject to trees falling over from dead and rotting beetle-attacked pine. The goal of this project was to reduce fuel loading and wildfire risk while maintaining recreational values. Burns Lake
Granisle Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Babine Lake Community Forest Society Wildfire Risk Reduction Babine Lake Community Forest (BLCF) is held in equal partnership between Lake Babine Nation and the Village of Granisle. Together they are mitigating wildfire risk and creating a protection zone around the village by planting a buffer of deciduous trees. Previous community wildfire protection plans recommended treatments around the perimeter of the Village located inside the BLCF boundary. This plan meets the Village’s goal of reducing the wildfire hazard associated with the mature conifer stands close to the community and creating a long-term wildfire hazard mitigation solution in establishing a protection zone around the Village. Planting the area with deciduous trees, like birch, will result in stands less susceptible to extreme wildfire behaviour and allow for forest and economic diversification. Granisle
District of Houston Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments District of Houston Wildfire Risk Reduction The 2018 District of Houston Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) identified where wilfire risk reduction treatments may be required - over 1,000 hectares. The goal of this project is to conduct fuel modification treatments on approximately 1,000 hectares to mitigate hazard from fires adjacent to, or coming from the southwest of the community, as it was identified in the CWPP that prevailing winds and probable fire threat will be from this direction. Long-term objectives are to convert this stand to a more dominant deciduous stand, which will be more resistant to wildfire. Additional goals are to reduce fuel loading, reduce surface fuels left by harvesting activities, and to ensure safe access into this area for future fire suppression activities. Houston
Nadina Burns Lake Community Forest Fire Break Burns Lake Community Forest Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction The focus of the project is to reduce wildfire risk to the largest industrial complexes in the Lakes District, an area dominated by pine stands attacked by the mountain pine beetle. The project will result in creation of a fire break between 50-200 metres in width. All conifers will be removed from the fire break zone and in some areas dead pine will be removed to enhanceme wildlife habitat. All of the wildfire risk reduction treatments funded for this project was for the portion of works completed over and above the normal harvesting activities. This project could not have been completed without coordinating the treatments with normal harvest operations. Burns Lake
Wetzin'kwa Community Forest Strategic Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Wetzin'kwa Community Forest Corporation Wildfire Risk Reduction The Wetzin’kwa Community Forest (WCF) is in close proximity to the Town of Smithers and Village of Telkwa, and has been impacted by mountain pine beetle. The beetle-killed pine has created variable levels of dry fuel hazard, both in mature stands and in recent salvage logging blocks. With the right conditions, a fire could result and put community values and property at risk. Potential high-hazard areas were identified based on available inventory information and field data collection was conducted in various stand types to allow for an analysis of the level of fuel loads and subsequent recommended potential treatments to reduce wildfire threat. This project created a Strategic Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan (SWHMP) that will be used to guide the identification and prioritization of treatment areas that pose significant wildfire risk due to the composition, distribution, and/or continuity between forest fuels. The SWHMP is intended to guide the development, implementation, and maintenance of fuel management prescriptions as well as the development of alternative forest management practices promoting fire resiliency. Smithers
Project Title Project Proponent Society Purpose Full Proposal Description Closest Community
South Coast Region
Boston Bar Fibre Recovery Interwest Timber Ltd. Fibre Recovery Utilization of waste wood that is otherwise uneconomical. Pulp fibre will be sent to a Chips Ahoy plant for chipping and future delivery to coastal pulp mills. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Boston Bar
Post Wildfire OGMA Rehabilitation FLNRORD-Coast Research Stand Rehabilitation This project involved experimental treatments to accelerate the development of old growth structure, carbon sequestration capacity, and resiliency to fire in moderately to severely burned Old Growth Management Areas. The first treatment was based on current tree regeneration standards; the second will use provincial climate change informed species selection (CCISS) tools. Pemberton
Access Corridor Fuel Reduction Implementation FLNRORD - Sea to Sky District Wildfire Risk Reduction Sqomish was selected to plan and deliver treatments along the Blackwater Forest Service Road on the coastal interior transition of the Sea to Sky District and reflected a high priority for the Ministry. The treatments were very difficult and costly to undertake given the terrain, wood types and complexity of a main road along a fish bearing stream. About half the area was completed with the available funding. The Birkenhead Lake Provincial Park at the end of the road is a high use park with only the Blackwater FSR as the access in and out. Making the road access safer for travel during a wildfire was one of the objectives of this project. D'Arcy
Whistler Fuel Reduction Cheakamus Community Forest Wildfire Risk Reduction The project runs along both sides of the Cheakamus Lake Forest Service Road which serves as the main access point into Cheakamus Lake and Garibaldi Provincial Park. The project is co-funded by the Forest Enhancement Society of BC (FESBC), the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW), and all revenue generated from the sale of logs from the thinning are applied to reduce the cost of treatment. The goal of the project is to alter wildfire behavior by modifying forest densities and structure in this heavily used portion of the community forest to protect the south facing slopes of Whistler Mountain, the community of Whistler, and the western edge of Garibaldi Provincial Park. Whistler
Fuel Reduction Thinning 2019-2021 Cheakamus Community Forest Wildfire Risk Reduction The project runs along both sides of the Cheakamus Lake Forest Service Road which serves as the main access point into Cheakamus Lake and Garibaldi Provincial Park. The project is co-funded by the Forest Enhancement Society of BC (FESBC), the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW), and all revenue generated from the sale of logs from the thinning are applied to reduce the cost of treatment. The goal of the project is to alter wildfire behavior by modifying forest densities and structure in this heavily used portion of the community forest to protect the south facing slopes of Whistler Mountain, the community of Whistler, and the western edge of Garibaldi Provincial Park. Whistler
Planning, Prescriptions, and Layout-Fuel Reduction Cheakamus Community Forest Wildfire Risk Reduction This project continues work on the Whistler area wildfire fuel break and involves the removal of trees and surface and ladder fuels with delivery of the vegetation to a composting site. The priority areas are along the single lane forest service road in and out of Cheakamus Lake and Garabaldi Provincial Park. This project leads to further projects to complete the entire road system and promote a safer egress route in the case of wildfire. Whistler
S2S District Access Fuel Treatments B.A. Blackwell & Associates Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project involved planning for wildfire fuel management treatments to improve community, recreation, and infrastructure access and escape route corridors. The project is consistent with the Community Wildfire Protection Plan and initial focus will be for road access to high use areas that have a single egress route in and out. The prescriptions will lead to future projects for treatments. D'Arcy, Whistler
Project Title Project Proponent Society Purpose Full Proposal Description Closest Community
Thompson Okanagan Region
Fertilization TFL 59 Weyerhaeuser Company Limited Forest Carbon The goal of this project was to advance the environmental and resource stewardship of BC forests through the fertilization of managed stands of Lodgepole pine, spruce and Douglas-fir on Crown land. Benefits of fertilizing included accelerated growth and yield of timber volume and improved management of greenhouse gases by creating increased capacity for carbon storage in the growing forest. Habitat was enhanced for overwintering ungulates such deer, elk and moose. Fertilization increased the size and development of tree crowns which increased the habitat available for other species and decreased the snow depth on the forest floor. Oliver
Assessment of Carbon Levels in Forest Soils FLNRORD - Operations Forest Carbon This research project focused on collection and analysis of data to establish a baseline of existing forest soil carbon levels. Data was be used to evaluate treatment options aimed at mitigating the loss of soil carbon and increasing carbon stored within forest soils. The information will contribute towards management decisions and initiatives, especially those aimed at mitigating climate change through land management strategies. Kamloops
Biomass Utilization Ledcor Forest Products Partnership Forest Carbon This project aims to reduce pile burning while also increasing the utilization of the residual fibre in the forest by increasing the availability/accessibility of this uneconomic fibre. The project is focused on accessing and utilizing roadside debris piles currently scheduled for burning and then processing the fibre for market as either biomass or hog fuel. These activities also reduce wildfire risk by decreasing fuel loading in the bush and in and around communities. Various
Recovery and Utilization of Residual Fibre Westwood Fibre Resources Ltd. Forest Carbon Through this project, about 325,000 cubic metres of normally unmerchantable wood fibre will be saved from burning in slash piles over the next four years. Much of the forest fibre being recovered includes the tops generated by Weyerhaeuser’s primary harvesting in the Merritt and Okanagan timber supply areas. When a tree is cut up into logs, the tree top is typically discarded as waste and then burned to comply with legal requirements. The goal of this initiative is to recover the tops and convert them into chips for pulp or for use as other secondary products such as fence posts, which will then be marketed in the BC southern interior and coast. Hauling is the largest variable cost, meaning that recovering low-grade fibre, like small diameter treetops, from remote locations is commonly uneconomical. FESBC is augmenting the extra hauling costs over and above the break-even points to facilitate the utilization of fibre that would otherwise be burned. Various
Hemlock Fibre Recovery/Incremental Haul - North Thompson and North Adams Lake Arrow Transportation Systems Inc. Forest Carbon These projects allow for fibre recovery and enhanced utilization of primarily hemlock low-grade pulp logs. The location of the fibre is beyond the economic haul radius, therefore the recovery of the fibre is normally not affordable. FESBC funding supports the transportation of fibre from outside of the normal haul radius which facilitates fibre utilization and avoids open burning of the logging slash piles. This also results in an opportunity to reduce carbon emissions through avoiding burning which creates an immediate release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Kamloops
Fibre Recovery/Incremental Haul - North Thompson and North Adams Lake Arrow Transportation Systems Inc. Forest Carbon These projects allow for fibre recovery and enhanced utilization of primarily hemlock low-grade pulp logs. The location of the fibre is beyond the economic haul radius, therefore the recovery of the fibre is normally not affordable. FESBC funding supports the transportation of fibre from outside of the normal haul radius which facilitates fibre utilization and avoids open burning of the logging slash piles. This also results in an opportunity to reduce carbon emissions through avoiding burning which creates an immediate release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Kamloops
Pulp Purchases Outside of Economical Cycle Ledcor Forest Products Partnership Forest Carbon The goal of this project is to recover pulp logs currently being left behind to burn as it is uneconomical to utilize them. Once at Ledcor's Chilliwack mill, the fibre can be utilized, leading to enhanced fibre recovery and reducing pile burning, which results in the overall reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Merritt, Princeton
Use of a Slash Bundler for Biomass Recovery Valley Carriers Ltd. Forest Carbon This project includes an operational trial of the use of a slash bundler to compress residual fibre left over from harvesting activity into a 16-foot long bundle of "logs". Bundling the logging residuals into log form enables the use of traditional three-bunk short log trucks, which are designed for bush hauling. The bundled fibre is then brought to a central location for grinding. This approach enables more efficient grinding while providing more work to qualified log truck drivers and reducing the risk and equipment damage when accessing the logging residual fibre. Bundling will increase the utilization of the remaining fibre after harvesting is complete and the ground fibre produced will be utilized by a local bioenergy plant. Merritt
Recovery and Utilization of Residual Fibre in the Lillooet Area Arrow Transportation Systems Inc. Forest Carbon This project aims to recover up to 100,000 cubic metres of residual fibre from the Lillooet Timber Supply Area that has traditionally been left on site and burned. Augmenting the transportation of uneconomic fibre increases overall fibre utilization at the Domtar Pulp mill in Kamloops, B.C. where the material will be used to make various products including fibre reinforced siding, moldings, paper, and green electricity. Recovery of this fibre results in an overall reduction of greenhouse gas emissions through the avoidance of burning and creates additional economic opportunities. Lillooet
Forest Fertilization - Lower North Thompson Community Forest Lower North Thompson Community Forest Society Forest Carbon This project focused on the fertilization of stands within the Lower North Thompson Community Forest to maintain or improve their health, rate of growth, and overall resiliency. The increased tree growth will result in greater carbon sequestration (storage), more timber supply, jobs, and government stumpage revenue in the future. Barriere
Rehabilitation of Legacy Roads Lower North Thompson Community Forest Society Forest Carbon The goal of this project was to complete field work to assess the impact of existing forests roads on streams, creeks, and the water table in the Lower North Thompson Community Forest. In areas where a need for rehabilitation was identified, the funding supported the development of prescriptions to restore the hydrological function. Barriere
16 Year Re-measurement of Spacing and Fertilization Treatments Weyerhaeuser Company Limited Forest Carbon This project involved the reassessment of spacing and fertilization trials established in the Cascades Natural Resource District in 2001. The measurement of the tree growth and subsequent analysis of the data provides information on the growth response of the spaced and fertilized stands. This analysis provides valuable insight into the development of best practices for different spacing densities and fertilization regimes. Ultimately, the project provides the foundation to grow trees faster, which sequesters carbon faster and increases future timber supply. Princeton
TFL59 Fertilization Weyerhaeuser Company Limited Forest Carbon This project will be to set up future fertilization work. The goal of this project is to take foliage samples to enable areas to be selected for forest fertilization. The project also includes prescriptions and contract tendering for fertilizer application. Oliver
Logan Lake Community Forest - Fibre Utilization Logan Lake Community Forest Corporation Forest Carbon Through this project the Logan Lake Community Forest aims to implement a more comprehensive fibre utilization program by recovering residual fibre left over from harvest operations. Relocating residual fibre to centralized areas enables cost-effective grinding and recovery of the waste fibre for use as hog fuel, which avoids pile burning. This will result in an overall reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and the reduction of wildfire fuel loading in the Logan Lake Community Forest. Logan Lake
Domtar Bush Grinding Project Domtar Forest Carbon This project enables low-grade biomass fibre (low value logs, branches and bark) that would otherwise be burned in the forest to be utilized through grinding the fibre and transporting it to the Domtar pulp mill in Kamloops. The biomass is then combusted at a high temperature to create green electricity. Most of the electricity will be used by Domtar and any surplus is sold to BC Hydro. This project results in reduced greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding the burning of slash piles and through the production of green electricity from woody biomass which potentially displaces electricity that otherwise might have been made from fossil fuels. Kamloops
Lavington Okanagan Fibre Utilization Project Pinnacle Renewable Energy Inc. Forest Carbon This project entails transporting uneconomic residual waste wood to a pellet plant and a power plant to avoid pile burning emissions and improve fibre utilization. Most of the residual uneconomic fibre is the result of regular commercial forest harvesting in the Okanagan area. A new approach to producing "bio-logs" is increasing the amount of fibre that is recoverable during the timber harvesting operation. Recovering these "bio-logs" concurrently with a primary timber harvesting operation creates efficiencies and lowers the delivered cost of the fibre to facilities such as Pinnacle Pellet Lavington. In the Okanagan area, many of the timber harvesting sites are on steep and narrow forestry roads, which makes bush grinding very challenging and often impossible. This new method of creating a bio-log sort enables the fibre to be transported on regular logging trucks and unloaded using conventional equipment in mill log yards. Vernon
Fibre Recovery/Incremental Haul - Adams Lake Arrow Transportation Systems Inc. Fibre Recovery This project facilitated the recovery and utilization of residual fibre. This fibre was otherwise uneconomic to transport from logged areas and would have been left on site and burned. This funding facilitated the transportation of the fibre to the Domtar Pulp Mill in Kamloops and contributed to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions as on-site burning releases carbon and methane into the atmosphere. The residual fibre was obtained through business to business agreements with other forest companies and in most cases was concurrently delivered to River City. River City is a facility operated by Arrow which is adjacent to Domtar's pulp mill in Kamloops. Wood was chipped for use in the Domtar mill. Kamloops
Roadside Debris Grinding Ledcor Forest Products Partnership Fibre Recovery This project facilitated the recovery and utilization of residual fibre by piloting various sorting, grinding and hauling opportunities. The pilot will be evaluated by Forest Product Innovations Ltd. and will guide future incremental hauling opportunities. The fibre is otherwise uneconomic to transport from logged areas and would have been left on site and burned. This funding facilitated the transportation to various secondary manufacturing facilities both in the Kamloops area as well as on the BC Coast. The program expanded significantly after the completion of this successful pilot. Kamloops
Converting Forest Biomass Tk'emlupsemc Forestry Development Corp. Fibre Recovery The purpose of this project is to take logging slash that is typically burnt on site and to bring it to a center to convert the woody biomass into a growth medium for the purpose of reclaiming disturbed sites with a nutrient rich, sterile product that expedites plant growth and soil stabilization. The woody biomass will need to be ground or chipped to facilitate expedited decomposition through a process that creates a highly organic mulch that is very similar to peat moss in texture. This growth medium will stabilize soils and assist the germination of trees, shrubs or grasses, while enhancing the productivity of a site. Kamloops
Biomass Logs/Bush Grinding Arrow Transportation Systems Inc. Fibre Recovery Transporting uneconomic fibre to a variety of secondary fibre users in the Southern Interior to avoid pile burning emissions and improve fibre utilization. Most of the fibre will be ground or utilized as biologs. The project will enable fibre that would typically be burnt in slash piles to be moved in the form of biologs to a central location for grinding and/or bush grinding. The end product fibre would be moved to the Domtar pulp mill for energy and pulp production. A percentage of biologs will be chipped at the River City chipper for use at the Domtar Pulp Mill for pulp production. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Kamloops
BCTS Tops Proposal Westwood Fibre Resources Ltd. Fibre Recovery Utilization of residual waste fibre by the BC EcoChips facility for distribution to other secondary fibre users in the Southern Interior. This project helps to avoid pile burning emissions and improves fibre utilization from eligible Timber Sale Licenses outside the current economic reach. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Princeton
Slash Grinding Valley Carriers Ltd. Fibre Recovery This project is to grind forest waste residuals left post harvest. The grinding enables utilization of the residual fibre instead of burning it. The fibre will be delivered to Merritt Green Energy and/or Domtar. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. The biomass is used to make green electricity, which can displace electricity that may have been generated by fossil fuels in other jurisdictions. Merritt
Garnet Valley Enhancement Penticton Indian Band Habitat Enhancement This project was phase one of a two part project to re-establish ecological diversity, resiliency, and ungulate habitat using prescribed fire equivalent to the natural fire regime. This project was collaborative and used local indigenous knowledge and science. Additionally, hand treatments and spot burning were used to reduce overall wildfire risk. Slashing and a black line perimeter burn is to be completed. Piles of slash were burnt with other funding sources for the prescribed burn. Outcomes were a thinned stand which enhanced mule deer habitat. Summerland
Garnet Valley Ungulate Winter Range Enhancement Penticton Indian Band Habitat Enhancement Phase two of a two part project that was to re-establish ecological diversity, resiliency, and ungulate habitat using prescribed fire equivalent to the natural fire regime. This project was collaborative and used local indigenous knowledge and science. Additionally, hand treatments and spot burning were used to reduce overall wildfire risk. This Pilot project led to a Memorandum of Understanding with the Ministry and Penticton Indian Band. By jointly planning with BC wildlife biologists, the project incorporated First Nation cultural values in a stand level ecosystem restoration prescription and treatment. Slashing and a black line perimeter burn were completed. The outcome was a thinned stand for mule deer habitat. Summerland
Hat Creek Piling and Burning Bonaparte Indian Band Habitat Enhancement The goal of this project is to remove trees, and pile and burn debris to enhance critical deer winter range, increase forage for wildlife and grazing for livestock, and improve the opportunity for mid-term timber harvesting in the Hat Creek area. Cache Creek
Trepanier Wildfire Rehabilitation Ntityix Resources LP Stand Rehabilitation In 2011 a wildfire burned a large portion Trepanier Creek, west of Peachland. The area is home to a popular hiking trail known as the Trepanier Greenway, much of which falls within Westbank First Nation’s Community Forest. The goal of this project was to rehabilitate the burned area, making it safe for tree planters and recreationists by removing danger snags, and to then restock the area denuded by the wildfire with a mixture of Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine. Trees were replanted at a lower interface density to eventually restore a forest on the burned area as natural regeneration on the burned area has been sparse. Planting the area will also facilitate earlier carbon sequestering than if left for natural regeneration. Tree planting will also result in improved winter range for mule deer. Westbank
Skeetchestn Forest and Riparian Restoration Brinkman & Associates Reforestation Ltd. Stand Rehabilitation The Deadman River watershed has been impacted by a combination of extensive forest fires (including the Elephant Hill fire in 2017), past timber harvest and cattle grazing practices, and mountain pine beetle (MPB). These combined impacts have reduced timber production and degraded high priority steelhead and Thompson Coho habitat, as well as exacerbating drought and fire risks. The Skeetchestn Traditional Territory Forest and Riparian Restoration Project supports the planning and implementation of landscape-scale restoration covering in the Deadman River watershed. Project goals include restoring riparian forest structure and habitat and increasing ecosystem carbon density. The project is designed to serve as a model for integrated riparian planning and restoration in other critical drainages. Kamloops
West Kelowna Wildfires Rehabilitation Project - 20 Ntityix Resources LP Stand Rehabilitation Between 2009-2014, three wildfires occurred near West Kelowna and within Westbank first Nation’s Community Forest. This multi-phase project aimed to assess the three fire-damaged areas with to goal of developing treatment plans to promote rehabilitation. Activities included hazard tree removal in recreation areas, improving visual quality and forest production by planting trees, and restoring mule deer winter range. Westbank
Cedar Hills Fire Rehabilitation & Deer Winter Range Improvement Tolko Industries Ltd. Stand Rehabilitation Cedar Hills is a large area 8 kilometers east of the community of Falkland on Highway 97C and was burned by a wildfire 14 years ago and was the focus of a local Natural Resource District staff and Tolko Industries Ltd. project funded by the Forest Enhancement Society of BC (FESBC) for both forest rehabilitation and to improve the area for Mule deer winter range. Difficult growing conditions, including drought, existed for some of the remaining area and previous attempts to reforest for timber productivity had been largely unsuccessful. Extensive planning included consultation with wildlife specialists and First Nations followed by the development of detailed prescriptions for reforestation and habitat improvement objectives. Winter wildlife surveys were completed and concluded the area held significant importance as winter range for Mule deer. Tolko foresters developed silviculture prescriptions, obtained seed for sowing, grew seedlings in nurseries, and planted 1400 stems per ha in clumpy densities the spring of 2019. It is anticipated that seedling survival will be low but the suviving trees will more rapidly rehabilitate the burn and provide more and more shade with each growing season. Falkland
TFL 49 MPB Pine Stand Rehabilitation Phase 1 Tolko Industries Ltd Stand Rehabilitation This project was a partnership with BC Timber Sales and Forests for Tomorrow to remove damaged, mountain pine beetle-killed pine stands and to reforest them so that they can return to productivity and also to lower the wildfire risk in the Tree Farm License. Tolko, with FES funding, undertook the planning and development work including prescriptions and engineering submissions into BCTS systems. BCTS will implement a timber sale and Forests for Tomorrow will undertake the reforestation. Falkland, Vernon
Cascades District Mountain Pine Beetle Rehabilitation Forsite Consultants Ltd. Stand Rehabilitation This project focused on development of an overview plan to identify priority wildfire risk reduction areas in the Cascades Forest District.Specific treatment prescriptions were developed to facilitate treatment on a few small priority areas with the goal of restoring forest productivity of mountain pine beetle killed stands. The results were accelerated recovery healthy ecosystem functions and improved timber supply for future generations of British Columbians. Merritt
Thompson Rivers Resource District Mountain Pine Beetle Rehabilitation Forsite Consultants Ltd. Stand Rehabilitation The goal of this project is to identify treatment opportunities for uneconomic stands heavily impacted by mountain pine beetle in the Thompson Rivers District over the last decade to restore overall forest productivity. Kamloops
Overstory Removal - Mountain Pine Beetle Impacted Stands Rehabilitation Logan Lake Community Forest Corporation Stand Rehabilitation This planning project brought together First Nations, registered professional foresters, and other key stakeholders from the Logan Lake area to develop an implementation plan focusing on areas of highest fire risk to ensure future work is strategic and priority-based. The plan involved many steps including a risk assessment to develop management strategies in response to risks identified. The final report highlighted the areas of most significant risk to wildfire and work has begun to mitigate the risk to the community forest. The planning work resulted in the identification of a range of wildfire risks and values across the landscape. The findings revealed key areas of higher wildfire risk, including corridors of human presence and development surrounding Logan Lake and along the Coquihalla Corridor. High value areas were identified based on concentrations of homes, businesses, schools, civic water, power, emergency evacuation routes, communications and such, as well as wildlife habitat, timber, recreation and important environmental attributes. Logan Lake
Syilx Stewardship in Fire Maintained Landscapes Okanagan Nation Alliance Wildfire Risk Reduction This is a collaborative project where local First Nations, industry, the Provincial government, and the Forest Enhancement Society of BC (FESBC) worked together to develop solutions to benefit and protect citizens, wildlife habitat, ecosystem functioning, and cultural values of the land. Historically, the Syilx Territory and the Thompson-Okanagan Region have been maintained by fire events, but active fire suppression tactics led to vegetation ingrowth and extreme fuel loading throughout Syilx Territory, which is about 69,000 square kilometres. Combined with climate change, fire suppression has led to longer, more intense, and more destructive wildfire seasons and a less resilient forest ecosystem. Thinning the forest to more natural semi-open state was the prescription agreed upon by all partners. One logging contractor did the timber harvesting and fuel reduction treatments creating a very efficient project. Most of the post-harvest biomass was utilized (instead of being slash burned), which helps BC and Canada meet climate change targets. Peachland
Southeast Kelowna Landscape Level Fuel Break FLNRORD, Okanagan Shuswap District Wildfire Risk Reduction The goal of this project is to thin out dense stands of pine and Douglas-fir trees and remove accumulations of dead wood that currently pose a significant fire hazard in a 1,000 hectare area near Myra-Bellevue Provincial Park near Kelowna. Treatment activities are applied in 15-hectare and 50-hectare blocks and includes thinning trees, trimming the lower branches to remove ladder fuels, and then removing that wood and other forest fuels from the ground. In the event of a future wildfire in the area, less flammable material would be available to burn and the risk of a catastrophic fire would be reduced. This work will also improve firefighter access to the area and make it easier and safer for them to fight a fire. Kelowna
Big White Interface Fuel Break Treatments Davies Wildfire Management Inc Wildfire Risk Reduction Close to 100 hectares at Big White Ski Resort were treated to minimize potential home, resort infrastructure and business loss due to wildfire, and ensure the resort’s continued contribution to the economy. The treatments will also help to protect part of the mountain’s only escape route. The areas will be harvested to create a visually pleasing, more open forested area that is unable to support intense fire behaviour. The treated area will also increase access and safety for any future fire suppression activities using recommendations from the 2010 Big White Resort Wildfire Protection Plan. Big White Ski Resort
Joe Rich Wildfire Threat Reduction Tolko Industries Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project involved planning, strategic harvesting and tree thinning to address wildfire threat and supression access inside the Joe Rich community wildland-urban interface. The project has the support of the broader community and also took into account mule deer winter range. Very complex planning was required to address government objectives. Modelling for wildfire threat and the use of state of the art LIDAR technology for prescribing the tree retention levels were also used to createthe wildfire protection plan. Small scale forest thinning using chainsaws in areas adjacent to private property, combined with a fire access trail and modified timber harvesting areas were used for this successful project. Kelowna
Agur Lake Fuel Management Prescriptions Agur Lake Camp Society Wildfire Risk Reduction This was the first phase of a project to reduce wildfire risk by decreasing overall fuel loading near the Agur Lake Camp Society, a camp dedicated to creating a barrier free wilderness experience. Key activities in high-risk areas included reducing surface and ladder fuels, decreasing crown density, thinning from the ground up to help ensure flames don't reach tree crowns, and retaining large-diameter trees of fire-resilient species. THE CHALLENGE: Agur Lake Camp, B.C.'s only fully accessible campground for people with disabilities, was in an area of high to extreme fire threat. THE OUTCOME: 85% of hazardous fuels were removed from over six hectares to protect campers and critical infrastructure. Summerland
Agur Lake Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatments Agur Lake Camp Society Wildfire Risk Reduction The overall goal of this project was to reduce wildfire risk by decreasing overall fuel loading near the Agur Lake Camp Society, a camp dedicated to creating a barrier free wilderness experience. Key activities in high-risk areas included reducing surface and ladder fuels, decreasing crown density, thinning from the ground up to help ensure flames don't reach tree crowns, and retaining large-diameter trees of fire-resilient species. THE CHALLENGE: Agur Lake Camp, B.C.'s only fully accessible campground for people with disabilities, was in an area of high to extreme fire threat. THE OUTCOME: 85% of hazardous fuels were removed from over six hectares to protect campers and critical infrastructure. Summerland
Sicamous Wildfire Risk Mitigation Silvatech Consulting Ltd Wildfire Risk Reduction This project will protect important infrastructure owned by the District of Sicamous (DOS) like its water reservoir and vital transportation corridors. The DOS will also realize another benefit from removing forest fuels in the treatment area because the project will create greater and safer access for citizens. Landmark, a local forestry consulting firm, is leading the technical work and has collaborated with BCTS to ensure planning of the fire fuel breaks are consistent with BCTS timber harvesting plans. The first area identified for priority treatment will be the community’s eastern boundary, an area with dense second growth Douglas-fir, larch, cedar, and hemlock stands that extend from mountain tops to valley bottoms. These forests are considered to be high-risk wildfire threats. The project will also enhance the utilization of forest fibre by chipping the debris and utilizing that biomass for heat and possibly power. The DOS is in the process of planning and designing a bioenergy system to utilize biomass produced by the work of the project. Sicamous
Xaxli'p Community Forest - Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Xaxli'p Community Forest Corp. Wildfire Risk Reduction The project is located in the Xaxli’p Community Forest in the Fountain Creek watershed near Fountain Lake BC, about 15 km north of Lillooet, BC. The project will result in a landscape-level shaded fuel break that connects existing fuel breaks. This shaded fuel break will improve the ability to control spread and compartmentalize fires in the area and improve timber values through thinning and pruning. Fibre removed through this activity will be recovered where possible in order to maximize fibre utilization. Lillooet
Silver Lake Camp - Wildfire Risk Reduction Treatment Ntityix Resources LP Wildfire Risk Reduction Silver Lake Camp is located within Westbank First Nation’s Community Forest, about 20 kilometres west of Peachland BC. The camp offers forestry-based educational opportunities for youth and community groups, hosting hundreds of youth every spring and summer for a semi-wilderness camping experience. The camp is surrounded by densely forested stands on three sides, including many areas with a high number of downed and/or dead trees. The goal of this project is to reduce wildfire risk to the camp and surrounding areas by reducing the number of downed and dead trees in the forested area adjacent to the camp. Peachland
FireSmart Treatments - Logan Lake Trails Area Logan Lake Community Forest Corporation Wildfire Risk Reduction This project is located northeast of the town of Logan Lake in the area of the Logan Lake Trails network. These trails represent both an important recreation and economic resource to the community as both locals and tourists utilize these trails year-round. In the event of a wildfire, the trails would be heavily impacted, which would diminish the economic and recreation benefits to the community of Logan Lake. The proposed area contains high fuel levels and is directly adjacent to residential developments. The purpose of this multi-year project is to reduce wildfire risk in the wildland urban interface through the development of fuel management prescriptions within preliminary planning areas and the implementation of fuel reduction treatments to prescribed standards. Logan Lake
FireSmart Treatments - Face Lake and Paska Lake Communities Logan Lake Community Forest Corporation Wildfire Risk Reduction The community of Face-Paska Lakes and the surrounding areas are located 15 km northeast of Logan Lake and has unique wildfire related risks. This isolated community has permanent year-round residents and seasonal tourists who come at the peak of fire season. Limited evacuation routes and proximity to forest fuels increase overall potential risk during a wildfire event. The area has been identified in the Logan Lake Wildfire Risk Management Plan (WRMP) as an area requiring attention and action. The proposed treatments will reduce wildfire hazard through fuel reduction treatments in areas with high fuel levels directly adjacent to residential developments. Logan Lake
Fox Farm and Lindley Creek Fuel Management Lower Nicola Indian Band Wildfire Risk Reduction This project aims to reduce wildfire risk and fuel loading in areas adjacent to Fox Farm and Lindley Creek subdivisions near Merritt, BC, and to reduce the overall negative impacts of wildfire. Activities include danger tree falling to make the area safer and facilitate access to the area by wildfire suppression crews, spacing and removal of ladder and ground fuels to reduce the risk of crown fires, and reduction of forest floor fuels to reduce fire intensity and rate of spread. Merritt
Wildfire Risk Reduction West of Blackpines/McLure Whispering Pines/ Clinton Indian Band Wildfire Risk Reduction Through this project, the Whispering Pines Indian Band/Pellt’iq’t People aim to reduce wildfire risk to areas in the wildland-urban interface areas along the west side of the North Thompson River in the vicinity of Black Pines and Whispering Pines. The corridor along the North Thompson River between Kamloops and Barriere has seen extensive fire activity in the last 15 years in similar stand types to those seen in the project area. Project activity will focus on tree thinning and the reduction of woody surface fuels adjacent to reserve lands and private property and enhancing strategic fuel breaks. Kamloops
Regional District of North Okanagan - Watershed Wildfire Management Planning and Operations Davies Wildfire Management Inc Wildfire Risk Reduction Four water purveyors in the Okanagan are proactively working together with Frontline Operations Group Ltd. (FLO) to protect this vital community resource in the immediate future and in the long term. Work will occur around residential developments as well as critical infrastructure associated with water intakes, treatment facilities, and communication towers essential to safe operations of the watersheds. The outcome for each project will be to produce management plans that are operationally feasible, ecologically appropriate, and account for all values and constraints within the watershed while ultimately protecting water quality and quantity as a resource. Lumby
Lake Country Watershed Wildfire Management Planning Davies Wildfire Management Inc Wildfire Risk Reduction Four water purveyors in the Okanagan are proactively working together with Frontline Operations Group Ltd. (FLO) to protect this vital community resource in the immediate future and in the long term. Work will occur around residential developments as well as critical infrastructure associated with water intakes, treatment facilities, and communication towers essential to safe operations of the watersheds. The outcome for each project will be to produce management plans that are operationally feasible, ecologically appropriate, and account for all values and constraints within the watershed while ultimately protecting water quality and quantity as a resource. Lake Country
Black Mountain Improvement District Watershed Wildfire Risk Reduction Davies Wildfire Management Inc Wildfire Risk Reduction Four water purveyors in the Okanagan are proactively working together with Frontline Operations Group Ltd. (FLO) to protect this vital community resource in the immediate future and in the long term. Work will occur around residential developments as well as critical infrastructure associated with water intakes, treatment facilities, and communication towers essential to safe operations of the watersheds. The outcome for each project will be to produce management plans that are operationally feasible, ecologically appropriate, and account for all values and constraints within the watershed while ultimately protecting water quality and quantity as a resource. Kelowna
Glenmore Ellison Improvement District Watershed Davies Wildfire Management Inc Wildfire Risk Reduction Four water purveyors in the Okanagan are proactively working together with Frontline Operations Group Ltd. (FLO) to protect this vital community resource in the immediate future and in the long term. Work will occur around residential developments as well as critical infrastructure associated with water intakes, treatment facilities, and communication towers essential to safe operations of the watersheds. The outcome for each project will be to produce management plans that are operationally feasible, ecologically appropriate, and account for all values and constraints within the watershed while ultimately protecting water quality and quantity as a resource. Kelowna
Comstock Long-term Fire Break TNR Consulting Wildfire Risk Reduction Fuel management prescription development and fuel reduction treatments south of Merrit. A portion of the residual waste fibre resulting from the treatments was utilized by a local bio-energy plant. The avoidance of pile burning reduces greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Merritt
Baldy Mt Resort Phase 1 - McKinney Baldy Mountain Resort Wildfire Risk Reduction This project involves creating fire break prescriptions in the McKinney Community Watershed to reduce wildfire risk. The Baldy Ski Resort and community worked with wildfire specialists to develop a wildfire fuel management project. The resort cabin owners were supportive of the treatments. A contractor completed the treatments at the designated locations which provides a landscape level barrier in an otherwise large forested drainage. Oliver
Logan Lake Wildfire Risk Management Plan (WRMP) Logan Lake Community Forest Corporation Wildfire Risk Reduction Development of a wildfire risk management plan for the community of Logan Lake that develops prevention strategies and identifies priority areas for wildfire risk reduction treatments. This plan will provide guidance to the community forest that meets multiple forest management objectives and optimizes the wildfire risk reduction opportunities with future harvesting plans. Logan Lake
Silver Star Mountain Resort Silver Star Mountain Resort Ltd. Wildfire Risk Reduction This project involved work to complete the Silver Star wildfire fuel break and a review to determine how to proceed with a prescribed burn to reduce surface fuels and improve deer and bear browse. The result was better protection for the community and improved habitat for wildlife. Silver Star Mountain Resort
District of Peachland Fuel Break District of Peachland Wildfire Risk Reduction This project was for prescriptions for a wildfire fuel break consistent with The District of Peachland's Community Wildfire Protection Plan. The project aimed to connect adjacent landscape fuel breaks and included a post treatment prescribed burn for wildlife habitat and browse improvement. Peachland
RDOS Fuel Breaks Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen Wildfire Risk Reduction This project was to create prescriptions to develop a landscape level fuel break in line with the City of Penticton's Community Wildfire Protection Plan and assessments for prescribed burning on steep slopes.These are landscape level fuel breaks that are based off the Penticton and Ellis Creek drainages. These draws were areas that were delineated within the recently completed City of Penticton (City) Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) as being good locations for landscape level fuel breaks. Similarly, this side of the valley was noted in the CWPP of the Regional District Okanagan Similkameen (RDOS) as in need of landscape level fuel breaks for community protection. No treatments are being undertaken as part of this funding as it is contemplated that BCTS harvesting at a later date would ensure timber revenue to the crown is maximized through field timber analysis and a professional prescription and harvest plan Penticton
Project Title Project Proponent Society Purpose Full Proposal Description Closest Community
West Coast Region
Riparian Restoration Project (Cowichan) The Cowichan Tribes Forest Carbon This project will rehabilitate several small but significant sections of the riparian zone adjacent to the Cowichan River. The area will be prescribed and treated to improve and restore part of the riparian ecosystem within the Cowichan Tribes traditional territories that are outside of the Timber Harvesting Land Base to a higher level of ecosystem functionality in accordance with Cowichan First Nations cultural values. A secondary objective will be to increase the carbon stocks of the restored site over the mid-to-long term. Older mature Red Alder will be thinned by felling some of the stems, which will be left on site for habitat and coarse woody debris. Large cedar and spruce seedlings 60cm tall will be planted by Band members and over time these will be brushed out so they grow quickly into mature forests. These mature forests represent a species mix that is more culturally desired by the Cowichan Tribes. Duncan
2019/20 Fertilization Taan Forest Forest Carbon The goal of this project is to enhance and accelerate successful growth of cedar on Haida Gwaii, which is particularly difficult to reestablish because of deer browse. Once the height of the cedar is above browse height it is important to ensure trees are successful in being dominant or co-dominant in the new forest. Hand fertilization of individual stems can give the tree the boost it needs to establish itself within the canopy of the new stand which will help meet the Haida Nation’s objective to have cedar for present and future generations of Haida. Individual tree fertilization of cedar also enhances carbon sequestration and the success of future old-growth forests. Skidegate
2017 FCI Fertilization Surveys FLNRORD - Forest Carbon Inititiative Forest Carbon Surveys to identify eligible areas for forest fertilization prescriptions and treatments. This project was the initial planning work for large Office of the Chief Forester projects to enhance carbon sequestion and avoid green house gas emissions. Chilliwack, Parksville, Duncan, Sooke
Graham & Moresby Island Fibre Utilization Taan Forest Forest Carbon This project enables the utilization of residual uneconomic and marginal fibre that would otherwise be burned. The project’s primary purpose is to reduce emissions that normally result from traditional timber harvesting residual pile burning. This residual fibre is currently uneconomical due to the high costs of logging and transportation associated with low-value residual fibre. Starting in December 2019 and continuing over the next 1 ½ years, this project will utilize approximately 51,000m³ of low-grade uneconomic logs (including pulp logs) that would otherwise be burned. These logs will be made available at market prices to coastal pulp mills. The project will be implemented on Taan Forest licenses to support increased utilization and decreased emissions, Provincial climate change objectives and create employment within Haida Gwaii and beyond. Taan Forest is 100% Haida owned. Queen Charlotte City
North Island Chipping Ltd. Fibre Utilization Strategic Natural Resource Consultants Inc. Forest Carbon This project will increase the amount of fibre recovered outside of the fibre recovery zones that would otherwise be piled and burned. Greenhouse gas emissions will be avoided by hauling fibre to the North Island Chipping Ltd. plant at Beaver Cove near Port McNeill. Most of the fibre will be manufactured into chips for pulp with a small component used for hog fuel. Port McNeill
North Island Fiber Utilization Trial Lions Gate Forest Products Limited Forest Carbon This project enables low-grade pulp fibre that would otherwise be burned to be recovered and utilized by the Nanaimo Forest Products Limited, Harmac Pacific pulp mill. The fibre will be trucked and barged in whole log form to the facility. The project is enabling the utilization of approximately 4,000 cubic meters of residual fibre from BC Timber Sales blocks where harvesting is complete in the Mackjack Creek area. This project helps to support the Province’s greenhouse gas reduction targets. Port Hardy
KFC Jackson Lake Storey Creek Trading (2016) Ltd Forest Carbon This project is an Incremental haul project where Storey Creek and partner contractors are salvaging pulp logs from harvesting areas outside of the Fibre Recovery Zone. The logs will be boomed and rafted to the Vancouver log market. The project covers the difference between the market price of these "uneconomic" logs and the cost to deliver them to the log market. Logs are chipped in the lower mainland and the chips are sold to local pulp mills. Bella Bella
Pulp Log Recovery for Coastal Pulp Mill Utilization Bella Coola Community Forest Ltd. Forest Carbon This project enabled the transportation of pulp wood otherwise uneconomic to haul. The pulp logs were processed and delivered to Bella Coola where they were stored before being transported via log barge to the Harmac Pacific Pulp Mill in Nanaimo. Utilization of pulp wood also contributed to wildfire reduction by recovering this fuel instead of leaving it in forested areas. This activity also provides employment and reduces greenhouse gas emission by recovering fibre that may otherwise have been burned. Bella Coola
Skeene Bay Salvage Storey Creek Trading (2016) Ltd Forest Carbon This project enables the transportation of uneconomic wood to a local pulp mill to increase fibre utilization. The residual fibre was recovered by a local logging contractor from areas in and around Skeene Bay, contributing to both local employment and increased fibre utilization. THE CHALLENGE: Logging operations in and around Skeene Bay had post-harvest residuals that were too expensive for the operators to remove and transport. THE OUTCOME: FESBC's funding helped local logging contractors to recover the residual fibre which increased utilization and contributed to local employment. Port Hardy
Kvamua - Sandell Phase 2 Storey Creek Trading (2016) Ltd Forest Carbon The project will be delivering pulp logs that are traditionally left behind due to economic barriers. The salvaged volume will be boomed to the Vancouver log market. Port Hardy
King Island Pulp Recovery Probyn Log Ltd. Forest Carbon This project enables low-grade pulp fibre that would otherwise be burned to be recovered and utilized by the Paper Excellence pulp mill in Howe Sound. The project is enabling the utilization of approximately 6,500 cubic meters of residual fibre from a BC Timber Sales block on King Island, approximately 70 km southwest of Bella Coola. This project helps to support the Province’s greenhouse gas reduction targets. Bella Bella
Haida Gwaii Enhanced Silviculture 2018 Taan Forest Habitat Enhancement The project, valued at $344,000, is locally supported to achieve long-term restoration objectives in areas within the Yakoun River drainage. One of Taan Forest’s goals is to have a permanent silviculture crew on Haida Gwaii comprised of members of the Haida Nation. The project is also focused on restoring wildlife habitat for salmon, black bear, and raptors while creating employment opportunities and enhancing the value of forest products such as western red cedar. Throughout the young stands identified for spacing treatments, there is very little black bear activity due to the high density of trees. The riparian work and spacing will create new access for the black bear and fertilization will increase growth and shorten time frames for the area to have trees and logs that can be utilized by the black bear for denning sites. 28,190 hectares of the Timber Harvest Land Base also falls within potentially valuable goshawk habitat, much of it being young second growth stands. Silviculture practices, to enhance growth, habitat, and mimic mature or old growth attributes, will benefit goshawks, which prefer to hunt in mature stands. THE CHALLENGE: On Haida Gwaii, there were areas where the density of the trees prevented the natural foraging and other activities of black bears and goshawks. THE OUTCOME: Thinning of trees was done by Haida forest workers to improve the area for wildlife, especially the hunting areas for Northern Goshawks and denning sites for black bears. The work also promoted the growth of economically and culturally important cedar trees. Masset
Riparian Restoration Taan Forest Habitat Enhancement This project will undertake treatments to improve habitat characterstics for important Goshawk forage. While riparian restoration often focuses on in-stream work and lower bench stabilization, the Haida Nation has concerns over any work conducted on the lower bench of large waterways, such as the Yakoun River (the project focus). This project focuses on benches within protected areas and the 100 year flood plain and are also red and blue listed ecosystems. The goal of the project is to repair these benchland riparian areas in a way that mimics the natural processes of riparian areas by accelerating the establishment of mature forest characteristics. Thinning, girdling and managing the woody debris are the main activites undertaken by the Haida workers. Spacing slash will provide temporary coarse wood debris and standing snags will provide wildlife habitat. These features will be replenished over time when individual trees die naturally in future years. The results of the project will be the acceleration of these forests towards older mature forest characteristics that ultimately resemble more closely the riparian benchlands prior to industrial disturbance. Port Clements
2019 Spacing and Pruning Taan Forest Habitat Enhancement The goal of this project is to create additional nesting sites and forage area for Goshawk on Haida Gwaii. Ecologically, the species composition of the area meets goshawk nesting and forage requirements but the density of the second growth stand interferes with nesting opportunities. This project aims to use spacing and thinning to expedite growth and dominance of leading species and increase habitat for goshawk in a shorter time frame than natural processes. Spacing and pruning is also is expected to enhance wildlife habitat, including goshawk forage habitat by creating open flight paths between trees and introducing light to the understorey for brush and berry development for goshawk prey forage. Shannon Bay
Improving Stand Value of Cedar - North Van Island Strategic Natural Resource Consultants Inc. Stand Rehabilitation This project's goal was to improve stand value of western red cedar by stem thinning to provide growing space, increase volume, and improve the health of the trees. The treatment will increase the commercial value of future stands and contribute to First Nations red cedar cultural values. Port Hardy
Woss Firebreak Management Regional District of Mount Waddington Wildfire Risk Reduction The project will reduce wildfire risk by removing surplus vegetation immediately adjacent to the Woss Community. The Woss community is in one of the highest risk areas on Vancouver Island and, as a result, the treatments were prioritized to protect the small community. The project also was designed to create local employment opportunities for a community hard hit by local strikes and depressed forestry economy. Woss
Haida Gwaii Fibre Recovery Husby Forest Products Fibre Recovery Utilization of uneconomic pulp from timber harvesting operations on Husby Forest Products Ltd. license areas on Haida Gwaii. The recovered fibre will no longer be required to be burnt and will support coastal pulp mills. The avoidance of pile burning results in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to the achievement of B.C.'s and Canada's climate change targets. Massett
Project Title Society Purpose Project Description Location
2017-2018 Co-Funded Projects - FESBC / HCTF
Fisher Habitat Conservation - Provincial Extension Program Habitat Enhancement This project will provide opportunities for training and the application of best management practices to a variety of forestry practitioners who make decisions that affect the supply of fisher habitat throughout British Columbia. Provincial (multi-region)
Determining factors that affect survival of moose in central BC Habitat Enhancement In response to declining moose numbers in central BC, a 5-year Provincially coordinated moose research study was initiated in 2013. This 2-year HCTF project will enable a Postdoctoral Fellow to analyze 5-years of survival of collared cow moose (Dec 2013–Mar 2018) with reference to the landscape-change hypothesis to help inform moose management in BC Provincial (multi-region)
West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project Habitat Enhancement The primary objective of this project is to reestablish viable Roosevelt Elk populations in wilderness areas of the West Coast Region while mitigating conflicts through translocation of elk from agricultural areas and along the highways of Vancouver Island, BC.Partnerships with community organizations, stakeholders, industry and First Nations governments, for translocations are key to facilitate recovery of this blue-listed species on Vancouver Island. Relocated herds will help improve ecosystem function and provide future opportunities for sustenance and recreational uses in new population units. Vancouver Island
Improving Wildlife Habitat in Logged and Fire-Damaged Coastal Forests Habitat Enhancement We will increase the quantity and quality of habitat for wetland-dependent wildlife on the Sunshine Coast by working with logging contractors and tenure holders to conserve wetlands during forestry operations, and to restore, enhance, and create wetlands in recently logged and fire damaged forests. Lower Mainland
Fisher Artificial Reproductive Den Box Study Habitat Enhancement Fisher are the largest obligate cavity user and use cavities in large diameter den trees for reproductive dens. Suitable trees for reproductive dens are rare in the landscape and impacts due to MPB and fire in many areas of the province have further reduced the availability of this habitat feature. This project will demonstrate the extent that artificial den boxes can be used to augment fisher reproductive denning habitat in areas where natural den trees have been reduced. Thompson - Nicola
Thompson Burn Program Habitat Enhancement The intent of this project will be to reintroduce fire into the low-mid elevation dry forest and grassland ecosystems to restore and improve forage nutrition and availability primarily for mule deer and bighorn sheep. Thompson - Nicola
Boundary Restoration and Enhancement Program Habitat Enhancement This project will improve habitat quality, resiliency and forage availability for ungulates and other native species by restoring or enhancing degraded habitats in a range of ecosystems across the Boundary. This project will build community stewardship and technical capacity through the use of partnerships and local contractors. Kootenays
Improving Mountain Caribou Calf Survival through Maternal Penning in the Revelstoke Area Habitat Enhancement Mountain caribou calf survival remains too low to support population recovery. This project will determine if maternal penning can improve the survival of calves and adults in the Columbia Mountains Ecosystem by protecting them in a secure enclosure for four months until calves are larger and more capable of avoiding predation. If successful, this tool will would help to reduce the rate of decline and increase the size of the Columbia North caribou subpopulation. Kootenays
West Kootenay Mule Deer Habitat Restoration Habitat Enhancement This project will identify important mule deer habitats in the West Kootenay and plan ecosystem restoration activities to improve quality of habitat. Kootenays
Enhancing Wolf Monitoring in the Kootenay Region Habitat Enhancement Work with key stakeholders, First Nations, and contract and provincial biologists to assess cost-effective ways of surveying wolves and compile historical data on wolf population trends. The research will involve a literature review of existing and emerging methods to survey wolves, an assessment of cost-effectiveness for these methods, and stakeholder engagement to develop new citizen-science tools to monitor wolf distribution, abundance, and trends. Kootenays
Restoring Ungulate Habitat Through Clumpy Spacing Habitat Enhancement A clumpy-spacing trial was installed in 1990 to examine habitat enhancement for ungulates through a unique spacing regime of overstocked stands of juvenile trees.This project will evaluate whether clumping spacing enhanced habitat use by ungulates and regionally important wildlife. Cariboo
High Lake Grassland and Open Forest Restoration Pilot Habitat Enhancement This three year project will remove tree encroachment from grasslands and ingrowth from Douglas-fir stands within mule deer winter range in Churn Creek Protected Area.It will evaluate and demonstrate a model for treating more extensive areas within the Protected Area. Cariboo
Ecology of small mammals in post-fire and salvage-logged landscapes Habitat Enhancement Fires and post-fire salvage-logging have unknown but likely significant impacts on small mammals, which are often important prey species for forest carnivores.This project will quantify abundances and distribution of mice and voles, snowshoe hares, and red squirrels in response to these disturbances in a study area where we are conducting concurrent work on marten. Cariboo
The response of caribou terrestrial forage lichens to MPB, forest harvesting and fire in the East Ootsa and Entiako areas Habitat Enhancement This project assesses the effects of MPB, forest harvesting and fire on caribou terrestrial forage lichens on the Tweedsmuir-Entiako caribou winter range by re-measuring permanent sample plots that were established in 2001 and remeasured in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2011 Skeena
Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat Habitat Enhancement This project is restoring endangered whitebark pine ecosystems with high habitat value for bears in the southern Skeena Region. In 2017-18 we will plant 6500 rust-free seedlings in two BC Parks and a Community Forest, scope out the 2018 cone crop, stratify & sow 20,000 seeds, and continue capacity-building and outreach. Skeena
Enhancing caribou survival within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds Habitat Enhancement This is year 4 of 5 planned years during which maternal penning will be used as one of several complementary emergency measures implemented to avert extirpation, and eventually recover, the population of caribou known as the Klinse-Za/Scott herds located in the south Peace region of northern British Columbia. Omineca/Peace
Mule Deer Monitoring in the Prince George area Habitat Enhancement Mule deer provide significant hunting opportunities in central BC. However, local observations from hunters have consistently reported declining mule deer numbers in the Prince George area and there is no inventory or trend monitoring to validate these concerns.The Spruce City Wildlife Association is seeking funds to help establish a long-term monitoring program for mule deer within the wildlife management units surrounding Prince George.With support from Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO), bi-annual ground based surveys will be conducted by local hunters/volunteers to document fawn recruitment, sex ratios and buck age classes that will provide key information on population vital rates and trend; such information will help biologists understand how mule deer demographics change seasonally and over time and will facilitate mule deer management. Omineca/Peace
Effects of habitat alteration on caribou forage lichens Habitat Enhancement This project assesses the effects of MPB, logging and prescribed fire on caribou terrestrial forage lichens on the Wolverine and Tweedsmuir-Entiako caribou winter ranges.Previously established permanently marked plots at 3 sites will be re-measured in 2017 and will be combined with data collected at 5 sites in 2016 for analysis. Omineca/Peace
Assessment of habitat alteration on caribou ranges in northern BC Habitat Enhancement The project will assess the current level of habitat alteration on caribou ranges in northern BC using available GIS datasets, and identify information gaps and issues. Omineca/Peace
Forage Response to Prescribed Fire in the Northern Rockies : Implications for Stone's Sheep and elk - 7 Years Later Habitat Enhancement This project will assess the long-term influence of prescribed fire of forage characteristics for Stone's sheep and elk. It will make recommendations to improve the current prescribed burning program relative to effective timing by contrasting the plant and animal immediate responses (1 year after burning) to longer-term responses (7 years post burn). Omineca/Peace
Wolf predation risk to moose in north-central BC Habitat Enhancement This project will investigate seasonal wolf predation risk to moose in two of the provincial moose research project study sites. We will track kill sites of 5 wolf packs in each site by deploying satellite collars and checking location clusters for evidence of prey type killed while also determining space use parameters and resource selection. Omineca/Peace
Testing Approaches to Restore Habitat For Caribou Habitat Enhancement This project will restore caribou habitat by mitigating historic linear features thus providing long term protection for the Klinse-Za population (Moberly and Scott East Herds) and reducing the need for the current emergency maternal penning and predator control strategies which are currently preventing extirpation. Omineca/Peace
Fish and Wildlife Habitat Enhancement in the Omineca Region Habitat Enhancement This collaborative project aims to identify areas for potential habitat enhancement in designated Wildlife Habitat Areas and Fisheries Sensitive Watersheds throughout the Omineca Region. SERN will identify specific sites and then submit HCTF proposals to develop prescriptions and implemented treat treatments where warranted. Omineca/Peace
South Okanagan Similkameen Conservation Program (SOSCP) Habitat Conservation Delivery Habitat Enhancement This project will establish fish and wildlife habitat conservation and protection measures through a collaborative partnership model. Focus is on coordinating and implementing of Keeping Nature in Our Future: A Biodiversity Conservation Strategy for the South Okanagan Similkameen, local and regional government environmental planning initiatives and leveraging of resources within the South Okanagan Similkameen Region. Okanagan
Determining the value of post-fire landscapes for American marten Habitat Enhancement American marten are important furbearers in BC, but strategies to facilitate marten recovery postfire have not been established.Our proposal addresses marten population and behavioral responses to fire and post-fire salvage logging to identify post-fire management decisions most likely to meet management goals. Okanagan
Project Title Society Purpose Project Description Location
2018-2019 Co-Funded Projects - FESBC / HCTF
Got Bats? B.C. Community Outreach, Conservation and Citizen Science Project Habitat Enhancement "Got Bats?" is a network of community bat projects across BC that promotes bat conservation through the detection and protection of bat roosts, education to counter negative attitudes towards bats, installation of bat‐houses, and a province‐wide Citizen Science bat count to engage the public and detect population declines due to White-nose Syndrome and other threats. Implemented by local, established stewardship organizations with direct landowner contacts in each region, the importance of this initiative has been widely recognized by the BC Government and BC Bat Action Team, and support for the program is a high priority action item in the BC Bat Action Plan (BC Bat Action Team, 2016). Provincial (multi-region)
Clarifying problematic distributions and habitat use of amphibians at risk in southwestern British Columbia using environmental DNA methods. Habitat Enhancement This project investigates the distribution of four frog species of conservation concern, focusing primarily on the endangered Oregon Spotted Frog. An accurate understanding of the current distributions is required to support appropriate management and species recovery. Environmental DNA methods will be applied, in collaboration with university partners, to achieve increased survey efficacy and accuracy relative to conventional methods. Provincial (multi-region)
Monitoring and Protecting BC''''s bat diversity prior to White-Nose Syndrome Habitat Enhancement White-nose Syndrome continues to devastate eastern bat populations, and is found in Washington state in the west. We will continue to work with cavers and other citizen scientists to identify critical bat habitat, and establish baseline species diversity and relative abundance -- reference points necessary for future monitoring, surveillance, mitigation, and recovery. Provincial (multi-region)
Determining factors that affect survival of moose in central BC (18-0522) Habitat Enhancement In response to declining moose numbers in central BC, a 5-year Provincially coordinated moose research study was initiated in 2013. This 2-year HCTF project will enable a Postdoctoral Fellow to analyze 5-years of survival of collared cow moose (Dec 2013–Dec 2018) with reference to the landscape-change hypothesis to help inform moose management in BC. Provincial (multi-region)
Rattlesnake populations: Response to land management regimes and historical changes. Habitat Enhancement This project revisits the ecology of populations of Western Rattlesnakes (a species-at-risk) originally studied over 30 years ago. The main questions addressed are (i) how have snake populations changed over 30+ years, and (ii) how do different management regimes affected these changes? Given that data of this type are practically nonexistent, this project will provide important new data for assessing how landscape use and attributes affect these animals. Provincial (multi-region)
Developing a prophylactic probiotic approach for reducing white-nose syndrome severity in bats Habitat Enhancement We will develop a prophylaxis for the prevention of white-nose syndrome. To accomplish this, we will derive a probiotic cocktail from anti-Pd bacteria and fungi naturally found on healthy western bat wings and apply to a large mixed roost of Little Brown and Yuma Myotis bats 200 km from the current WNS infection in Washington State. Bats that receive these inoculations at their maternity building roost will leave to hibernation with an altered wing flora comprised of a greater representation of anti-Pd microbes to delay or prevent Pd growth for a critical portion of the winter, hopefully enabling bats to successfully survive hibernation, and establishing a new method to reduce WNS mortality. Provincial (multi-region)
Effects of human disturbances on female wolverines Habitat Enhancement Understanding if human activities permanently displace female wolverines from otherwise suitable habitat is critical to long-term population sustainability. This large-scale survey will use non-invasive methods to examine distribution and habitat selection of female wolverine in the Columbia Mountains and investigate regional gene-flow patterns. Provincial (multi-region)
Fisher Habitat Conservation - Field Trials and Forestry Training Habitat Enhancement This project strives to increase the ability of foresters and forest workers to improve habitat outcomes for fishers in their operations and inspire them to include habitat needs of fishers in their forest management decisions. Provincial (multi-region)
Determining factors affecting moose population change: assessing calving and survival rates. Habitat Enhancement This project will enable new and continued information flow on moose population trends required for management decisions by assessing calf and cow survival rates and calving rates. These demographic parameters are primary drivers of population trend and key research gaps identified from the initial 5-year (2013-2018) Provincial Moose Research Project.> Provincial (multi-region)
Estimating Cougar (Puma concolor vancouverensis) Populations on Northern Vancouver Island using DNA mark-recapture techniques Habitat Enhancement This project utilizes DNA-based mark-recapture inventory techniques and closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to create science-based cougar population estimates for Northern Vancouver Island. This project is properly designed, includes partnerships/stakeholders, and is science based, cost-effective and repeatable. Vancouver Island
West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project Habitat Enhancement The primary objective of this project is to re-establish viable Roosevelt Elk populations in wilderness areas of the West Coast Region while mitigating conflicts through translocation of elk from agricultural areas and along the highways of Vancouver Island, BC. Partnerships with community organizations, stakeholders, industry and First Nations governments, for translocations are key to facilitate recovery of this blue-listed species on Vancouver Island and are proven as instrumental on the mainland coast. Relocated herds will help improve ecosystem function and provide future opportunities for sustenance and recreational uses in new population units. Vancouver Island
Evaluating furbearer populations on southern Vancouver Island Habitat Enhancement This collaborative project is using non-invasive survey techniques to evaluate the distribution and abundance of Pacific martens, American minks, and Vancouver Island ermines, on southern Vancouver Island to help trappers and land managers maintain sustainable populations of these species. Vancouver Island
Conservation of Threatened Raptors on the Sunshine Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct surveys to identify and assess occupied breeding territories for Western Screech-Owls and Northern Goshawks on the Sunshine Coast, and work with government, First Nations, industry, and landowners to protect these areas. Complementary engagement activities will improve awareness and participation in raptor stewardship activities. Lower Mainland
Improving Wildlife Habitat in Logged and Fire-Damaged Coastal Forests Habitat Enhancement We will increase the quantity and quality of habitat for wetland-dependent wildlife on the Sunshine Coast by working with logging contractors and tenure holders to conserve wetlands during forestry operations, and to restore, enhance, and create wetlands in recently logged and fire-damaged forests. Lower Mainland
Sustaining mesocarnivore populations and habitat in the Lower Mainland watersheds Habitat Enhancement This project will use non-invasive survey techniques to evaluate the distribution, habitat use, and human-caused threats of mesocarnivore populations in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. This information is necessary to help trappers and land managers maintain sustainable populations in the Lower Mainland. Lower Mainland
Wolverine (Gulo gulo) movements, home range and habitat use in a human dominated landscape, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to examine home ranges, seasonal movements, and habitat use of wolverines in the South Coast. While inventories have been completed, further information is needed on movements, home range size, and habitat use in relation to human activities in order to better manage wolverines in a multiple use landscape. This proposal builds on the inventory and distribution data collected in HCTF Projects 2-519 and 2-600, and will help expand the pilot collaring study we will begin in February 2017. Lower Mainland
Improving Goshawk conservation by addressing knowledge-gaps in the South Coast Habitat Enhancement To investigate the efficacy of new telemetry technologies for addressing knowledge-gaps identified in the recovery strategy. Advancing our understanding of how Goshawks interact with their habitat will help enable us to implement meaningful conservation measures that address current threats to populations in the south coast region. Lower Mainland
Fisher Artificial Reproductive Den Box Study Habitat Enhancement Fisher are the largest obligate cavity user and use cavities in large diameter den trees for reproductive dens. Suitable trees for reproductive dens are rare in the landscape and impacts due to MPB and fire in many areas of the province have further reduced the availability of this habitat feature. This project will demonstrate the extent that artificial den boxes can be used to augment fisher reproductive denning habitat in areas where natural den trees have been reduced. Thompson - Nicola
Thompson Region Bighorn Sheep Collaring Project Habitat Enhancement This project aims to collar 30-33 bighorn sheep rams from different herds in the Thompson region to better quantify connectivity of Thompson bighorn sheep herds, as well as clarify core home range use, summer and winter range migration timing and movement rates and ram foray patterns. The project will also develop a herd health baseline dataset from biological samples from individuals in each herd. Thompson - Nicola
Boundary Restoration and Enhancement Program Habitat Enhancement This project will improve habitat quality, resiliency and forage availability for ungulates and other native species by restoring or enhancing degraded habitats in a range of ecosystems across the Boundary. This project will build community stewardship and technical capacity through the use of partnerships and local contractors. Kootenays
Kootenay Mule Deer Survival Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will assess factors limiting mule deer population growth in 4 study areas in the Kootenay Region by monitoring adult female survival, cause of death and fawn recruitment. Kootenays
Elk Valley Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Inventory Habitat Enhancement To monitor the population health and status of bighorn sheep along the east side of the Elk Valley. To provide data regarding habitat use and distribution to improve management of bighorn sheep.  Kootenays
West Kootenay Mule Deer Habitat Restoration Habitat Enhancement This project will identify important mule deer habitats in the West Kootenay and plan ecosystem restoration activities to improve quality of habitat. Kootenays
Bull River Bighorn Sheep: Herd Health and Movement Dynamics Habitat Enhancement This will be the third and final year for this project. A total of 15 GPS collars have been deployed with 1 mortality. This year we will compile and analyze 2 years of GPS collar data and compile herd health sampling results. A final report will be available at the end of the 2018-19 project year, unless more collars are deployed during the winter of 2017-18. There has been some uncertainty in the population estimate of the Bull River bighorn sheep with survey flights in 2017 (prior to collaring) indicating a 40% population decline. We may deploy up to 5 more collars during 2017-18 winter if new survey data suggests a larger population in order to sample a minimum of 17% of the herd. Kootenays
Invasive plant management on bighorn sheep winter ranges Habitat Enhancement This will be the third and final year for this project. A total of 15 GPS collars have been deployed with 1 mortality. This year we will compile and analyze 2 years of GPS collar data and compile herd health sampling results. A final report will be available at the end of the 2018-19 project year, unless more collars are deployed during the winter of 2017-18. There has been some uncertainty in the population estimate of the Bull River bighorn sheep with survey flights in 2017 (prior to collaring) indicating a 40% population decline. We may deploy up to 5 more collars during 2017-18 winter if new survey data suggests a larger population in order to sample a minimum of 17% of the herd. Kootenays
Longevity of Woody Debris Habitat Structures for Prey Species of Furbearers: Ghost-towns or Viable Habitat? Habitat Enhancement Piles and windrows of woody debris on new clear-cuts provide corridors to assist marten, small weasels, and some larger carnivores to cross forest openings. Small mammal prey species are also enhanced in these structures. We ask if these responses of prey species are maintained at 11-12 years after these restoration habitats were constructed. Kootenays
Diversifying MPB Clear-cuts for Small Mustelids: Green-tree Retention, Debris Piles, and Enhanced Riparian Habitats. Habitat Enhancement Restoration of wildlife habitat with combined habitat components after clear-cut harvesting of MPB-killed lodgepole pine stands. Three methods of habitat enhancement for small mustelids and their prey species to diversify clear-cuts include (1) green-tree retention, (2) woody debris piles, and (3) enhanced riparian zones. Kootenays
Predicting grizzly bear foods – Huckleberries across the Kootenays Habitat Enhancement This project will expand our previous project that accurately predicted grizzly bears’ most important regional food resource – huckleberries - across most of the Kootenay region. Between 2013-2016 we developed an accurate predictive model for huckleberry patches-important-to-grizzly-bears in the south Selkirk and Purcell Mts. This project will expand that model into the east and north Kootenays, the Central Purcell and Selkirks, the Valhalla, and Granby regions. Our huckleberry patch model is already being used by resource managers to plan timber harvest and protect important berry patches through access controls. There is a strong demand for this model to be expanded regionally for these same purposes. Kootenays
Quantify rates and mechanisms of grizzly bear mortality Habitat Enhancement Use radio telemetry to identify the rates and causes of bear mortality (reported and unreported) in a population of bears facing one of the highest human-caused mortality rates in the province. Currently, the degree of under-reporting is unknown and suspected to be high, and these uncertainties compromise science-based management of grizzly bears locally and provincially. This project builds on a large body of research and previously collected data to provide recommendations for pressing management concerns and to engage the community in grizzly bear conservation. Kootenays
Enhancing wolf monitoring with bioacoustics in the East Kootenays. Habitat Enhancement The project objective is to develop a cost‐effective survey method to measure wolf abundance and trend in the Kootenay-Boundary Region by assessing the effectiveness of bioacoustics and comparing it with established methods, such as camera-trap based occupancy. Kootenays
Quantifying and enhancing pest services provided by bats to the BC Timber Industry Habitat Enhancement This project focuses on scoping methods and costs to enhance and quantify pest services provided by bats to the forest industry. The project's goals include: (1) Identifying the pest services provided by bats to the forest industry and (2) Testing new enhancement methods that could be used by the forest industry to re-establish bat roosts where roosts are limiting or have been impacted by forest practices.  Kootenays
Maintenance of Furbearers and Prey Species on Large Clear-cut Openings Using Linear Piles of Woody Debris Habitat Enhancement This proposal is designed to investigate the responses of small mustelids and their prey species to piles of woody debris arranged in a linear configuration across large (50+ ha) clear-cut openings. Presence of these mammals in piles will indicate that these structures are effective as habitat in large clear-cut openings. Kootenays
Monitoring white-tailed deer to support adaptive caribou management Habitat Enhancement The majority of caribou herds in western Canada are declining, largely due to increased predator abundance supported by invading moose and white-tailed deer. Our project will evaluate factors influencing white-tailed deer populations to support mountain caribou management decisions. Kootenays
Restoring Ungulate Habitat Through Clumpy Spacing Habitat Enhancement A clumpy-spacing trial was installed in 1990 to examine habitat enhancement for ungulates (deer winter range) through a unique spacing regime of overstocked stands of juvenile trees. This project will evaluate whether clumping spacing enhanced habitat use by ungulates and regionally-important wildlife. Cariboo
Ecology of small mammals in post-fire and salvage-logged landscapes Habitat Enhancement Fires and post-fire salvage-logging have unknown but likely significant impacts on small mammals, which are important prey species for forest carnivores. This project will quantify abundances and distribution of mice and voles, snowshoe hares, and red squirrels in response to these disturbances west of Williams Lake, where we are conducting concurrent work on marten. Cariboo
Recreation and land use impacts on South Chilcotin Mountains wildlife Habitat Enhancement We will use camera trapping and advanced statistical analyses to untangle the relative impacts of environmental factors and human activities on the distribution and abundance of key wildlife species (e.g., grizzly bears, mountain goats). The results will help managers and stakeholders assess how human activities impact the area's wildlife. Cariboo
Sheep Flats Ecosystem Restoration Habitat Enhancement This one year project will restore important California Bighorn Sheep habitat in Churn Creek Protected Area by removing tree encroachment and ingrowth from Sheep Flats grasslands and forests.  Cariboo
Assessing cougar density in The Cariboo Region through non-invasive survey techniques Habitat Enhancement A mark-recapture DNA science-based project utilizing closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to estimate cougar population densities in a study area of region 5. This project will incorporate a citizen science component for estimating cougar populations by including stakeholders. Cariboo
Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat Habitat Enhancement This is yr 2 in the 2nd 5-yr cycle of a multiparter project to restore endangered whitebark pine ecosystems with high value for bears in the southern Skeena Region. 2018-19 plans include (1) a major seed collection; (2) stratifying >20000 seeds (3) rust-resistance screening; (4) monitoring 2017 plantings; and (4) capacity-building and outreach. Skeena
Moose Fund: Skeena Moose Enhancement Project Habitat Enhancement 2018/2019: The second year of the Skeena Moose Enhancement Project will consist of developing a moose habitat enhancement manual that provides a comprehensive evaluation of enhancement options available with detailed descriptions of the techniques including planning, implementation and monitoring phases. Skeena
Moose Winter Range Willow Browse Enhancement Habitat Enhancement Mature willow felling/hinging to promote moose forage production. Skeena
Assessing Impact on Moose Winter Habitat by Poplar and Willow Borer Habitat Enhancement The extent of the poplar and willow borer infestation in BC has not been assessed since 1999 and implications on moose habitat have not been investigated despite the overlap with declining moose populations over the past decade. This project will examine the current distribution of the poplar and willow borer and the species'' impact to moose winter habitat in the Skeena Region. Skeena
Enhancing caribou survival within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds Habitat Enhancement This will be Year 5 of 5 planned years during which maternal penning will be used as one of several complementary emergency measures implemented to avert extirpation, and eventually recover, the population of caribou known as the Klinse-Za/Scott herds located in the south Peace region of northern British Columbia. Omineca/Peace
Wolf predation risk to moose in north-central BC Habitat Enhancement This project would investigate seasonal wolf predation risk to moose in two of the provincial moose research project study sites. We would track kill sites of up to 10 wolf packs in each site by deploying satellite collars and checking location clusters for evidence and type of prey killed, while also determining space use parameters and resource selection. Omineca/Peace
Chase Caribou Herd Response to Extensive Habitat Alterations - Year 2 Habitat Enhancement This project will assess the potential impacts of recent large-scale habitat alterations caused by damaged forests (wildfire and mountain pine beetle) on the population stability of the Chase caribou herd. We will contrast current population parameters (i.e., seasonal range use, habitat use/selection, mortality causes, and calf recruitment) to population parameters of the herd prior to recent disturbance. Omineca/Peace
Boreal Caribou Habitat Restoration in the Liard River Basin Habitat Enhancement This project builds on Fort Nelson First Nation's 2017 Boreal Caribou Action Plan to identify high priority areas for habitat restoration in the Liard River basin, an area which includes four of the five identified boreal caribou ranges in British Columbia. A detailed restoration plan, including site-specific prescriptions, will developed for one of these areas. Implementation in a pilot area (up to 1,000 ha), is targeted for 2019. The result of this work will be ongoing active restoration of the legacy industry footprint in boreal caribou habitat in the Liard Basin, and ongoing monitoring to determine how effective this work is for reversing boreal caribou population declines. Omineca/Peace
KlinseZa/Scott East Caribou Maternal Pen Health Evaluation Habitat Enhancement The Klinse-Za maternal penning project helped reverse the population decline in the herd. However, capturing and penning wild caribou has direct and indirect health consequences and little is known of their health overall. In this project, we propose to evaluate the baseline health characteristics of this herd, as well as identify positive and negative health effects of penning, across four key parameters: disease, stress, body condition, and diet. Omineca/Peace
Sharp-tailed Grouse Population and Lek Habitat Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will re-initiate the monitoring of sharp-tailed grouse populations in the North, and will quantify habitat characteristics of lek sites. Results of this project will contribute to management of the species and provide guidance to industrial proponents to minimize impacts to sharp-tailed grouse. Omineca/Peace
Determining the value of post-fire landscapes for American marten Habitat Enhancement American marten are important furbearers in BC, but strategies to facilitate marten recovery post-fire have not been established. Our proposal addresses marten population and behavioral responses to fire and post-fire salvage- logging to identify post-fire management decisions most likely to meet management goals. Okanagan
Mule deer response to wildfire and habitat in southern British Columbia Habitat Enhancement Identify the effect of wildfire on mule deer habitat selection and population growth in the Boundary Region, West Okanagan, and Bonaparte Plateau areas of British Columbia, and provide management tools and recommendations to increase mule deer abundance. Okanagan
Project Title Society Purpose Project Description Location
2019-2020 Co-Funded Projects - FESBC / HCTF
Got Bats? B.C. Community Outreach, Conservation and Citizen Science Project Habitat Enhancement "Got Bats?" is a network of community bat projects across BC that promotes bat conservation through the detection and protection of bat roosts, education to counter negative attitudes towards bats, enhancement of habitat including installation of bat‐houses, and a province‐wide Citizen Science bat count to engage the public and detect population declines due to White-nose Syndrome and other threats. Implemented by local, established stewardship organizations with direct landowner contacts in each region, the importance of this initiative has been widely recognized by the BC Government and BC Bat Action Team, and support for the program is a high priority action item in the BC Bat Action Plan (BC Bat Action Team, 2016). Multi-Region
Monitoring and Protecting BC''s bat diversity prior to White-Nose Syndrome Habitat Enhancement White-nose Syndrome continues to devastate eastern bat populations, and is found in Washington state in the west. We will continue to work with cavers and other citizen scientists to identify important bat habitats, and establish baseline species diversity and relative abundance -- reference points necessary for future monitoring, surveillance, mitigation, and recovery. Multi-Region
Rattlesnake populations: Response to land management regimes and historical changes. Habitat Enhancement This project revisits the ecology of populations of Western Rattlesnakes (a species-at-risk) originally studied over 30 years ago. The main questions being addressed are (i) how have snake populations changed over 30+ years, and (ii) how do different management regimes affect these changes? Given that data of this type are practically nonexistent, this project will provide important new data for assessing how landscape use and attributes affect these animals. Multi-Region
Developing a prophylactic probiotic approach for reducing white-nose syndrome severity in bats Habitat Enhancement Using bacteria sourced from local healthy bats, we have derived a probiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of white-nose syndrome (WNS), the fungal disease poised to devastate western North American bat populations. Now that we have successfully tested this probiotic on captive building-roosting bats, we have concluded that it is effective at changing bat wing microbiomes and slows the growth of the fungus (referred to as Pd) which causes this deadly bat disease, readying us for a final captive trial then field implementation in 2019. At maternity roosts in the Vancouver region we will compare bat ecology and health pre- and post-treatment prior to when bats leave to hibernation with an enhanced anti-WNS wing flora which we anticipate will delay or prevent Pd growth for a long enough portion of the winter to increase survivorship. Multi-Region
Fisher Habitat Conservation – Extension and Field Trials Habitat Enhancement This project strives to increase the ability of foresters and forest workers to improve habitat outcomes for fishers in their operations and inspire them to include habitat needs of fishers in their forest management decisions. Multi-Region
Determining factors affecting moose population change: assessing calving and survival rates Habitat Enhancement This project will enable new and continued information flow on moose population trends required for management decisions by assessing calf and cow survival rates and calving rates. These demographic parameters are primary drivers of population trend and key research gaps identified from the initial 5-year (2013-2018) Provincial Moose Research Project. Multi-Region
Using Local Knowledge and Hunter-based Sampling to Inform Mountain Caribou Conservation Habitat Enhancement We will fill knowledge gaps on health status and population trends of Northern Mountain caribou herds in BC through rigorous documentation of guide-outfitter knowledge and analyzing biological samples from harvested caribou. Concurrently, we will work with communities to develop capacity and a framework for community-based monitoring of wildlife health, status and trends. Multi-Region
Estimating Cougar (Puma concolor vancouverensis) Populations on Northern Vancouver Island using DNA mark-recapture techniques Habitat Enhancement This project utilizes DNA-based mark-recapture inventory techniques and closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to create science-based cougar population estimates for Northern Vancouver Island. This project is properly designed, includes partnerships/stakeholders, and is science based, cost-effective and repeatable. Vancouver Island
West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project Habitat Enhancement The primary objective of this project is to re-establish viable Roosevelt Elk populations in wilderness areas of the West Coast Region while mitigating conflicts through translocation of elk from agricultural areas and along the highways of Vancouver Island, BC. Partnerships with community organizations, stakeholders, industry and First Nations governments, for translocations are key to facilitate recovery of this blue-listed species on Vancouver Island and are proven as instrumental on the mainland coast. Relocated herds will help improve ecosystem function and provide future opportunities for sustenance and recreational uses in new population units. Vancouver Island
Seasonal habitat supply for the management and restoration of Roosevelt Elk Habitat Enhancement We will deploy over 60 GPS collars on Roosevelt Elk on Vancouver Island to validate an existing winter habitat model and develop habitat models for all seasons to quantify the relationship between habitat use and elk populations. Project outcomes will improve elk habitat and population management decisions. Vancouver Island
Reestablishing Vancouver Island Marmots in Strathcona Provincial Park Habitat Enhancement The Marmot Recovery Foundation will build and extend on efforts to reintroduce Vancouver Island Marmots to Strathcona Provincial Park, and create a self-sustaining population of the endemic mammals. Efforts will focus on translocations, food enhancement, monitoring and potentially habitat restoration as guided by BC Parks. Vancouver Island
South Coast Grizzly Bear Ecology and Cumulative Effects Research Habitat Enhancement This project is investigating several aspects of grizzly bear ecology, with a focus on space-use and movements relative to influential factors of habitat and human activity. Inferences will be directly relevant to understanding short- and long-term implications of cumulative human impacts on grizzly bear recovery and conservation. >Data will also contribute to long-term tracking of population responses. Predictive outputs that are empirically tested will serve to direct appropriate mitigation and conservation strategies. Lower Mainland
Conservation of Threatened Raptors on the Sunshine Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct surveys to identify and assess occupied breeding territories for Northern Goshawks on the Sunshine Coast, and will work with government, First Nations, industry, and landowners to protect habitat for Goshawks and other raptors. Community engagement activities will improve awareness and participation in raptor stewardship. Lower Mainland
Improving Wildlife Habitat in Logged and Fire-Damaged Coastal Forests Habitat Enhancement We will increase the quantity and quality of habitat for wetland-dependent wildlife on the Sunshine Coast by working with logging contractors and tenure holders to conserve, restore, enhance, and create wetlands in recently logged and fire-damaged forests. Lower Mainland
Wolverine (Gulo gulo) movements, home range and habitat use in a human dominated landscape, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to examine home ranges, seasonal movements, and habitat use of wolverines in the South Coast. While inventories have been completed, further information is needed on movements, home range size, and habitat use in relation to human activities in order to better manage wolverines in a multiple use landscape. This proposal builds on the inventory and distribution data collected in HCTF Projects 2-519 and 2-600. Lower Mainland
Mountain Goat Seasonal Movements and Habitat Use in the Mount Meager Complex, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to radio collar (GPS) 35-45 mountain goats in the Mount Meager Complex. The objectives are to determine if these goats make large seasonal movements to and from winter ranges, as well as quantify habitat use in winter and summer in relation to the burned habitats. As this is a hunted population and perhaps one of the largest and most important goat populations in the South Coast, this information on seasonal movements and habitat use is crucial in our understanding of how to better manage this population. Lower Mainland
Roosevelt Elk Inventory - South Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct inventory of Roosevelt Elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) in the South Coast Region, through annual aerial flights. This project will generate population estimates for each unit surveyed and results will lead to improved conservation, management and planning. Lower Mainland
Thompson Region Bighorn Sheep Collaring Project Habitat Enhancement This project aims to collar 30-33 bighorn sheep rams from different herds in the Thompson region to better quantify connectivity of Thompson bighorn sheep herds, as well as clarify core home range use, summer and winter range migration timing and movement rates and ram foray patterns. The project will also develop a herd health baseline dataset from biological samples from individuals in each herd. Thompson - Nicola
Monitoring the Stein/Nahatlatch Grizzly Bear Population during Recovery. Habitat Enhancement This isolated and Critically Endangered grizzly bear population has been monitored using DNA sampling since 2005. To avoid an extended break in this continuity, we plan to continue the monitoring as the Province implements recovery actions every two years. The project is structured consistent with the spirit of Reconciliation and with the principals of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) “to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions”. Thompson - Nicola
South Rockies Grizzly Bear Inventory Habitat Enhancement We have been monitoring grizzly bear population trend in wildlife management units 4-01, 4-02, and 4-23 since 2006. Analysis has informed management decisions such as adjusting hunting quotas based on recent field-based population estimates, closing the hunting season in the South Rockies GBPU after a period of population decline, and planning access closures near huckleberry patches in 4-23. We now intend to focus on understanding and mitigating the causes of non-hunting mortality, especially when it is not reported nor recorded in the provincial mortality data and, monitor the recovery from the recent population decline. Kootenays
Boundary Restoration and Enhancement Program Habitat Enhancement This project will improve habitat quality, resiliency and forage availability for ungulates and other native species by restoring or enhancing degraded habitats in a range of ecosystems across the Boundary. This project will build community stewardship and technical capacity through the use of partnerships and local contractors. Kootenays
Kootenay Mule Deer Survival Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will assess factors limiting mule deer population growth in 4 study areas in the Kootenay Region by monitoring adult female survival, cause of death and fawn recruitment. Kootenays
Bull River Bighorn Sheep: Herd Health and Movement Dynamics Habitat Enhancement This proposal is to support the ongoing deployment of GPS collars as they continue to function and provide movement data and the potential for mortality investigations. There are 9/11 collars remaining on the Bull River herd, and 3/4 remaining on the Galton herd. The continued data fees and monitoring costs to maintain these 12 collars on bighorn sheep within these two herds is warranted given the 40% population decline in the Bull River herd, and the continued concern over contact with domestic sheep in both the Bull River and Galton herd ranges. Kootenays
Invasive plant management on bighorn sheep winter ranges Habitat Enhancement This proposed project involves a comprehensive and collaborative approach to managing invasive plants on 3 critical bighorn sheep winter ranges: Bull River, Wigwam Flats and Columbia Lake East. This proposed continuing project is attempting to increase the quality of grasslands by reducing invaders and increasing forage species. Kootenays
Diversifying MPB Clearcuts for Small Mustelids: Green-tree Retention, Debris Piles, and Enhanced Riparian habitats Habitat Enhancement Restoration of wildlife habitat with combined habitat components after clearcut harvesting of MPB-killed lodgepole pine stands. Three methods of habitat enhancement for small mustelids and their prey species to diversify clearcuts include (1) green-tree retention, (2) woody debris piles, and (3) enhanced riparian zones. Kootenays
Quantifying rates and mechanisms of grizzly bear mortality in the Elk Valley Habitat Enhancement Use radiotelemetry to identify the rates and causes of bear mortality (reported and unreported) in a population of bears facing one of the highest human-caused mortality rates in the province. Currently, the degree of under-reporting is unknown and suspected to be high, and these uncertainties compromise science-based management of grizzly bears locally and provincially. This project builds on a large body of research and previously collected data to provide recommendations for pressing management concerns and to engage the community in grizzly bear conservation. Kootenays
Maintenance of Furbearers and Prey Species on Large Clearcut Openings Using Linear Piles of Woody Debris Habitat Enhancement This proposal is designed to investigate the responses of small mustelids and their prey species to piles of woody debris arranged in a linear configuration across large (50+ ha) clearcut openings. Presence of these mammals in piles will indicate that these structures are effective as habitat in large clearcut openings. Kootenays
Elk movements and survival in the Elk Valley Habitat Enhancement Elk in the Elk Valley appear to have changed migration patterns in recent years. Productivity and survival of non-migratory and migratory elk in the Elk Valley may differ. This study examines elk movements and survival in the Elk Valley and will provide information to help make informed wildlife management decisions. Kootenays
Evaluating grizzly conservation management: quantifying recovery in the South Selkirks Habitat Enhancement This project is a unique opportunity to quantifiably evaluate 15 years of conservation activities recovering a threatened grizzly bear population in the South Selkirks using a DNA-based population survey. The results will allow BC’s first detailed, scientifically documented recovery process (from problem & solutions identification to solutions implementation, to realized conservation return) that will provide valuable input to the developing BC Grizzly Bear Management Plan. Our results will also inform conservation management of grizzly bear populations across BC by providing a blueprint for managing stressed grizzly bear populations. Kootenays
Premier Lake Park & adjacent Crown land Prescribed Burn Habitat Enhancement In partnership with the Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society (RMTS) and the Rocky Mountain Trench Ecosystem Restoration Program (RMTERP) and the BC Wildfire Service (BCWS), BC Parks will be conducting a 300 ha prescribed burn on 150 ha of park land as well as 150 ha of adjacent Crown land in the spring of 2019. This project aims to enhance habitat for wildlife in the Premier Lake Park area and on adjacent Crown land by restoring grassland and open forest habitats. Restoration of grasslands and open forests contributes to the region''s rich biodiversity by providing habitat for a wealth of wildlife species, many of which are at risk because habitat has been lost or degraded. Kootenays
Restoring Ungulate Habitat Through Clumpy Spacing Habitat Enhancement A clumpy-spacing trial was installed in 1990 to examine habitat enhancement for ungulates (deer winter range) through a unique spacing regime of overstocked stands of juvenile trees. This project will evaluate whether clumping spacing enhanced habitat use by ungulates and regionally-important wildlife. Cariboo
Ecology of small mammals in post-fire and salvage-logged landscapes Habitat Enhancement Fires and post-fire salvage-logging have unknown but likely significant impacts on small mammals, which are important prey species for forest carnivores. This project will quantify abundances and distribution of mice and voles, snowshoe hares, and red squirrels in response to these disturbances west of Williams Lake, where we are conducting concurrent work on marten. Cariboo
Assessing cougar density in The Cariboo Region through non-invasive survey techniques Habitat Enhancement A mark-recapture DNA science-based project utilizing closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to estimate cougar population densities in a study area of region 5. This project will incorporate a citizen science component for estimating cougar populations by including stakeholders. Cariboo
Assessing high-elevation forest harvesting strategies to maintain caribou and moose habitat Habitat Enhancement This is a two-year study designed to understand the use of high-elevation forestry blocks by moose, caribou, wolves and bears. We will assess differences in the distribution and abundance of moose and their predators across an adaptive management trial with conventional (>25ha) and small (<1.0ha) clearcuts as well as an unharvested control. This study will provide guidance to land managers attempting to limit apparent competition between moose and caribou, however, the results could be applied to efforts to enhance moose habitat across portions of the province where caribou and moose are not spatially adjacent. Cariboo
Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat Habitat Enhancement This is year 3 in the 2nd 5-yr cycle of a multi-partner project to restore endangered whitebark pine ecosystems with high value habitat value for bears in the southern Skeena Region. 2019-2020 plans include: (1) prepare a plan to optimally use the large whitebark pine seed collection made in 2018; (2) monitor 2014 and 2017 restoration plantings; (3) complete 5th research report on whitebark pine assisted migration trial (2012-2013 plantings); (4) continue outreach and extension activities including installation of an interpretive sign on Hudson Bay Mtn. Skeena
Determining Population Management Unit Boundaries for Mountain Goats in Skeena Region Habitat Enhancement We will monitor movements, home ranges, habitat selection and genetic relatedness of mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) on three adjacent mountain complexes northeast of Smithers, BC to determine biologically meaningful population management unit boundaries for these populations; results of this study can help to inform biologically based PMUs in the remainder of the Skeena Region. Skeena
Tahltan Burn Plan Habitat Enhancement We would like to develop a burn plan and schedule for identified critical habitat areas within the Tahltan Territory. Through community meetings and discussions with individuals within the local Tahltan communities we have identified areas that would benefit from habitat enhancement burning for moose, Stone’s sheep and mountian goat populations within the Tahltan Territory. Precipitation monitoring has shown an increase in rain during the growing seasons and a reduction in snow packs over the last decade. This has lead to a changing land scape across the Tahltan territory. There has been encroachment of evergreen and deciduous trees into the alpine and open areas reducing ungulate food sources. There has also been an increase in willow and alder growth in many areas. We are looking to incorporate a more pro-active approach to enhancing wildlife populations within our territory. The Tahltan Central Government has invested significant amounts of it’s own resources into our wildlife and lands programs but we do not have the capacity at the moment to deliver a burn program without assistance from outside sources. Through this project we would like to build the capacity to develop projects internally. Skeena
CHRF Whitesail Reach Habitat Enhancement This restoration project is designed to benefit the Tweedsmuir-Entiako caribou herd by clearing debris from the shore line of calving islands on Whitesail Lake. Skeena
CHRF Tweedsmuir – Entiako Caribou Lichen Restoration Habitat Enhancement This restoration project is designed to benefit the Tweedsmuir-Entiako herd by seeding lichen fragments over 50 ha in areas impacted by Chelaslie wildfire. Skeena
Enhancing caribou survival within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds Habitat Enhancement This will be Year 6 of the maternal penning project that is used as one of several complementary emergency measures implemented to avert extirpation, and eventually recover, the population of caribou known as the Klinse-Za/Scott herds located in the south Peace region of northern British Columbia. Omineca/Peace
Tuchodi Prescribed Burns for Wildlife Habitat Habitat Enhancement The Tuchodi Prescribed Burn Program seeks to support critical winter range for multiple ungulate species in northern British Columbia by improving the quantity and nutritional quality of forage in winter range habitats. By restoring early-seral habitats and rejuvenating mid-seral habitats, the program will ensure the long-term sustainability of ungulate populations, maintain hunting and recreational opportunities, and support traditional use of wildlife by First Nations. Omineca/Peace
Wolf predation risk to moose in north-central BC Habitat Enhancement This project investigates seasonal wolf predation risk to moose in two of the provincial moose research project study sites. We track kill sites of up to 10 wolf packs in each site by deploying satellite collars and checking location clusters for evidence and type of prey killed, while also determining space use parameters and resource selection. Omineca/Peace
Chase Caribou Herd Response to Extensive Habitat Alterations Habitat Enhancement This project will assess the potential impacts of recent large-scale habitat alterations caused by damaged forests (wildfire and mountain pine beetle) on the population stability of the Chase caribou herd. We will contrast current population parameters (i.e., seasonal range use, habitat use/selection, mortality causes, and calf recruitment) to population parameters of the herd prior to recent disturbance. Omineca/Peace
KlinseZa/Scott East Caribou Maternal Pen Health Evaluation Habitat Enhancement Emergency recovery measures have led to improved outcomes for the demographics of the threatened Klinse-Za herd in north-central BC, but the effects of this intensive and invasive management on individual and herd health have just begun to be investigated. In year 1 of this project, we formed collaborations with wildlife health experts, and are submitting health samples for laboratory analyses addressing various metrics of stress, nutrition, pathogens, and body condition; a summary database and report are planned for end of the fiscal year. In this 2nd year, we propose to submit 2019 penning samples for labwork, analyze the laboratory results, and interpret the findings; in the third year, to submit a peer-reviewed publication. Omineca/Peace
Sharp-tailed Grouse Population and Lek Habitat Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will re-initiate the monitoring of sharp-tailed grouse populations in the North Peace and produce a complete reproductive season habitat model. Results of this project will determine population status, increase knowledge of the sub-species, contribute to management of the species and provide guidance to industrial proponents. Omineca/Peace
Linking forest condition, heat stress, and moose health Habitat Enhancement Moose cope poorly with heat and must seek thermal shelter during periods of heat stress. However, recourse to thermal shelter logically requires that it be in sufficient supply. The purpose of this study is to investigate the thermal environment in a region where Mountain Pine Beetle salvage logging has radically shifted the landscape to an early-seral condition. Operative temperature will be measured in common forest types to determine the a) gravity of thermal stress in this landscape and b) extent to which it is under management control. Omineca/Peace
Implications of bear demography on recovery of the Klinse-Za caribou herd Habitat Enhancement This seed project will result in a collaboratively developed, multi-year funding proposal to address information gaps in black and grizzly bear demography, distribution, and diets; particularly in relation to the implementation of caribou recovery measures in the Klinse-Za caribou herd. Omineca/Peace
Evaluating elk population trend, habitat use, and potential for competition with moose in the southern central Omineca Habitat Enhancement Female elk will be collared in the southern Omineca around Prince George and monitored to determine survival rate, calf recruitment and population trends as baseline information. Resource selection will determine habitat use to inform elk management regionally where extensive mountain pine beetle salvage has occurred. Collared elk will allow regional staff to develop a refined sightability correction factor to facilitate accurate abundance estimates. Omineca/Peace
Canada Lynx habitat ecology on an intensively harvested landscape. Habitat Enhancement Using a combination of GPS collars and non-invasive survey techniques we will investigate the habitat ecology and population status of Canada lynx in an intensively harvested landscape in central BC. The aim of this study is to provide applied recommendations for habitat and species management as well as improve monitoring methods for Canada lynx in a rapidly changing landscape. Omineca/Peace
Northern Myotis Maternal Roost Study Habitat Enhancement Locate and describe biophysical attributes of maternal colonies of the federally endangered northern myotis (often multiple trees within a geographic area) through capture and radio telemetry to inform 1) understanding and identification of critical habitat as recommended in the species recovery strategy (Environment Canada 2015), 2) contribute to the develop of a habitat management tool for industry 3) provide information to contribute to WHA designation should the re-assessment of Identified Wildlife include northern myotis, 4) contribute to mitigation for habitat loss such as creation of wildlife habitat trees with collaborators. Omineca/Peace
Little Bobtail Wildfire Ecosystem Restoration Plan – Riparian Planting Habitat Enhancement The Society for Ecosystem Restoration in Northern BC (SERNbc) has identified an opportunity to improve riparian ecosystem functioning impacted by the Little Bobtail wildfire in 2015. As part of a broader Ecosystem Restoration Plan (ERP) already completed, this project seeks to plant 37,000 trees across 48 hectares of burned riparian areas critical to local fish and wildlife populations. Omineca/Peace
CHRF Kotcho Lake Restoration Area Habitat Enhancement This project is designed to benefit the SnakeSahtahneh caribou herd by limiting predator use of legacy seismic lines and using re-vegetation to increase habitat suitability for caribou. Omineca/Peace
Mule deer response to wildfire and habitat change in southern British Columbia Habitat Enhancement Identify the effect of wildfire on mule deer habitat selection and population growth in the Boundary Region, West Okanagan, and Bonaparte Plateau areas of British Columbia, and provide management tools and recommendations to increase mule deer abundance. Okanagan
Project Title Society Purpose Project Description Location
2020-2021 Co-Funded Projects - FESBC / HCTF
Got Bats? B.C. Community Outreach, Conservation and Citizen Science Project Habitat Enhancement "Got Bats?" is a network of community bat projects across BC that promotes bat conservation through the detection and protection of bat roosts, education to counter negative attitudes towards bats, enhancement of habitat including installation of bat‐houses, and a province‐wide Citizen Science bat count to engage the public and detect population declines due to White-nose Syndrome and other threats. Implemented by local, established stewardship organizations with direct landowner contacts in each region, the importance of this initiative has been widely recognized by the BC Government and BC Bat Action Team, and support for the program is a high priority action item in the BC Bat Action Plan (BC Bat Action Team, 2016). Multi-Region
Monitoring and Protecting BC''s bat diversity prior to White-Nose Syndrome Habitat Enhancement White-nose Syndrome continues to devastate eastern bat populations, and is found in Washington state in the west. We will continue to work with cavers and other citizen scientists to identify important bat habitats, and establish baseline species diversity and relative abundance -- reference points necessary for future monitoring, surveillance, mitigation, and recovery. Multi-Region
Rattlesnake populations: Response to land management regimes and historical changes. Habitat Enhancement This project revisits the ecology of populations of Western Rattlesnakes (a species-at-risk) originally studied over 30 years ago. The main questions being addressed are (i) how have snake populations changed over 30+ years, and (ii) how do different management regimes affect these changes? Given that data of this type are practically nonexistent, this project will provide important new data for assessing how landscape use and attributes affect these animals. Multi-Region
Developing a prophylactic probiotic approach for reducing white-nose syndrome severity in bats Habitat Enhancement Using bacteria sourced from local healthy bats, we have derived a probiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of white-nose syndrome (WNS), the fungal disease poised to devastate western North American bat populations. Now that we have successfully tested this probiotic on captive building-roosting bats, we have concluded that it is effective at changing bat wing microbiomes and slows the growth of the fungus (referred to as Pd) which causes this deadly bat disease, readying us for a final captive trial then field implementation in 2019. At maternity roosts in the Vancouver region we will compare bat ecology and health pre- and post-treatment prior to when bats leave to hibernation with an enhanced anti-WNS wing flora which we anticipate will delay or prevent Pd growth for a long enough portion of the winter to increase survivorship. Multi-Region
Fisher Habitat Conservation – Extension and Field Trials Habitat Enhancement This project strives to increase the ability of foresters and forest workers to improve habitat outcomes for fishers in their operations and inspire them to include habitat needs of fishers in their forest management decisions. Multi-Region
Determining factors affecting moose population change: assessing calving and survival rates Habitat Enhancement This project will enable new and continued information flow on moose population trends required for management decisions by assessing calf and cow survival rates and calving rates. These demographic parameters are primary drivers of population trend and key research gaps identified from the initial 5-year (2013-2018) Provincial Moose Research Project. Multi-Region
Using Local Knowledge and Hunter-based Sampling to Inform Mountain Caribou Conservation Habitat Enhancement We will fill knowledge gaps on health status and population trends of Northern Mountain caribou herds in BC through rigorous documentation of guide-outfitter knowledge and analyzing biological samples from harvested caribou. Concurrently, we will work with communities to develop capacity and a framework for community-based monitoring of wildlife health, status and trends. Multi-Region
Estimating Cougar (Puma concolor vancouverensis) Populations on Northern Vancouver Island using DNA mark-recapture techniques Habitat Enhancement This project utilizes DNA-based mark-recapture inventory techniques and closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to create science-based cougar population estimates for Northern Vancouver Island. This project is properly designed, includes partnerships/stakeholders, and is science based, cost-effective and repeatable. Vancouver Island
West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project Habitat Enhancement The primary objective of this project is to re-establish viable Roosevelt Elk populations in wilderness areas of the West Coast Region while mitigating conflicts through translocation of elk from agricultural areas and along the highways of Vancouver Island, BC. Partnerships with community organizations, stakeholders, industry and First Nations governments, for translocations are key to facilitate recovery of this blue-listed species on Vancouver Island and are proven as instrumental on the mainland coast. Relocated herds will help improve ecosystem function and provide future opportunities for sustenance and recreational uses in new population units. Vancouver Island
Seasonal habitat supply for the management and restoration of Roosevelt Elk Habitat Enhancement We will deploy over 60 GPS collars on Roosevelt Elk on Vancouver Island to validate an existing winter habitat model and develop habitat models for all seasons to quantify the relationship between habitat use and elk populations. Project outcomes will improve elk habitat and population management decisions. Vancouver Island
Reestablishing Vancouver Island Marmots in Strathcona Provincial Park Habitat Enhancement The Marmot Recovery Foundation will build and extend on efforts to reintroduce Vancouver Island Marmots to Strathcona Provincial Park, and create a self-sustaining population of the endemic mammals. Efforts will focus on translocations, food enhancement, monitoring and potentially habitat restoration as guided by BC Parks. Vancouver Island
South Coast Grizzly Bear Ecology and Cumulative Effects Research Habitat Enhancement This project is investigating several aspects of grizzly bear ecology, with a focus on space-use and movements relative to influential factors of habitat and human activity. Inferences will be directly relevant to understanding short- and long-term implications of cumulative human impacts on grizzly bear recovery and conservation. Data will also contribute to long-term tracking of population responses. Predictive outputs that are empirically tested will serve to direct appropriate mitigation and conservation strategies. Lower Mainland
Conservation of Threatened Raptors on the Sunshine Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct surveys to identify and assess occupied breeding territories for Northern Goshawks on the Sunshine Coast, and will work with government, First Nations, industry, and landowners to protect habitat for Goshawks and other raptors. Community engagement activities will improve awareness and participation in raptor stewardship. Lower Mainland
Improving Wildlife Habitat in Logged and Fire-Damaged Coastal Forests Habitat Enhancement We will increase the quantity and quality of habitat for wetland-dependent wildlife on the Sunshine Coast by working with logging contractors and tenure holders to conserve, restore, enhance, and create wetlands in recently logged and fire-damaged forests. Lower Mainland
Wolverine (Gulo gulo) movements, home range and habitat use in a human dominated landscape, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to examine home ranges, seasonal movements, and habitat use of wolverines in the South Coast. While inventories have been completed, further information is needed on movements, home range size, and habitat use in relation to human activities in order to better manage wolverines in a multiple use landscape. This proposal builds on the inventory and distribution data collected in HCTF Projects 2-519 and 2-600. Lower Mainland
Mountain Goat Seasonal Movements and Habitat Use in the Mount Meager Complex, South Coast Habitat Enhancement We propose to radio collar (GPS) 35-45 mountain goats in the Mount Meager Complex. The objectives are to determine if these goats make large seasonal movements to and from winter ranges, as well as quantify habitat use in winter and summer in relation to the burned habitats. As this is a hunted population and perhaps one of the largest and most important goat populations in the South Coast, this information on seasonal movements and habitat use is crucial in our understanding of how to better manage this population. Lower Mainland
Roosevelt Elk Inventory - South Coast Habitat Enhancement We will conduct inventory of Roosevelt Elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) in the South Coast Region, through annual aerial flights. This project will generate population estimates for each unit surveyed and results will lead to improved conservation, management and planning. Lower Mainland
Thompson Region Bighorn Sheep Collaring Project Habitat Enhancement This project aims to collar 30-33 bighorn sheep rams from different herds in the Thompson region to better quantify connectivity of Thompson bighorn sheep herds, as well as clarify core home range use, summer and winter range migration timing and movement rates and ram foray patterns. The project will also develop a herd health baseline dataset from biological samples from individuals in each herd. Thompson - Nicola
Monitoring the Stein/Nahatlatch Grizzly Bear Population during Recovery. Habitat Enhancement This isolated and Critically Endangered grizzly bear population has been monitored using DNA sampling since 2005. To avoid an extended break in this continuity, we plan to continue the monitoring as the Province implements recovery actions every two years. The project is structured consistent with the spirit of Reconciliation and with the principals of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) “to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions”. Thompson - Nicola
South Rockies Grizzly Bear Inventory Habitat Enhancement We have been monitoring grizzly bear population trend in wildlife management units 4-01, 4-02, and 4-23 since 2006. Analysis has informed management decisions such as adjusting hunting quotas based on recent field-based population estimates, closing the hunting season in the South Rockies GBPU after a period of population decline, and planning access closures near huckleberry patches in 4-23. We now intend to focus on understanding and mitigating the causes of non-hunting mortality, especially when it is not reported nor recorded in the provincial mortality data and, monitor the recovery from the recent population decline. Kootenays
Boundary Restoration and Enhancement Program Habitat Enhancement This project will improve habitat quality, resiliency and forage availability for ungulates and other native species by restoring or enhancing degraded habitats in a range of ecosystems across the Boundary. This project will build community stewardship and technical capacity through the use of partnerships and local contractors. Kootenays
Kootenay Mule Deer Survival Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will assess factors limiting mule deer population growth in 4 study areas in the Kootenay Region by monitoring adult female survival, cause of death and fawn recruitment. Kootenays
Bull River Bighorn Sheep: Herd Health and Movement Dynamics Habitat Enhancement This proposal is to support the ongoing deployment of GPS collars as they continue to function and provide movement data and the potential for mortality investigations. There are 9/11 collars remaining on the Bull River herd, and 3/4 remaining on the Galton herd. The continued data fees and monitoring costs to maintain these 12 collars on bighorn sheep within these two herds is warranted given the 40% population decline in the Bull River herd, and the continued concern over contact with domestic sheep in both the Bull River and Galton herd ranges. Kootenays
Invasive plant management on bighorn sheep winter ranges Habitat Enhancement This proposed project involves a comprehensive and collaborative approach to managing invasive plants on 3 critical bighorn sheep winter ranges: Bull River, Wigwam Flats and Columbia Lake East. This proposed continuing project is attempting to increase the quality of grasslands by reducing invaders and increasing forage species. Kootenays
Diversifying MPB Clearcuts for Small Mustelids: Green-tree Retention, Debris Piles, and Enhanced Riparian habitats Habitat Enhancement Restoration of wildlife habitat with combined habitat components after clearcut harvesting of MPB-killed lodgepole pine stands. Three methods of habitat enhancement for small mustelids and their prey species to diversify clearcuts include (1) green-tree retention, (2) woody debris piles, and (3) enhanced riparian zones. Kootenays
Quantifying rates and mechanisms of grizzly bear mortality in the Elk Valley Habitat Enhancement Use radiotelemetry to identify the rates and causes of bear mortality (reported and unreported) in a population of bears facing one of the highest human-caused mortality rates in the province. Currently, the degree of under-reporting is unknown and suspected to be high, and these uncertainties compromise science-based management of grizzly bears locally and provincially. This project builds on a large body of research and previously collected data to provide recommendations for pressing management concerns and to engage the community in grizzly bear conservation. Kootenays
Maintenance of Furbearers and Prey Species on Large Clearcut Openings Using Linear Piles of Woody Debris Habitat Enhancement This proposal is designed to investigate the responses of small mustelids and their prey species to piles of woody debris arranged in a linear configuration across large (50+ ha) clearcut openings. Presence of these mammals in piles will indicate that these structures are effective as habitat in large clearcut openings. Kootenays
Elk movements and survival in the Elk Valley Habitat Enhancement Elk in the Elk Valley appear to have changed migration patterns in recent years. Productivity and survival of non-migratory and migratory elk in the Elk Valley may differ. This study examines elk movements and survival in the Elk Valley and will provide information to help make informed wildlife management decisions. Kootenays
Evaluating grizzly conservation management: quantifying recovery in the South Selkirks Habitat Enhancement This project is a unique opportunity to quantifiably evaluate 15 years of conservation activities recovering a threatened grizzly bear population in the South Selkirks using a DNA-based population survey. The results will allow BC’s first detailed, scientifically documented recovery process (from problem & solutions identification to solutions implementation, to realized conservation return) that will provide valuable input to the developing BC Grizzly Bear Management Plan. Our results will also inform conservation management of grizzly bear populations across BC by providing a blueprint for managing stressed grizzly bear populations. Kootenays
Premier Lake Park & adjacent Crown land Prescribed Burn Habitat Enhancement In partnership with the Rocky Mountain Trench Natural Resources Society (RMTS) and the Rocky Mountain Trench Ecosystem Restoration Program (RMTERP) and the BC Wildfire Service (BCWS), BC Parks will be conducting a 300 ha prescribed burn on 150 ha of park land as well as 150 ha of adjacent Crown land in the spring of 2019. This project aims to enhance habitat for wildlife in the Premier Lake Park area and on adjacent Crown land by restoring grassland and open forest habitats. Restoration of grasslands and open forests contributes to the region''s rich biodiversity by providing habitat for a wealth of wildlife species, many of which are at risk because habitat has been lost or degraded. Kootenays
Restoring Ungulate Habitat Through Clumpy Spacing Habitat Enhancement A clumpy-spacing trial was installed in 1990 to examine habitat enhancement for ungulates (deer winter range) through a unique spacing regime of overstocked stands of juvenile trees. This project will evaluate whether clumping spacing enhanced habitat use by ungulates and regionally-important wildlife. Cariboo
Ecology of small mammals in post-fire and salvage-logged landscapes Habitat Enhancement Fires and post-fire salvage-logging have unknown but likely significant impacts on small mammals, which are important prey species for forest carnivores. This project will quantify abundances and distribution of mice and voles, snowshoe hares, and red squirrels in response to these disturbances west of Williams Lake, where we are conducting concurrent work on marten. Cariboo
Assessing cougar density in The Cariboo Region through non-invasive survey techniques Habitat Enhancement A mark-recapture DNA science-based project utilizing closed spatial mark-recapture modelling to estimate cougar population densities in a study area of region 5. This project will incorporate a citizen science component for estimating cougar populations by including stakeholders. Cariboo
Assessing high-elevation forest harvesting strategies to maintain caribou and moose habitat Habitat Enhancement This is a two-year study designed to understand the use of high-elevation forestry blocks by moose, caribou, wolves and bears. We will assess differences in the distribution and abundance of moose and their predators across an adaptive management trial with conventional (>25ha) and small (<1.0ha) clearcuts as well as an unharvested control. This study will provide guidance to land managers attempting to limit apparent competition between moose and caribou, however, the results could be applied to efforts to enhance moose habitat across portions of the province where caribou and moose are not spatially adjacent. Cariboo
Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat Habitat Enhancement This is year 3 in the 2nd 5-yr cycle of a multi-partner project to restore endangered whitebark pine ecosystems with high value habitat value for bears in the southern Skeena Region. 2019-2020 plans include: (1) prepare a plan to optimally use the large whitebark pine seed collection made in 2018; (2) monitor 2014 and 2017 restoration plantings; (3) complete 5th research report on whitebark pine assisted migration trial (2012-2013 plantings); (4) continue outreach and extension activities including installation of an interpretive sign on Hudson Bay Mtn. Skeena
Determining Population Management Unit Boundaries for Mountain Goats in Skeena Region Habitat Enhancement We will monitor movements, home ranges, habitat selection and genetic relatedness of mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) on three adjacent mountain complexes northeast of Smithers, BC to determine biologically meaningful population management unit boundaries for these populations; results of this study can help to inform biologically based PMUs in the remainder of the Skeena Region. Skeena
Tahltan Burn Plan Habitat Enhancement We would like to develop a burn plan and schedule for identified critical habitat areas within the Tahltan Territory. Through community meetings and discussions with individuals within the local Tahltan communities we have identified areas that would benefit from habitat enhancement burning for moose, Stone’s sheep> and mountian goat populations within the Tahltan Territory. Precipitation monitoring has shown an increase in rain during the growing seasons and a reduction in snow packs over the last decade. This has lead to a changing land scape across the Tahltan territory. There has been encroachment of evergreen and deciduous trees into the alpine and open areas reducing ungulate food sources. There has also been an increase in willow and alder growth in many areas. We are looking to incorporate a more pro-active approach to enhancing wildlife populations within our territory. The Tahltan Central Government has invested significant amounts of it’s own resources into our wildlife and lands programs but we do not have the capacity at the moment to deliver a burn program without assistance from outside sources. Through this project we would like to build the capacity to develop projects internally. Skeena
CHRF Whitesail Reach Habitat Enhancement This restoration project is designed to benefit the Tweedsmuir-Entiako caribou herd by clearing debris from the shore line of calving islands on Whitesail Lake. Skeena
CHRF Tweedsmuir – Entiako Caribou Lichen Restoration Habitat Enhancement This restoration project is designed to benefit the Tweedsmuir-Entiako herd by seeding lichen fragments over 50 ha in areas impacted by Chelaslie wildfire. Skeena
Enhancing caribou survival within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds Habitat Enhancement This will be Year 6 of the maternal penning project that is used as one of several complementary emergency measures implemented to avert extirpation, and eventually recover, the population of caribou known as the Klinse-Za/Scott herds located in the south Peace region of northern British Columbia. Omineca/Peace
Tuchodi Prescribed Burns for Wildlife Habitat Habitat Enhancement The Tuchodi Prescribed Burn Program seeks to support critical winter range for multiple ungulate species in northern British Columbia by improving the quantity and nutritional quality of forage in winter range habitats. By restoring early-seral habitats and rejuvenating mid-seral habitats, the program will ensure the long-term sustainability of ungulate populations, maintain hunting and recreational opportunities, and support traditional use of wildlife by First Nations. Omineca/Peace
Wolf predation risk to moose in north-central BC Habitat Enhancement This project investigates seasonal wolf predation risk to moose in two of the provincial moose research project study sites. We track kill sites of up to 10 wolf packs in each site by deploying satellite collars and checking location clusters for evidence and type of prey killed, while also determining space use parameters and resource selection. Omineca/Peace
Chase Caribou Herd Response to Extensive Habitat Alterations Habitat Enhancement This project will assess the potential impacts of recent large-scale habitat alterations caused by damaged forests (wildfire and mountain pine beetle) on the population stability of the Chase caribou herd. We will contrast current population parameters (i.e., seasonal range use, habitat use/selection, mortality causes, and calf recruitment) to population parameters of the herd prior to recent disturbance. Omineca/Peace
KlinseZa/Scott East Caribou Maternal Pen Health Evaluation Habitat Enhancement Emergency recovery measures have led to improved outcomes for the demographics of the threatened Klinse-Za herd in north-central BC, but the effects of this intensive and invasive management on individual and herd health have just begun to be investigated. In year 1 of this project, we formed collaborations with wildlife health experts, and are submitting health samples for laboratory analyses addressing various metrics of stress, nutrition, pathogens, and body condition; a summary database and report are planned for end of the fiscal year. In this 2nd year, we propose to submit 2019 penning samples for labwork, analyze the laboratory results, and interpret the findings; in the third year, to submit a peer-reviewed publication. Omineca/Peace
Sharp-tailed Grouse Population and Lek Habitat Monitoring Habitat Enhancement This project will re-initiate the monitoring of sharp-tailed grouse populations in the North Peace and produce a complete reproductive season habitat model. Results of this project will determine population status, increase knowledge of the sub-species, contribute to management of the species and provide guidance to industrial proponents. Omineca/Peace
Linking forest condition, heat stress, and moose health Habitat Enhancement Moose cope poorly with heat and must seek thermal shelter during periods of heat stress. However, recourse to thermal shelter logically requires that it be in sufficient supply. The purpose of this study is to investigate the thermal environment in a region where Mountain Pine Beetle salvage logging has radically shifted the landscape to an early-seral condition. Operative temperature will be measured in common forest types to determine the a) gravity of thermal stress in this landscape and b) extent to which it is under management control. Omineca/Peace
Implications of bear demography on recovery of the Klinse-Za caribou herd Habitat Enhancement This seed project will result in a collaboratively developed, multi-year funding proposal to address information gaps in black and grizzly bear demography, distribution, and diets; particularly in relation to the implementation of caribou recovery measures in the Klinse-Za caribou herd. Omineca/Peace
Evaluating elk population trend, habitat use, and potential for competition with moose in the southern central Omineca Habitat Enhancement Female elk will be collared in the southern Omineca around Prince George and monitored to determine survival rate, calf recruitment and population trends as baseline information. Resource selection will determine habitat use to inform elk management regionally where extensive mountain pine beetle salvage has occurred. Collared elk will allow regional staff to develop a refined sightability correction factor to facilitate accurate abundance estimates. Omineca/Peace
Canada Lynx habitat ecology on an intensively harvested landscape. Habitat Enhancement Using a combination of GPS collars and non-invasive survey techniques we will investigate the habitat ecology and population status of Canada lynx in an intensively harvested landscape in central BC. The aim of this study is to provide applied recommendations for habitat and species management as well as improve monitoring methods for Canada lynx in a rapidly changing landscape. Omineca/Peace
Northern Myotis Maternal Roost Study Habitat Enhancement Locate and describe biophysical attributes of maternal colonies of the federally endangered northern myotis (often multiple trees within a geographic area) through capture and radio telemetry to inform 1) understanding and identification of critical habitat as recommended in the species recovery strategy (Environment Canada 2015), 2) contribute to the develop of a habitat management tool for industry 3) provide information to contribute to WHA designation should the re-assessment of Identified Wildlife include northern myotis, 4) contribute to mitigation for habitat loss such as creation of wildlife habitat trees with collaborators. Omineca/Peace
Little Bobtail Wildfire Ecosystem Restoration Plan – Riparian Planting Habitat Enhancement The Society for Ecosystem Restoration in Northern BC (SERNbc) has identified an opportunity to improve riparian ecosystem functioning impacted by the Little Bobtail wildfire in 2015. As part of a broader Ecosystem Restoration Plan (ERP) already completed, this project seeks to plant 37,000 trees across 48 hectares of burned riparian areas critical to local fish and wildlife populations. Omineca/Peace
CHRF Kotcho Lake Restoration Area Habitat Enhancement This project is designed to benefit the SnakeSahtahneh caribou herd by limiting predator use of legacy seismic lines and using re-vegetation to increase habitat suitability for caribou. Omineca/Peace
Mule deer response to wildfire and habitat change in southern British Columbia Habitat Enhancement Identify the effect of wildfire on mule deer habitat selection and population growth in the Boundary Region, West Okanagan, and Bonaparte Plateau areas of British Columbia, and provide management tools and recommendations to increase mule deer abundance. Okanagan

Project Updates


West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project

Translocated elk leave the truck in the Phelps Elk Population Unit on Vancouver Island as part of a project re-establishing elk on northern Vancouver Island.

West Coast Roosevelt Elk Augmentation and Recovery Project

Fisher Artificial Reproductive Den Box Study

Biologist Larry Davis inspects one of the den boxes installed as part of the Fisher Artificial Reproductive Den Box Study.

Fisher Artificial Reproductive Den Box Study

High Lake Grassland and Open Forest Restoration Pilot

The High Lake Grassland and Open Forest Restoration Pilot aims to restore approximately 80 ha of mixed open grassland and open forest habitats degraded by tree encroachment and ingrowth in the Churn Creek Protected Area.

High Lake Grassland and Open Forest Restoration Pilot

Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat

In the South Skeena region, FESBC is co-funding a project to restore endangered whitebark pine ecosystems, which are of high value to grizzly bear and birds such as Clark’s Nutcracker.

Restoring Whitebark Pine Ecosystems to Enhance Subalpine Bear Habitat

Enhancing Caribou Survival Within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds

Caribou calves from the Klinse-Za/Scott herds are protected in maternal pens for the short period when they are highly vulnerable to predation.

Enhancing Caribou Survival Within the Klinse-Za/Scott herds

South Okanagan Similkameen Conservation Program (SOSCP) Habitat Conservation Delivery

The South Okanagan Similkameen Conservation Program is a partnership of 50 non-profit organizations, First Nations organizations, and government working together to conserve nature for South Okanagan and Similkameen communities.

South Okanagan Similkameen Conservation Program (SOSCP) Habitat Conservation Delivery

Slocan Integral Forestry Cooperative

Slocan Integral Forestry Cooperative Board members and employees installing signage at a recently completed FESBC-funded fuel management project to reduce wildfire risk to the local community.

Slocan Project Staff

Nazko Wildfire Risk Reduction Project

FESBC Board member Jim Snetsinger, FESBC and FLNRO staff and the Nazko Economic Development Corporation CEO, Kevin Ainsworth. The group was enjoying a warm-up coffee during a field trip on February 6, 2017 to review the FESBC fuel management treatment near the community of Nazko in the Quesnel Natural Resource District. A bright, but chilly, day in the Cariboo Chilcotin – a perfect day for viewing the Nazko Logging Ltd. crew in action.

Nazko Wildfire Risk Reduction Project

FESBC Board member, Jim Snetsinger discussing the operations with Nazko Economic Development Corporation CEO, Kevin Ainsworth. Nazko Logging Ltd. was actively removing and merchandising dead pine as part of the fuel management treatments being designed to protect local communities from the risks of wildfire.

Nazko Wildfire Risk Reduction Project